Tag: All Posts

What to Do with Rotisserie Chicken

by in Recipes, June 21st, 2014

Pulled BBQ Chicken SandwichesThe Kitchen co-hosts, plus a few of their special guests, showed off a next-level contraption that roasts chicken fireside, a la rotisserie chicken, on this morning’s all-new episode. The setup included a central fire pit and multiple hanging birds around the heat, which roasted slowly and became moist and juicy. If you don’t happen to have the tools and space to recreate the scene in your backyard, there’s no shame in picking up a warm rotisserie chicken from the supermarket and putting it to work in quick-fix meals at home. Easy to find and economical, store-bought rotisserie chicken is a weeknight timesaver and perhaps the ultimate shortcut ingredient, as it can be used in countless lunch and dinner recipes. Check out a few of Food Network’s favorite ideas below, then see all of the recipes featured on The Kitchen today.

Once you make a sweet, tangy barbecue sauce, these surprisingly healthy Pulled BBQ Chicken Sandwiches (pictured above) become as simple to make as shredding the meat and assembling. Be sure to not go overboard when adding the liquid smoke; a few drops will go a long way in adding the beloved smoky flavor.

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Grilled Apple Cider Chicken — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, June 20th, 2014

I actually put together my very first grill myself. It took all day and a good deal of patience and persistence. It was a pretty scary moment when I twisted the control on the tank and clicked the ignition. It all worked out and I didn’t blow myself to kingdom come. I love to grill throughout the year, but in the summer it’s just practical to keep the heat out of the kitchen. Burgers and brats are brilliant, and steaks and seafood are stupendous, but my absolute favorite is cheap and cheerful chicken. Read more

My Paris Kitchen — Off the Shelf

by in Books, June 20th, 2014

My Paris Kitchen CookbookThe delightful thing about David Lebovitz’s writing is his ability to make even the most-intimidating foreign cuisine seem approachable and familiar. French cuisine can be overwhelming, especially for home cooks. It’s renowned for its heritage of precision, its delicate balance of flavors and its unwavering high standards for taste and presentation. That’s great for a major holiday dinner, but who has time for fussy food in the middle of the week?

My Paris Kitchen took me by surprise with how unpretentious and inviting its recipes are. Crack open the book to any page and it’s not hard to imagine David taking you calmly by the elbow and strolling you down a Parisian street and into his favorite cheese shop, where you discover how fascinating (and delicious!) seasonal cheeses can be. His style of writing is relaxed, conversational and friendly. You’re just hanging out with a friend, chatting about adding ice to wine, the virtues of a good mortar and pestle, and the miracle that is a perfectly ripe cherry tomato.

The other little something special that sets My Paris Kitchen apart is the fact that some recipes are basic and other recipes will gently guide you outside your culinary comfort zone. David’s inviting writing is almost misleading, in that you’ll be halfway through a recipe you once thought to be way beyond your skill level before you realize how simple French cooking can be if you have the right teacher. And that’s the mark of an exceptional cookbook: It doesn’t just give you better recipes; it helps you become a better cook.

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NFL Players Show Off Big Appetites — for Practical Jokes

by in News, June 20th, 2014

NFL Players Show Off Big AppetitesNFL players have been known to live large and splash out some serious cash on food and drink, especially thanks to a questionable hazing tradition wherein veteran players stick team newbies with whopping dinner tabs.

For example, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant recently told Fox Sports he was forced to fork over $55,000 for dinner with teammates at Pappas Bros. Steakhouse in Texas during his rookie year. Despite the fact that Dez, a first-round pick in 2010, had signed a five-year deal worth $11.8 million, the pressure to pay for his fellow players’ excesses rubbed him the wrong way.

Earlier this month, Philadelphia Eagles offensive tackle Lane Johnson, who was a first-round draft pick in 2013, tweeted a dinner bill from Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House in Philadelphia with the caption “Rookie dinner.” The total damage indicated on that check was a modest-only-by-comparison $17,747 — much of it apparently on Remy Martin Louis XIII cognac ($4,525) and more than a few extremely pricey bottles of Cabernet (one bottle of 2005 Screaming Eagle Cabernet cost $3,495 alone), as well as steaks, seafood and sides. (The “auto gratuity” was calculated at $472.20 — but perhaps the players left some extra cash?)

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What to Watch: Travel with Guy to Find the Best Grilled Meats and Learn Steakhouse Secrets with Bobby

by in Shows, June 20th, 2014

Barbecue Addiction: Bobby's BasicsIt’s grilling season on Food Network, and your favorite hosts are getting ready for a summer of outdoor fun.

On Saturday, check out new episodes of Farmhouse Rules and The Kitchen. Nancy’s bringing in the food for bingo night at her community rec center, and the hosts of The Kitchen are cooking up some delicious rotisserie chicken. Next, Guy goes on a hunt to find the greatest grilled meats in the country on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

On Sunday, Bobby unveils his grilling secrets on a new series called Barbecue Addiction: Bobby’s Basics and Guy invites his pal Jimmy John to create a flavorful fried fish sandwich on Guy’s Big Bite. Next, tune in to three hours of all-new competition with Guy’s Grocery Games, Food Network Star and Cutthroat Kitchen.

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Is Alton’s Mango-Cutting Technique Better Than Yours?

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, June 19th, 2014

In a YouTube video this week, Alton takes on the fruit that is seemingly impossible to cut — the mango. In a comedic parody (including a massive amount of faux blood), Alton walks food fans through two bad ways to cut this fruit, then he describes the best tactic: Remove all the peel from the mango except for two circles in the center of each cheek. Holding this skin for support, you can then slice the mango easily on each side of the seed. The skin will provide a tough grip so you don’t drop the mango and cut yourself.

Alton is of course no stranger to unique mango recipes. He gives mangoes an Indian twist in this Mango Chutney recipe, and he puts them in a tangy Fruit Salad with Vanilla Dressing. He stuffs a curried mango filling into his Pocket Pies, and he dries mangoes in this Dried Fruit recipe for a sweet and healthy snack. Below are five more ways you can incorporate this delectable fruit in your favorite recipes.

1. Give your favorite dip a fruity twist with this Mango Salsa recipe.
Mango Salsa

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A Neon Tie-Dye Surprise Cake That Will Knock ‘Em Dead

by in News, June 19th, 2014

A Neon Tie-Dye Surprise Cake That Will Knock 'Em DeadPeace, love, understanding — and cake? If you’re baking for a Jerry Garcia fan, a preschooler who adores arts and crafts, or just someone who likes colorful surprises, you may find inspiration in this super-cool psychedelic, rainbow tie-dye cake with an unexpected twist, created for Tablespoon.com by Hungry Happenings blogger Beth Jackson Klosterboer. (Beth credits this tie-dye Peace Cake by Sandra Denneler, of Handmade Charlotte, as inspiration.)

The list of ingredients is pretty simple: four boxes of pound cake mix (it’s less susceptible to air bubbles than regular cake mix), eggs, butter, milk, neon food coloring, 28 ounces of fondant in whatever colors appeal to you, and store-bought frosting. And you’ll need two 6-inch x 6-inch x 2-inch baking pans, and a fair number of disposable pastry or Ziploc bags. (For the full tutorial, click here.)

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Refreshing Summer Drinks for the Whole Family — Summer Soiree

by in Drinks, Family, June 19th, 2014

Perfect Homemade Lemonade

These days, instead of taking coffee hot with cream and sugar, most take it with ice cubes. This week and beyond, stick a straw into refreshing, family-friendly summer sips that revitalize any day spent picnicking on the beach, lounging on the patio or eating in the backyard with the whole clan.

Stir together The Pioneer Woman’s Perfect Homemade Lemonade, which achieves a perfect sweet-and-sour bliss point that you can get only from fresh lemon juice and homemade simple syrup. For a fruitier take, add a bag of frozen raspberries and stir. Pour either in a pitcher and you’ll be one step closer to having the most-popular lemonade stand on the block.

Instead of chugging from the soda fountain, make your own sparkling drink at home. Fix Bobby’s Raspberry Ginger Ale by blending chopped fresh ginger, sugar, ice-cold club soda and ripe, juicy raspberries.

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Supermarket Savings: Savvy Ingredient Swaps

by in Recipes, June 19th, 2014

Supermarket Savings: Savvy Ingredient SwapsIf your recipe calls for a fancy ingredient, don’t skip the recipe, simply swap the costly item for another less expensive alternative. Our supermarket expert Nicole Cherie Jones chatted with Beth Moncel, author of Budget Bytes, Gabi Moskowitz of brokeassgourmet.com, Carrie Robinson of thefrugalfoodiemama.com and Amy McCoy, author of Poor Girl Gourmet, to find out how you can save hundreds of dollars at the grocery store and still nail recipes that call for pricey ingredients.

1. Porcini Mushrooms
Porcini mushrooms are pricey at $5 to $8 per ounce, and they’re also elusive. Save up to 95 percent with baby bella (cremini) mushrooms that register at only 38 cents per ounce.

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Calamari Gets a Lighter, Summery Makeover

by in Recipes, Shows, June 18th, 2014

Calamari Stirfry with Peppers and CukesFor this week’s Chopped Dinner Challenge, the chefs of Food Network Kitchen chose to feature the basket ingredient squid. While squid is traditionally deep-fried in breadcrumbs to lock in its natural flavor, this stir-fried version makes use of sweet and tangy ingredients like soy sauce, molasses, lime and ginger to bump up the flavor. Served over chilled rice noodles, this take is a refreshing departure from the heavier classic, making it a cooling retreat for summer dining. Read more