Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, September 7th, 2014

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip CookiesEven though it’s still technically summer, with the Labor Day holiday come and gone, the shift from light, bright warm-weather foods to autumn’s hearty meals and comforting flavors has started. If you’re already craving the classic tastes of fall, look no further than this week’s Most Popular Pin of the WeekPumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies.

These surprisingly healthy treats are laced with fragrant spices like ground cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger, and thanks to the use of canned pumpkin puree, they’re a cinch to prepare too. Best of all, these chocolate-studded bites are ready to eat in just over 30 minutes.

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Best 5 Hash-Brown Recipes

by in Recipes, September 7th, 2014

Hash Brown CasseroleWhen it comes to lazy weekends, few things are more welcomed than long, leisurely breakfasts, and with that indulgence surely comes a host of sweet and savory morning classics, like French toast, waffles, eggs, bacon and hash browns. The beauty of hash browns is that the dish can be a version of anything from the rustic simplicity of shredded spuds to a dressed-up potato casserole with fresh veggies. No matter if you like your spuds tender, crispy, sweet or fried, check out Food Network’s top-five hash-brown recipes below to find a mix of classic and creative twists on this morning mainstay, and learn new ways to put the everyday potato to work at your breakfast table.

5. Hash-Browns Makeover — Food Network Kitchen relies on a mixture of shredded parsnips and potatoes to achieve lighter results in its scallion-studded hash browns.

4. Sweet Potato Hash Browns with Green Onion Vinaigrette — Bobby Flay’s big-batch hash browns feature diced sweet potatoes instead of shredded russets, and they’re tossed with caramelized onions and a tangy green onion-Dijon dressing.

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Everything You Need to Know About Pecorino

by in How-to, September 6th, 2014

Everything You Need to Know About PecorinoFor many people who see their favorite chef grating salty slivers of it over a plate of perfectly cooked pasta or a New Haven-style pizza, pecorino cheese has become almost interchangeable with Parmesan.
There is so much more to this beautiful, traditionally crafted cheese than just being an alternative garnish, however, and I hope that after reading this, you will not only realize just how much hard work goes into getting pecorino to your table, but you will also be tempted to make it a star ingredient in some of your future culinary endeavors.

What Is Pecorino?
The name pecorino is actually taken from the Italian word pecora, which means “sheep.” It links back to a time when sheep were an essential source of food and materials for rural families in what is now Italy. And the first historical records of the cheese being made come from nearly 2,000 years ago, in the works of the Roman writer Pliny the Elder.

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Poll: What’s for Breakfast on School Days?

by in Recipes, September 6th, 2014

Mixed Berry and Yogurt ParfaitNow that school is back in session, the late-morning breakfasts of summer are surely a thing of a past, and they’ve likely been replaced with a frenzied half hour of packing lunches, gathering supplies to toss into backpacks and tying shoes at the door. But while there may be hardly any time to sit down to extravagant breakfasts on hectic weekday mornings, it’s nevertheless important for little ones to leave the house with full tummies so they can begin to make the grade. When time is tight at your house on school days, what dishes do you reach for to feed your kids? Are you a fan of assemble-and-eat picks like a Mixed Berry and Yogurt Parfait (pictured above), or do you rely on last night’s prep work to save the day, as it does with Alton’s Overnight Oatmeal? When it comes to eggs, do you opt for hard-boiled beauties, or do prefer them scrambled?

Cast your vote below to tell FN Dish what’s for breakfast at your house on school days.

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How to Shop Your Pantry, Plus 3 Weeknight Dinners to Master

by in Family, Food Network Chef, September 6th, 2014

Melissa d'ArabianMy kids have been in school for exactly four days. Which is about how long it took to remind me that the summer routine of winging it for dinner won’t work anymore. Gone are the afternoons of lazily brainstorming dinner ideas at 5 p.m. from the comfort of a pool lounge chair (“grilled salmon or chicken, sweetie?”). In September, 5 p.m. without a dinner plan wreaks havoc on the delicate soccer-school-homework-ballet ecosphere of our home.

Anyone out there relate? What do you do?

Some common strategies: Race around like a madwoman cobbling together something – anything – that will feed the hungry bellies around the table, letting nutrition take a break for one tiny night. (Anyone?) Go to the drive-thru, or order delivery. Serve cereal (again).

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How Much Would You Pay for These Chocolate Bathroom Fixtures?

by in News, September 5th, 2014

Chocolate BathEven the most devoted chocophiles among us may not rush to splash out $23,240 on a toilet made of chocolate, but we may be gratified to know that, if the urge struck, we could.

The self-described “chocoholics” behind U.K.-based online retailer Bathrooms.com are offering a 980,000-calorie loo as part of a 100-percent-Belgian-chocolate bathroom suite that also includes a $11,620 chocolate bidet (210,000 calories), $14,940 chocolate sink (210,000 calories) and – the piece de resistance – an $82,990 chocolate bathtub (8 million calories!). They’re all available individually or as a set ($132,790) by special request via Bathroomsweets.com.

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Baked Corn Pudding — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, September 5th, 2014

Corn has been part of the American kitchen since Colonial days, as it was a hardy crop, relatively easy to grow and resistant to insects. It was a staple of the Native American diet long before the first settlers arrived and quickly became part of the settlers’ diet. It had a long harvest that extended over a longer period of time than wheat and was cultivated extensively from New England to Georgia. There’s also a long history of corn in the hills and valleys of Appalachia, as corn was better suited to the mountainous terrain than wheat or barley. Corn was eaten fresh in the summer and dried into meal for the winter months. Practicality guided it to find its way in some form, sweet or savory, into breakfast, lunch and dinner.

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52 Weeks Fresh: End-of-Summer Lovin’

by , September 5th, 2014

Pizza SaucePlants worked hard all summer to deliver varied flavors, shapes and colors. Now it’s time to cook your bounty.

A garden row of seedlings at the season’s start should now be a greenmarket. If you’ve been following along this summer, you’ll have everything you need for pizza sauce (tomatoes, basil, thyme, oregano, onions) and salads (lettuce, arugula, red onions, edible flowers and beets).

This is the time to use your fresh tomatoes in lieu of canned tomatoes in any marinara or basic tomato sauce. Try Giada De Laurentiis’ version with carrots, celery and a bay leaf, or make Chuck Hughes’ classic pizza sauce. To make the substitution, use 10 to 12 blanched tomatoes in place of a 32-ounce can.

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