Tag: All Posts

QUIZ: Which Chopped Judge Are You?

by in Shows, March 10th, 2015

Chopped judgesWhen it comes to the judges of Chopped, Tuesdays 10|9c, they definitely have their own distinctive personalities, and it’s most evident just by the way they deliver the bad news to unsuspecting chefs at the chopping block. If you’ve ever found yourself siding with one judge over the other — especially when there’s a heated disagreement pertaining to the correct use of a mystery basket ingredient — you’re not alone. You’ve probably thought to yourself you could easily hang with one of them. Well, now’s your chance to find out with whom you share the most in common.

Take the Quiz Now

When All Else Fails, Make Pasta

by in Recipes, March 10th, 2015

Marinara SauceConsider making that phrase — “when all else fails, make pasta” — your new life mantra. Easy to prepare, inexpensive and a staple in most people’s pantries, pasta is the ultimate oh-man-I-need-dinner-on-the-table-like-right-now meal, and it’s equally adored by kids and adults alike. Perhaps best of all, some of the most-classic sauces require only two or three ingredients, and many don’t even need to be cooked — only warmed with the heat of the pasta — so dinner can be on the table in as little time as it takes to boil a pot of water. Read on below for six pasta staples you’ll want to make again and again.

Make Ina Garten’s Marinara Sauce once, then commit the recipe to memory, because this workhorse of a sauce will save dinnertime over and over again. Simply prepared in one pan but boasting a rich, full flavor, thanks to a splash of red wine and fresh chopped herbs, this sauce will shine atop your family’s favorite noodle, ravioli or tortellini.

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Some Things Get Better with Age: 10 Foods to Eat As Leftovers

by in Recipes, March 9th, 2015

Turkey MeatloafAs the old saying goes, good things come to those who wait. Though fresh, hot meals are put on a pedestal, full-fledged meals beyond wine and cheese get better with age too. In fact, when braised meats, sumptuous stews and hearty casseroles are left to sit in the fridge and cool down for hours or even days, a little magic happens. Flavors meld together as individual ingredients mingle and achieve a more well-rounded flavor.

Before you scarf down an entire dish, slow your roll. These hearty recipes prove that some things are best taken as leftovers, whether you zap them in the microwave or sneak a bite out of the fridge cold.

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Chat with All-Star Academy Mentor Curtis Stone on Facebook

by in Shows, March 9th, 2015

Curtis StoneChef Curtis Stone will be chatting with fans on Facebook this Tuesday, March 10 at 4 p.m. EST. Here’s your chance to ask him your burning questions about the new show All-Star Academy. Go to Food Network’s Facebook page on Tuesday morning to submit your questions, and come back in the afternoon to connect with Curtis.

For more about Curtis and his team, visit the All-Star Academy page. Plus, go behind the scenes of the competition by browsing photos from recently aired episodes and watching clips of the top battles. Watch All-Star Academy on Sundays 9|8c.

Cheese-and-Chile-Stuffed Mushrooms — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, March 9th, 2015

Cheese and Chile-Stuffed MushroomsWhile stuffed mushrooms are surely a fan favorite on the appetizer table, there’s no reason these earthy bites can’t transition into a main dish, especially when you swap out the creminis or baby bellas and opt for full-size portobello mushrooms. The beauty of serving mushrooms in a vegetarian dish is that they’re naturally meaty and filling, so you don’t have to worry about feeling hungry right after dinner. Plus, portobellos can stand up to hearty cooking techniques, like high-heat roasting and grilling, which is why they often shine as burger patties.

In Food Network Magazine’s good-for-you recipe for Cheese-and-Chile-Stuffed Mushrooms (pictured above), these tender, satisfying rounds are layered with a mix of textures and flavors, like gooey mozzarella and a bold mixture of garlicky poblano peppers, green onions and fresh parsley. The secret to ensuring this go-to dinner is especially satisfying is adding a bit of protein-packed wheat germ to the sauteed poblanos, promising a welcome subtle crunch to the overall plate. After they finish baking, top each tender stuffed mushroom with cool sour cream for tang and bright red jalapeno peppers.

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Vote Now in Round 1 of the Chopped at Home Challenge

by in Shows, March 9th, 2015

Round 1 Chopped at HomeChopped fans, starting today (through March 23) you have the chance to vote for the finalist’s dish you’d like to win Round 1 of the Chopped at Home Challenge. The winner will earn the opportunity to compete in the Chopped kitchen at Food Network headquarters for a chance to win $10,000, just like a real Chopped champion.

Get the details on how to vote, how the challenge works and how you can enter upcoming rounds.

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Alton and Antonia at the Stove for Omelets 101 — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, March 8th, 2015

Omelets may seem easy enough to make — after all, it takes just one, maybe two, ingredients to prepare them. But as judge Antonia Lofaso explained to Alton Brown on the host’s all-new Alton’s After-Show tonight, “maybe people don’t actually know what an actual omelet is,” as several Cutthroat Kitchen competitors presented her with scrambles instead. Ever the master of Good Eats, Alton took this opportunity to demonstrate the ins and outs of proper omelet technique, and along with Antonia, he dished out a quality omelet offering. Read on below for their top 10 tips to mastering winning omelets every time, then click the play button on the video above to watch their culinary lesson unfold.

1. “I like three eggs for an 8-inch pan,” Alton told Antonia, who agreed that’s an ideal amount.

2. It’s best to start with room-temperature eggs so it doesn’t take them as long to warm up, noted Alton.

3. “I don’t want to add my salt too early,” Antonia explained as she whisked her eggs. “I want to get a fluff first.” She told Alton that salt could actually start the cooking process of the egg and thus change its color, so it’s best to wait until just before cooking to stir in salt.

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Guy’s Chicken Avocado Egg Rolls — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, March 8th, 2015

Chicken and Avocado Egg RollsWhen it comes to appetizers, a traditional pick like a cheese plate or chips and dip may fill the bill on any ordinary day, but when you’re looking to step up your starter game, look no further than Guy Fieri’s recipe arsenal and this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week. Golden brown and crunchy on the outside with a flavor-packed filling of garlic-ginger chicken and fresh vegetables, plus creamy avocado, Guy’s next-level egg rolls are best served with a sweet chili sauce.

For more party-ready recipes, check out Food Network’s Let’s Cook: Appetizers board on Pinterest.

Get the Recipe: Chicken Avocado Egg Rolls (pictured above)

Join the Breakfast Club with Food Network on Pinterest

by in Recipes, March 8th, 2015

Pinterest Breakfast ClubBefore you even think about pouring milk over another bowl of cereal, maybe it’s time to open up a new tab on your browser. For a limited time, you can hop over to Pinterest to get Food Network’s picks for the best breakfast recipes around. Hey, you probably didn’t need another reason to have a breakfast obsession, but — trust us — these all-about-breakfast ideas are just enough to get you to love the sound of your alarm clock.

Join the club by following Food Network’s breakfast boards (below), and get pinning!

Cereal, Snacks and the “Sugar Game”: What They Mean to My Family

by in Family, Food Network Chef, March 7th, 2015

Cereal, Snacks and the My daughters had been begging me to buy a particular box of cereal for the month of March. In our house, cereal is either healthy enough to be considered a breakfast item (by virtue of low sugar and high protein and fiber), or it is a dessert treat that we buy once a month. This box of cereal was the “dessert” cereal for the month of March. I brought the cereal home today, and the girls cheered with excitement, knowing that dessert tonight would be a bowl of crispy chocolate cereal in cold creamy milk.

I returned to work back in my office. Suddenly I heard a soft knock and saw the eyes of my 7-year-old Margaux peeking through the cracked door. I knew it was important. I stopped my typing and invited Margaux in, with her earnest, somber face. In her little hands, she held the box of chocolate cereal. “Mom, I just checked, and this cereal has 13 grams of sugar. I don’t think it’s very healthy at all.” She was conflicted — a gift of being a reader and being incapable of unseeing what she had read on the label. What followed was a conversation about our health, making balanced choices and reading labels. We brainstormed some options that would enable her to enjoy the cereal sometimes, but without feeling bad about it. (Simply not eating this cereal again, however, was not on the table for Margaux.) We talked about maybe buying a treat cereal less often — perhaps every six weeks — and making the servings a little smaller in order to reduce the sugar. She suggested maybe skipping the piece of candy she is allowed at the movies next time to balance out the sugar. (I don’t hold high hopes for her making good on that one, if I’m honest.)

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