Tag: bread

5 Ways to Use Day-Old Bread

by in How-to, April 1st, 2014

5 Ways to Use Day-Old BreadWhen I was growing up, my mom always kept a stash of stale bread destined to become breadcrumbs. It’s a thrifty way to make use of leftovers, and also not waste any of your grocery budgets. I always mean to do this, but the truth is I get impatient. To make breadcrumbs, the bread must be rid of all moisture. Depending on the temperature in your house, this could take weeks of waiting. You could speed the process up by baking the bread at a low temperature, essentially dehydrating it. Once I get to the point of turning on the oven, though, I want a bigger payoff.

What starts as a journey for homemade breadcrumbs eventually turns into croutons or crisps, like the recipe for these savory, cracker-like ones below. They’re perfect for topping with some creamy ricotta cheese and a drizzle of honey, and they also lend some oomph to a charcuterie platter. If I manage to have any left, I give them a whirl in the food processor for seasoned homemade breadcrumbs, which brings my cooking endeavor full circle.

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Herbed Garlic Bread — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, February 23rd, 2014

Herbed Garlic BreadYou’ll have to look to the side to find this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week: Herbed Garlic Bread. Whether you serve it along side spaghetti and meatballs, roast chicken or chili, Tyler’s version packs an herb-y punch with fresh basil and parsley. Combine those with butter and garlic and your family will be quite content.

For more comfort food recipe inspiration, visit Food Network’s Let’s Cook Comfort Food board on Pinterest.

Get the Recipe: Herbed Garlic Bread

Sweet and Savory Trend: Monkey Bread

by in Recipes, November 19th, 2013

Overnight Monkey BreadLast week we noticed how much Food Network fans loved our monkey bread post on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. So to keep this delicious shareable treat trending, we rounded up three more monkey bread recipes for you to snack on, starting with Alton’s Overnight Monkey Bread. Alton makes his buttermilk yeast dough from scratch and slathers it with a buttery brown sugar mixture that’s flecked with rosemary and raisins. Prep this sweet and savory stunner the night before a big holiday brunch and you’ll have a stress-free and satisfying pastry ready in no time the next morning.

Sticky Monkey Bread: Food Network Magazine’s recipe boasts a thick homemade caramel sauce that oozes between each ball of dough. Spiked with dark rum, the caramel sauce forms a crackly outer crust and mingles perfectly with a layer of toasted nuts.

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How to Make Herbed Breadsticks

by in Food Network Magazine, April 8th, 2013

Herbed BreadsticksGive your breadsticks a fresh look for spring. Arrange refrigerated breadstick dough on a baking sheet and brush with a beaten egg. Place small, delicate herb leaves like dill, chervil, oregano or parsley on top, then brush with more of the egg and bake as directed.

(Photograph by Sam Kaplan)

15 Takes on Biscuits — Comfort Food Feast

by in Recipes, February 27th, 2013

Almost-Famous Cheddar Biscuits from Food Network MagazineHow many times have you clicked on the television to see a family grinning over store-bought biscuits coming fresh out of the oven? You can’t blame them; the biscuits are so hot you can pull them apart. The easy method is all well and good, but whipping up a batch from scratch is the most comforting route of all. For once, stray from your classic Southern Biscuits and tear into one of these many variations.

Consider Paula Deen the biscuit master. Her recipes for Cheese Biscuits, Sour Cream Butter Biscuits and Fried Biscuits go along with any hearty meal, and her Pineapple Upside-Down Biscuits and Sweet Potato Biscuits are made complete with a sweet edge.

Branch out with Food Network Magazine’s own biscuit concoctions. Almost-Famous Cheddar Biscuits (pictured above) and Bacon-Cheese Biscuits work wonders along a heaping bowl of chili, while Lemon-Thyme Biscuits and Dill Biscuits With Honey Butter embody the rejuvenating spirit of afternoon tea. The sweetness in Molasses Biscuits jives well with whole-wheat flour, wheat germ and fresh thyme. We bet you’ve never had Pumpkin-Parmesan Biscuits; they’re sweetened with sugar, spiced with nutmeg and spiked with finely grated cheese.

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Cast-Iron Skillet Focaccia — The Weekender

by in Recipes, October 5th, 2012

cast iron skillet focaccia
I bought my first cast-iron skillet in my early twenties. I didn’t have much of a budget for cookware in those days and all the advice I read said that cast iron was the best bang for my buck. All I really knew is that I didn’t want to deal with flimsy, peeling, nonstick pans anymore.

I was initially a little nervous about introducing cast iron into my kitchen, because I’d grown up with a mother who hated cast iron with a passion. She thought it was too heavy, fussy to care for and entirely unsanitary (because you’re not supposed to scrub it with soap. My mother is a firm believer in the power of a good, sudsy scour).

When my parents got married, she actually got rid of my dad’s beloved collection of cast-iron skillets. Forty-two years later, those long-gone skillets continue to be one of the few bones of contention in their marriage.

With this history, it’s understandable that I was uneasy about my own cast-iron purchase. Turns out my anxiety was entirely unwarranted. I fell hard for that first skillet, so much so that I added several others to my kitchen in short order. If my husband tossed out my skillets, I do believe it would be grounds for divorce.

Before you heat your skillet, read these tips

Dandelion Greens — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, March 26th, 2012

dandelion green cornbread
Let’s get the hard part out of the way. This week, I’m suggesting you eat something most people spend the better part of their adult lives trying to eradicate from their lawns: dandelion greens. Not the flowers or stems or the puffy white seeds kids love to blow (thereby complicating your eradication efforts).

Just the long, green leaves that grow toward the base of the plant.

While we know it better as a weed, since prehistory the leaves of this plant have been gathered and consumed around the world.

Americans have been cooking with them for many years. In fact, Fannie Farmer included them in the first edition (1896) of her classic cookbook.

The taste is a bit of a cross between arugula and kale — slightly bitter and robustly peppery. They are about a foot long with a saw-tooth edge.

Get the recipe for Cumin-Dandelion Green Cornbread

Focaccia — The Weekender

by in Recipes, February 17th, 2012

focaccia bread
I spent the first 25 years of my life entirely afraid of yeast. I wasn’t fearful of bread, mind you. It was scared of yeast as an ingredient. I heard it was very easy to kill and I lived in terror that if I took even the smallest misstep with a recipe, I’d ruin the whole thing and wind up with a bowl of flaccid pancake batter in place of a batch of bread dough.

And so I stayed away. I learned to make quick breads, scones and biscuits, and kept my distance from yeast. That is, until the no-knead bread craze swept the scene about six years ago. It was such a novel and approachable concept that I tried it. I ended up with a beautiful loaf of bread and was entirely infatuated with the process. It opened me up to yeast and we’ve been friends ever since.

These days, I bake some form of bread at least once every other week and have become so smitten that I even have a sourdough starter that I carefully tend to. Still, yeast is my first bread baking love and there’s nothing like it for a reliably light loaf for sandwiches and toast.

The most recent yeasty recipe I took for a spin was the Focaccia recipe from Anne Burrell. It’s a blessedly simple version, with just six ingredients (and that includes the water). For those of you who still harbor a bit of yeast anxiety, it’s just the thing to help you over that hump. And on a Sunday afternoon, there’s nothing nicer than having a bit of warm, tender bread to dip into a bowl of soup. Just the thing for The Weekender.

Before you start kneading, here are a few things you should know.

How to Make Challah

by in Holidays, Recipes, December 16th, 2011


Whether you’re prepping for Hanukkah or just looking to spruce up the bread basket at your holiday dinner, challah is a versatile, easy-to-make bread that is sure to impress your guests. Often made with silky honey or dried fruit, this light but dense loaf gets its consistency from several rich egg yolks. Take a look below at how Food Network Kitchens fashions Challah Crowns (pictured above), a unique twist on traditional bread braids.

More step-by-step photos and recipes »

Load Your Freezer With Baked Goods — Thanksgiving Tip of the Day

by in Holidays, November 9th, 2011

cranberry orange quickbread
Quick breads freeze well; just wrap tightly in foil or freezer-wrap and freeze for up to three months. To thaw, let stand, wrapped, at room temperature for about 1½ hours. Serve on Thanksgiving, or the next morning for breakfast.

Try making: Anne’s Cranberry Orange Quickbread (pictured above)

Browse more of Food Network’s Thanksgiving recipes and tips.