The Very Best Ways to Put In-Season Butternut Squash to Use

by in Recipes, October 6th, 2016

Saffron Risotto with Butternut SquashHere at Food Network, our office CSA loot this week included apples, leeks, sweet potatoes and one in-season vegetable that we’ve been waiting for quite patiently: butternut squash. Innately sweet, hearty and tender, this fall favorite is a stunner in whichever hearty soups, comforting mains and side dishes it becomes a part of. Learn how to break it down, step by step, then use it to make one of our favorite recipes.

Fold tender morsels of roasted butternut squash into a creamy pot of homemade risotto. With over 200 top reviews, Ina Garten’s Saffron Risotto with Butternut Squash is the one to make, as it gets an added layer of flavor from a pinch of saffron threads, plus diced pancetta and grated Parmesan cheese.

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Co-Host of The Kitchen Jeff Mauro Takes Over Food Network’s Snapchat Discover

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, October 6th, 2016

Jeff MauroCo-host of The Kitchen Jeff Mauro seems to be all over Food Network these days, and now he’s taking over Food Network’s Snapchat Discover channel. For the next 24 hours, Jeff will be sharing his sandwich and mealtime tips, his funniest kitchen fails, and an original song.

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“Best. Day. Ever.” — Alton’s Tournament of Terror After-Show

by in Shows, October 5th, 2016

No stranger to Cutthroat Kitchen — or the evilicious escapades it’s been known to dish out to chefs and the judges alike — Antonia Lofaso had every right to be suspicious of a seemingly too-good-to-be-true sabotage during tonight’s new After-Show. Alton Brown introduced her to what he deemed “a little bitty haunted kitchen,” and he set her up with everything she’d need to execute deviled eggs: the ingredients, the tools and the space. But that didn’t stop her from trying to find out the horrors she (rightly) imagined would be there. After all, this was following Heat 2 of the Tournament of Terror, where the situation has been known to take a diabolical turn.

“You’re going to, like, start throwing things at me,” she predicted plainly. “Nothing is going to, like, grab me?” she questioned Alton. “OK, so what are they — what are you going to do?” she asked. “Is there something inside of my egg that shouldn’t be there?” Alton assured her there were no such surprises in store. But that didn’t mean there weren’t other horrors awaiting her. With a swift double knock on the exterior of the contraption, Antonia’s kitchen started to move, beginning its eventual 360- degree rotation right before her eyes. “Stop it! You were supposed to let me know that it was going to do that,” she shrieked as she attempted to grab her quickly falling equipment. Meanwhile, Alton, who was much too pleased with the surprise he pulled off, couldn’t help but smile and say: “Best. Day. Ever.”

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The Only Apple Cider Doughnut Recipe You’ll Ever Need

by in In Season, Recipes, October 5th, 2016

It’s that time of year when apple orchards are as plentiful with fruit as we are with excitement for the onrush of seasonal desserts. As usual, our eyes are on apple cider doughnuts, a fall staple at countless farm stands across the country. Crisp on the outside, chewy on the inside, and finished with a signature coating of cinnamon and sugar, they’re hard to beat after a long day hauling around your handpicked apples.

Not all of us are lucky enough to live near an orchard, but that doesn’t mean we’re willing to forgo a taste of this sweet, in-season commodity. Thankfully, the chefs in Food Network Kitchen have created a simple method for making apple cider doughnuts from scratch. Don’t be daunted by the recipe’s length — it’s a multistep process, but anyone can master it. All you need are two fresh apples (preferably an acidic variety, like Cortland or McIntosh, for doughnuts that are a little bit tart and not excessively sweet), apple cider from the grocery store, vegetable oil for frying, cinnamon and sugar for dusting, and a few kitchen staples – like flour, eggs and buttermilk – for creating the dough.

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Multitalented Lorraine Pascale Got Hungry for Baking and Never Looked Back

by in Behind the Scenes, Shows, October 5th, 2016

Lorraine PascaleLorraine has worn many hats, including those of a model and even a mechanic, but the one that fits her best is that of baker. After working in restaurant kitchens and bakeries in the U.K., she began hosting cooking programs, many of which were based on Lorraine’s best-selling baking books. Stateside, she’s served as a judge on Spring Baking Championship and Holiday Baking Championship. But now she’s offering her talents as a teacher to some of the most-terrible bakers in the country, in the new series Worst Bakers in America. Along with Duff Goldman, Lorraine mentors a team of hopeless hopefuls, with the goal of coaching one to the top of the ranks. With bragging rights on the line against her friend and fellow baker, Duff Goldman, all niceties get pushed aside. It’s a competition, after all.

In this interview with FN Dish, Lorraine reveals her motivation for becoming a baker, what the first dessert was that she made, which talk show queen she’d like to bake for and what keeps her doing what she loves most to this day.

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4 Ways to Make a Cream Cheese Sandwich

by in Recipes, Shows, October 5th, 2016

Cream cheese sandwichesBy Angela Carlos

What do you do when life (or the Chopped Junior mystery ingredient basket) gives you everything doughnuts? Besides enjoying the sweet and savory treat as is, you turn them into cream cheese sandwiches for your lunchbox, of course.

This week’s inspiration for our Chopped Junior-inspired lunchbox came early in the episode, when one of our young contestants scraped the cream cheese topping from a sweet-and-savory doughnut and added the topping to his plate.

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12 Big-Batch Breakfast Ideas That Make Mornings a Breeze

by in Family, Recipes, October 5th, 2016

Cinnamon Baked French ToastWith sweet and savory ideas, this collection of one dozen recipes features kid-approved ways to prep a hearty breakfast ahead of time, so all you need to do in the morning is slice, heat or, in some cases, grab and go.

The Pioneer Woman’s Cinnamon Baked French Toast (pictured above)
I’ve made Ree Drummond’s amazing French Toast for my brood many times, and I love that it’s such a large recipe — it works for at least two breakfasts. I like to prep the whole thing the night before, but I don’t bake it until the morning. When we’re done, I cover the leftovers with foil and store in the fridge for another morning that week. When it’s time to reheat the French toast, set the oven to 350 degrees F, and very slowly pour 1/4 cup of milk right over the top. Replace the foil and bake for about 20 minutes for a second helping! To make it more nutritious, I always use whole-wheat bread and love sprinkling a little wheat germ into the top layer of crumble.

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3 of a Kind: Ube Desserts

by in Restaurants, October 5th, 2016

Ube Ice Cream from 2nd City
By Patty Lee

3 of a Kind checks out three places across the country to try something cool, new and delicious.

With its striking color, a unique flavor and a texture that works in cookies, cakes and other confections, ube — a purple yam native to the Philippines — was destined to become the next dessert sensation. While lavender-hued sweets have recently caught the eye of Instagrammers, the ingredient is more than just a buzzy trend for Filipino chefs. “In any Filipino party, ube would be present at the dessert table alongside leche flan and fruit salad,” says Ginger Lim-Dimapasok, owner of Cafe 86 in Pasadena, Calif. “To those of us who moved to the U.S. from the Philippines, being able to eat ube and to have it be so easily accessible really brings us back to our roots.” As Filipino cuisine rises in popularity, more ube-centric eats are popping up on menus, sometimes in unexpected forms. “It’s inspirational to see how other chefs transform this ingredient very differently from how we’ve always known to eat it growing up,” says Nomad Donuts’ Kristianna Zabala. Here’s how three chefs are currently shining a spotlight on ube.

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Every Kind of Chocolate Chip Cookie You’d Ever Want to Bake

by in Recipes, October 4th, 2016

Cakey Chocolate Chip CookiesAs with most things in life, the “one size fits all” approach doesn’t apply when it comes to cookie baking — especially when we’re talking chocolate chip. There are so many ways this classic comfort-food favorite can vary, whether in its texture (crispy? chewy? cakey?) or in its taste (nutty? extra-chocolatey?). Check out our wide range of crazy-good chocolate chip cookie recipes, and take a peek at our ultimate Chocolate Chip Cookie Guide to bake your best batch every time.


A batter mixed with dark brown sugar alone, rather than the combination of light brown and white sugars that our Classic Chocolate Chip Cookies call for, results in Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies that are delightfully tender.

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Duff Goldman Revels in the Magic of Baking and Reveals Why He Decided to Become a Baker

by in Behind the Scenes, Shows, October 4th, 2016

Duff GoldmanWhen Duff Goldman first appeared on Food Network on Ace of Cakes, we originally knew him as the owner of a small cake shop in Baltimore that put out some pretty inventive and over-the-top sweets. Since then he’s expanded his business to Los Angeles, and we’ve gotten to see the inner workings of his studio — and meet his exceptionally creative staff — on Duff Till Dawn and Cake Masters. More recently Duff has also lent his expertise as a judge to Spring Baking Championship and Holiday Baking Championship, and he’s served as a co-host and judge on Kids Baking Championship. But now Duff has taken on the role of teacher on Worst Bakers in America, airing Sundays at 10|9c. He’s paying forward all he’s learned by mentoring a set of bumbling baking wannabees, from which he hopes to train a winner.

So why did Duff end up becoming a baker, and what inspires him about his craft? FN Dish caught up with the cake-baker extraordinaire on the set of Worst Bakers to chat about his baking philosophy and the ups and downs he’s gone through in his career to get to where he is today.

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