Quick Dorm-Room Meals

by , August 20th, 2014

CerealAdjusting to dorm life from the comforts of home (and a fully stocked and equipped kitchen) can be a rough transition for college-aged foodies. But with just a few tools and a basic pantry, you can whip up satisfying meals for any time of the day or night.

Breakfasts
This whole-grain hot cereal (pictured above) uses bulgur and barley with oats to make an extra hearty and nutritious breakfast. Think about mixing a bigger batch of the cereal so it’s ready to use in an instant. For a cold alternative, mix a whole-grain, low-sugar dry cereal (Cheerios and Bran Flakes are two classic, good choices) with plain yogurt, fresh or dried fruit, a handful of nuts and a splash of lowfat milk. It will keep you fueled for hours.

If you’re in a hurry, try instant oatmeal cooked with lowfat milk and topped with peanut butter and banana, or top rye crisp crackers with mashed avocado and hard-boiled egg slices.

Read more

Brush Up on Your Restaurant Cellphone Etiquette (Please!)

by in News, August 20th, 2014

Restaurant Cellphone EtiquetteWe may not always be proud of it, but many of us spend our lives glued to our smartphones: texting friends, keeping up with news, making sure our bosses don’t need us right this very second. We’ve become so attached to those alluring little screens, in fact, that we often forget to stop and smell the coffee — or interact with our server — when we dine in restaurants.

Think no one notices when you surreptitiously reach for your phone in those quiet moments after you first sit down, when you’re probably supposed to be looking at your menu, or while you’re waiting for your food to arrive or your friend to come back from the bathroom — or even when you’re in the middle of your meal? Guess what? Someone notices. That person is your server.

Read more

Top Breakfast Spots in Chicago

by in Food Network Magazine, Restaurants, August 20th, 2014

Top Breakfast Spots in ChicagoOn Sept. 20, Food Network is throwing the ultimate end-of-summer bash: an outdoor food and music festival in Chicago. With today’s top chefs and big musical artists like John Mayer and Phillip Phillips, it’s sure to be a delicious experience worth the travel.

The event officially starts at 11:30am with lunch, so concertgoers will be on their own for breakfast, which isn’t a bad thing at all considering the countless great restaurants in the area. To narrow down the best options, we enlisted the help of Food Network chefs. From old-school diners to five-star hotels, here are Chicago’s best breakfast spots. (Just try to save some of your appetite for all of the gourmet hot dogs, award-winning burgers and other mouthwatering eats at the festival.)

Geoffrey Zakarian: The Drake Hotel

Anne Burrell: I love going to The Palace Grill [Sandwich Shop]. They have the best breakfast, and the owner, George, has even better jokes!

Read more

This App Keeps Track of Your Perishable Foodstuffs

by , August 20th, 2014

One of the worst feelings in the world has to be taking a big, late night swig of milk, only to find out that it is chunkier than cottage cheese and smellier than brie. In other words, it sure is hard to keep track of all of the perishables in our refrigerators. A just-released app seeks to take on this modern problem, using the magic of technology to save us from ourselves.

It’s appropriately called The Fridge and it seems simple enough. You input perishables when they go into the refrigerator and the app will let you know, via messages, when it’s time to let them go. It also acts as a spoilage encyclopedia of sorts, letting you know the average time it takes all of your favorite foods to turn into your favorite poisons.

The app is $1.99 and available right now. However, The Fridge is currently only available for iOS users. Sorry Droid-heads.

Move Over, Competitors; the Chopped Judges Are Cooking After Hours

by in Shows, August 20th, 2014

Chopped After HoursNeedless to say, the judges on Chopped know a thing or two about cooking, so watching from the sidelines gives them a unique perspective on the competition. With Food Network’s exclusive Web series Chopped After Hours, they have the opportunity to leave behind the judging table and cook with the same mystery basket ingredients that have sent competitors home. On Tuesday, August 26 at 11|10c, Chopped After Hours is coming to television in a special episode.

Read more

“This Is Not the Little Piggy That Went to Market” — Chopped After Hours

by in Shows, August 19th, 2014


The Chopped judges have always had their place behind the judging table, but when there’s an opportunity like After Hours, allowing them to come out from behind and get in the kitchen, they’re happier than pigs in mud. Ted points out that “rather than watching from the sidelines, complaining about other people’s cooking,” the judges can be front and center. But Scott doesn’t leave it at that, and he jokes, “Now it gives people the opportunity to complain about our cooking.” But considering how great the basket is, they’re more excited than usual to get cooking: “I’m dying to cook this. I’m really antsy and raring to go,” he says.

“This is not the little piggy that went to market,” says Ted. “This is the star of our food truck and food cart entree round.” Amanda, Aarón and Scott are taking on the ingredients from tonight’s episode: whole suckling pig, fiddlehead ferns, kebab sauces and corn tortillas. All the judges are excited to work with the basket, as Amanda points out, “because there are so many options.” Scott, though, jokes that Aarón is probably going to make tacos because there are tortillas — and, well, Scott’s right.

Read more

Mystery Diners Moves to a New Time

by in Shows, August 19th, 2014

Mystery DinersFans of the hidden-camera show Mystery Diners can now find host Charles Stiles and his crew of secret diners on Wednesdays at 9|8c. In its seventh season, the show takes viewers behind the scenes of problematic restaurants as Charles investigates everything from thefts to just improper behavior, all caught on camera for the owners to see. This Wednesday, tune in for an all-new episode as two food truck operators try to figure out what’s been happening to their businesses, and it’s all been taking place under their noses.

Read more

Dinner Rush! Spatchcocked Grilled Chicken

by , August 19th, 2014

Gather ’round and silence your chuckles because today’s lesson is all about spatchcocking. And it’s going to add some serious A-game cred to your run-of-the-mill grilled chicken.

Pronounced just like it’s spelled, this butchery technique enables a chicken to be flat as it’s cooked. The presentation is beautiful and the cooking time on a whole chicken is cut down by a third, if not more. To spatchcock a bird, place it breast-side down on a cutting board. Using a knife or kitchen shears, cut straight up both sides of the backbone from the cavity to the neck (the backbone can be discarded or added to stock).

Open the bird like a book, exposing the inner cavity, and cut down both sides of the pointed, opaque piece of cartilage that runs between the breasts. Flip it over so it’s breast-side up and press down firmly on the breasts until you hear a pop. Turn the bird over once more and remove the breastbone and opaque piece of cartilage that you previously trimmed around. Discard both pieces.

Read more

3 Creative Ways The Pioneer Woman Uses a Cast-Iron Skillet

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, August 19th, 2014

The Eggbert's SunriserLong-lasting and relatively inexpensive to purchase, cast-iron skillets are perhaps the ultimate workhorses in the kitchen, as they can move from the stove to the oven and they maintain heat extremely well. Sizzling rib-eye steaks and whole roast chickens may be two of the most-common dishes prepared in these all-purpose pans, but the culinary range of these rustic mainstays goes beyond meaty dinners, as Ree Drummond has showed during the more than seven seasons of The Pioneer Woman. From sweet treats to baked breads, Ree’s proved that there’s practically no limit to what can be prepared in cast-iron skillets. Read on below to learn which unexpected treats she’s making with her vast collection of cast-iron skillets, and get her recipes for savory and sweet favorites.

Breakfast:
Think beyond the griddle when it comes to the most-important meal of the day, and embrace the cast-iron skillet with Ree’s The Eggbert’s Sunriser (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine. A next-level take on hash, this hearty morning meal features layer upon layer of flavor, including salty ham, tender sauteed peppers and satisfying potatoes. Finish with eggs and your favorite salsa for added taste and texture.

Read more