Tag: All Posts

Friends, Food and Turkey Day Tips Are on the Menu at Thanksgiving at Bobby’s

by in Shows, November 2nd, 2014

Thanksgiving at Bobby'sIf you’ve ever wondered what Thanksgiving looks like when an Iron Chef is in charge, you’re in luck because for the first time, fans will be able to watch Bobby Flay as he hosts his Food Network friends for a celebratory feast. On the all-new upcoming special Thanksgiving at Bobby’s, airing Saturday, Nov. 22 at 12|11c, Bobby will be joined by some of your other favorite chefs, Alex Guarnaschelli, Katie Lee, Sunny Anderson and Michael Symon, and together they will cook up a turkey day spread complete with all of the trimmings. They’ll even break down each course with chef-tested tips so you can tackle the holiday with ease.

In true Iron Chef style, Bobby’s menu will feature traditional picks like a simply roasted turkey and a hearty cornbread stuffing, but his recipes and those from the group will include new ways to dress up old-fashioned classics, like a maple glaze for his bird and a boldly spiced cauliflower side dish from Alex. Perhaps best of all, with five cooks in the kitchen, you can guarantee that the cast will offer strategies for stress-free hosting at home and share quick tricks for turning out next-level flavor at your house.

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Support Your Favorite Soup

by in News, November 1st, 2014

Tomato SoupSuddenly, it’s soup season. As the weather turns chilly and we begin to scrounge around in the backs of our closets for a pair of gloves that match (or, forget matching – one for each hand) and a warm hat, we may also begin to feel a deep urge to dip into one of our favorite soups. When it comes to soup, we all have our favorites, as well, perhaps, as our personal lists of the ones that, for whatever reason, we’re just not that into.

Recently, a writer on Jezebel posted a highly idiosyncratic personal ranking of soups, appropriately filed under “totally arbitrary rankings.” Whether or not you agree with the writer’s opinions (his top four: Lobster Bisque, French Onion, Cream of Crab, Tom Kha Gai) or admire his alternately amusing and perhaps a bit too salty turns of phrase, you have to concede that a ranking of soup is a delicious idea. (Note that others have done it before, with markedly different results.)

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FN Dish Found the Best Fall-Inspired Pinterest Boards

by in Community, November 1st, 2014

Fall-Inspired Pinterest BoardsJust a few weeks ago, FN Dish kicked off the fall season by asking fans to create their ultimate autumn-inspired Pinterest boards, and sure enough, readers delivered. You clicked through FoodNetwork.com and curated hundreds of pins celebrating all things apples, pumpkins, pies and crowd-pleasing comfort food, including Apple Crumble with Vanilla Ice Cream, Baked Pumpkin Rice Pudding, and Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese.

After scrolling through the boards and scouring the pins, FN Dish rounded up its top three picks for the best fall boards. Meet the winners, follow their boards, and get the featured recipes and tips below.

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Mastering the Basics of Braising + 6 Recipes to Try

by in Food Network Chef, November 1st, 2014

Braised Country-Style Pork RibsTurning the clocks back an hour feels like an unofficial start of winter, ever since the pumpkin spice latte decided to start making appearance since approximately August. (Technically I realize this is not true, but it sure feels that way.) Suddenly, the days will whiz by, as we speed our way to 2015, cooking and eating every step of the way, and sitting down to a dinner table with the windows newly darkened by night.

Which means: Turn on the ovens and braise some meat! So, in that spirit, let me give you a quick primer on this fantastic wintertime technique.

What is braising?
Braising is a method of cooking meat slowly in moist heat, usually with part of the meat submerged in an aromatic liquid. Often a large cast-iron pot or Dutch oven is used – the meat, vegetables and liquid are put into the Dutch oven, covered and then cooked over gentle, even, low heat for several hours.

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The Basics of Homemade Pumpkin Pie

by in Recipes, November 1st, 2014

Pumpkin PieWhile the turkey often takes center stage on Thanksgiving, for the sweet tooths at the table, it’s likely all about the most-anticipated final course: dessert —  in particular, the rich, creamy pumpkin pie. With a buttery crust and spiced pumpkin filling, this tried-and-true indulgence in a holiday staple, and with the help of a go-to recipe, it’s one you can surely make easily at home. Learn the basics of Food Network Kitchen’s Pumpkin Pie recipe below, then check out the complete gallery for the rest of the how-to.

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New App Aims to Predict Your Next Favorite Beer

by in News, October 31st, 2014

BeerSoon, when you’re ordering a beer at a bar or restaurant, you won’t need to ask your bartender or server for a recommendation. Neither, when you’re scanning the store shelves in search of a six-pack perfectly suited to your taste, will you have to make a split-second decision based on label alone.

We’ve all had memorable instances when we’ve plunked down our hard-earned money for a beer that sounded cool but left us cold. But there’s a new free app in the works that will take the guesswork out of beer buying.

A Wilmington, N.C.-based company called Next Glass is currently putting in the legwork to scientifically map the DNA of every single kind of beer sold in the United States in order to scientifically determine — based on beer you’ve liked in the past — what beer you’re likely to enjoy next. The app’s tagline: “It used to be subjective. Now, it’s personal.”

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Tailgate Chili — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, October 31st, 2014

The Southeastern Conference is home to some of the best college football in the country, and with it, some of the most-fervent fans and most-passionate tailgating. Football in the South is a bit like religion. People get really worked up; I mean really worked up. And, to that end, tailgating in the South is extreme as well. At the University of Alabama, fans are allowed to start tailgate setup at 6 p.m. the Thursday before the Saturday game — and dismantled as late as noon the day after! At my alma mater, the University of Georgia, there is Bulldog Park; a luxury RV tailgating facility offers the owners access to a wide range of amenities plus game-day shuttles to the stadium! Foodwise, there’s everything from LSU, where folks have big pots of meaty gumbo bubbling on a propane cooker, to The Grove at Ole Miss, where folks are super-fancy and serve dishes of hors d’oeuvres that you might be more accustomed to seeing at a ladies’ luncheon. (The real reason the food is so ladylike is that there’s a limited amount of electricity, and open flames and propane are prohibited — something that might not be a bad idea, considering the amount of alcohol consumed while tailgating!)

Personally, I prefer less work when I get to the stadium, and I suggest slow-cooked dishes prepared ahead of time. The best dishes are those you can cook at home and then add the finishing touches to at the stadium. I think the perfect tailgate food just might be chili. It works well in the fall, because it’s hearty and warms you up in the cool weather. Read more

Beware of Oncoming Eviliciousness

by in Shows, October 31st, 2014

Chefs know that when they compete on Cutthroat Kitchen, they’re subjecting themselves to all manners of ruthless sabotages, but  now it seems that even host Alton Brown will come face-to-face with eviliciousness. Check out the GIF above to see him try to outrun a rolling boulder, and tune in Sunday at 10|9c to see what challenges are in store on an all-new episode of Cutthroat Kitchen.

How to Cook Everything Fast — Off the Shelf

by in Books, October 31st, 2014

How to Cook Everything FastMark Bittman is back, and he’s about to revolutionize the way you eat dinner (again). In his newest cookbook, How to Cook Everything Fast, Bittman promises a better way to cook great food, and he certainly delivers.

The book starts with an introductory section and an overview (The Fast Kitchen) that is a culinary treasure trove of kitchen tips. It features everything from how to use to book to insights on families cooking together. It contains the last shopping list you’ll ever need, complete with details and notes on the ingredients and instructions for their proper storage. He also dispels the need (and the reasoning) for extensive mise en place right up front. The idea is to cook smarter and save yourself time by consolidating steps within the recipe.

Sound confusing? It really couldn’t be simpler to follow, thanks to Bittman’s new recipe layout. In easy-to-follow (color-coded) instructions, Bittman separates cooking actions and prep actions to keep you moving quickly and smoothly through each recipe, without clunky overuse of the word “meanwhile.” The book is broken down into sections featuring Main Dishes and Simpler, Smaller Dishes. Each Main Dish recipe gives suggestions for variations as well as immensely helpful suggestions for side dish pairings. And don’t be fooled; just because the recipes are simple doesn’t mean they aren’t absolutely mouthwatering. Bittman is known for his inventive, practical approach to layering flavors together, and one bite of the Broken Won Ton Soup, Skillet Meat Loaf or Broiled Ziti and you’ll see for yourself. Better yet, try the Fastest Chicken Parmesan at home (recipe below). The book is your one-stop shop for quick, easy, delicious meals, perfect for busy weeknights and activity-filled weekend days and busy families. How to Cook Everything Fast is on sale now, and you can order your copy here.

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Cookbooks for Candy (Yes, Candy)

by in Books, October 30th, 2014

Cookbooks for Candy (Yes, Candy)By Michelle Park

The last couple months of the year are packed with excuses to consume ridiculous amounts of sweets. Why not take full advantage of the season’s sugary spirit and make your own? Homemade candy is a great party trick, and it’s surprisingly straightforward. If you have reservations about thermometers and molten sugar, fear not — the well-versed duos behind this month’s picks will have you caramelizing with confidence.

1. The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook by Liz Gutman and Jen King
Gutman and King, co-founders of the Brooklyn-based candy company Liddabit Sweets, have a love affair with candy. It’s no small task to demystify the art of candy making for the average home cook, but their optimism is contagious. Their playful, extremely thorough cookbook starts with a three-page chart titled Speed Date the Candies, a swift tour of the 75 recipes ahead, so you can quickly find one to fit your needs, whether that’s vegan, fun to make with the kids, or “melt-in-your-mouth-y” (sic) — or all of the above (Chocolate Mint Meltaways). Candy 101 then explains everything you need to know about sugar, chocolate, cleaning, safety and essential equipment. (The equipment section is split into “musts” and “coulds,” and you might find that your kitchen is already equipped to bust out some Pecan Turtle Caramel Corn.) Because Gutman and King want you to remember that “MAKING CANDY IS FUN” from start to finish, these chapters read less like a chemistry textbook and more like a friend discussing softball sugar with you over coffee. As far as the recipes go, no secret is withheld, and they range in difficulty from easy (Buckeyes) to ambitious (Gutman and King’s signature peanut-butter-banana candy bar, aptly named The King) to ambitious and patient (Beer Pretzel Caramels). You can rest easy regardless of what you choose first; “Liz Says” and “Jen Says” bubbles pop up on every other page with additional encouragement, suggestions and troubleshooting tips, should you make any missteps.

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