How to Rise Above Bread for 8 Days of Passover

by in Recipes, View All Posts, April 16th, 2014

Salmon with Baby Artichokes

Last night marked the last of this year’s Passover Seders. If you’re celebrating, that means your first shards of matzo and bowls of matzo ball soup are behind you. But what happens between now and the big break on the eighth day? Zapping matzo pizza in the microwave may hold you over for the first couple days, but it won’t be long before you start craving something more. This year, load up on spring veggies and hearty proteins for dynamic, satisfying meals that leave nothing to miss. That way, you can make it till the end without a carb-craving meltdown — or a matzo-induced belly ache. Read more

No More Soggy Burger Buns and KFC for the Prom

by in News, April 16th, 2014

Killer Inside Out Burger with Worcestershire Tomato KetchupConscientious Eating: Are you paying too little for ethnic food? Food writer Sarah Henry makes a persuasive case that you just might be. “Mom-and-pop shops and divey diners repping diverse cultures from around the world, slinging seriously tasty stuff for a fraction of the price it costs — and the effort it takes — to make at home” are a “cornerstone of city living,” she notes in Edible San Francisco. However, as we “bite into that banh mi with mystery meat or chow down on Chinese dumplings made by kitchen hands who may earn less than minimum wage,” we may be turning too blind an eye to the “provenance of raw materials or exploitation of food service people, many of them immigrants or people of color.” Sarah asks, “Who cares what goes on behind the kitchen door when food this cheap tastes so good?” We all should, she says. [Edible San Francisco]

Lettuce, Mayo … no Mat: Subway fans who’d prefer to enjoy their sandwiches without azodicarbonamide — a bleaching chemical used in the fast food chain’s bread that, though approved by the Food and Drug Administration and widely used in food products, has sparked concern because it is also used in yoga mats and shoe rubber — rejoice. The eatery says the ingredient will be removed from its bread by next week. Though some food scientists insist the ingredient is not harmful, Subway was apparently feeling pressured by the public outcry. “You see the social media traffic, and people are happy that we’re taking it out, but they want to know when we’re taking it out,” Tony Pace, Subway’s chief marketing officer, told the Associated Press. “If there are people who have that hesitation, that hesitation is going to be removed.” [AP]

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The Kitchen Co-Hosts Look Back on Season 1 and Preview What’s Ahead

by in Shows, April 15th, 2014

Jeff Mauro, Geoffrey Zakarian, Sunny Anderson, Marcela Valladolid and Katie LeeJust a few months ago, five of your favorite Food Network chefs came together on The Kitchen to celebrate what is arguably the most-important room in the home. Now after a premiere season jam-packed with an over-the-top snackadium, special guest chefsTool Takedowns and one unforgettable Double Provolone, Geoffrey, Jeff, Katie, Marcela and Sunny are gearing up for a second round of go-to recipes for eats and drinks, timesaving cooking strategies and kid-friendly meal solutions. FN Dish was on the set of The Kitchen recently and we caught up with the group as they looked back on their most-memorable moments from early episodes and revealed what’s to come in new episodes, beginning this Saturday at 11a|10c.

For many of the co-hosts, the top unforgettable moment was when Jeff donned a sandwich-themed bodysuit to perform an impromptu routine he called The Double Provolone for Brian Boitano. “I mean, I saw it on the monitor ’cause I wasn’t actually in that segment, but I was crying I was laughing so hard,” Marcela admitted. Jeff and Katie, too, recounted that scene, Jeff deeming it “very risky” and Katie saying simply, “That was special.”

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Best 5 Easter Ham Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, April 15th, 2014

Roasted Fresh Ham with Cider GlazeThe beauty of a ham is that, like a Thanksgiving turkey, it’s a big-batch entree that can feed all of your holiday guests at once, so there’s no need to prepare individual servings of dinner. But also like a turkey, ham needs a bit of dressing up before it’s ready to take center stage at your Easter feast, and in most recipes that next-level addition comes in the form of a glaze. Sweet, spicy, tangy or nearly anywhere in between, glazes complement the natural richness of ham and can play to your guests’ tastes. Check out Food Network’s top-five Easter hams below to find wow-worthy recipes that are a cinch to prepare from Trisha, Melissa, Ina and more chefs.

5. Baked Ham with Brown Sugar-Honey Glaze — Made with just two ingredients — brown sugar and honey — Trisha’s fuss-free glaze tops the ham well into the cooking process, so the sugars don’t burn before the meat is cooked.

4. Ginger-Peach-Glazed Ham — Food Network Magazine recommends letting the ham chill in a ginger-spiced brine for at least 24 hours before cooking it and finishing it with a sweetened Dijon topping.

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12 Easter Ideas for Kids

by in Family, Holidays, April 15th, 2014

12 Easter Ideas for KidsWith just enough spring sun to warm their little cheeks, Easter is one of the sweetest days of the year for kids — and these are some of our favorite ways to celebrate. We’ve got surprisingly simple cookies, cupcakes, brownies and even a few sugar-free options. Here’s to a happy Easter ahead!

1. Easter Bunny Cake: Complete with coconut “fur,” this bunny cake is surprisingly simple to make (hint: It starts with a boxed cake mix!)

2. Little Lamb Pull-Apart Cupcakes: As a busy mom of three small fries, I love the idea of a specially shaped dessert I can actually make. Starting with a simple batch of 24 cupcakes, this recipe lays out exactly how to do it.

3. Giant Easter Egg Cookie: Another crowd-pleaser for busy cooks, this awesome egg can be as easy as baking a batch of store-bought cookie dough.

4. Hard-Boiled-Egg Chicken Family (pictured above): The lengthiest step in this easy creation is boiling the eggs. If you’ve got the eggs, a carrot and a few chia seeds, you can do this one in minutes.

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Why Matzo Isn’t Tasteless and Other Interesting Facts

by in News, April 14th, 2014

Throwdown's Matzo Ball SoupPassover kicked off on Monday night, with Jews all around the world sitting down to break matzo — the unleavened “bread of affliction” that commemorates the Jews’ speedy exodus from Egypt, from slavery to freedom, more than 3,000 years ago — with family and friends at the traditional festival meal known as the Seder. Tonight, the second Seder will take place, and for those keeping the Passover tradition, matzo (not to mention matzo balls and matzo ball soup) will become a staple of their diets for the bread-free duration of the eight-day holiday. Here are a few quick clicks about the humble, flat cracker:

Don’t Call It Tasteless: Dan Pashman, creator of the food podcast The Sporkful and co-host of the Cooking Channel Web series Good to Know, is a fervent defender of matzo. “In a typical cracker you kind of have one or two options,” he tells NPR’s The Salt. Either it will be “crunchy but … also be very oily and salty,” or it will be like a “table water cracker, which is plain in flavor, but very flimsy” without a lot of crunch. Matzos, however, are both plain and crunchy. “It’s like a blank canvas,” Dan says; it’s a welcome base for any number of toppings. Dan also says “the degree of charring” differentiates one sort of matzo from another, and the holes are key as well. “There’s a lot of science behind those holes,” he says. [NPR's The Salt]

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Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs

by in Holidays, How-to, April 14th, 2014

Perfect Hard Boiled EggsDissolving little tablets of dye into vinegar-spiked water and dipping hard-boiled eggs into the bowls was a rite of passage growing up. For my own children, though, it’s a foreign experience. It’s a myth you might say, like the Easter Bunny himself. We actually ate the cooked eggs growing up, and while egg salad was never my thing, I did love eating the freshly peeled eggs with a sprinkling of salt. It’s still my favorite way to enjoy them, with my Mediterranean Tuna Salad coming in as a close second.

My girls aren’t fans of eating hard-boiled eggs, though, regardless of how they’re prepared. Because one woman can eat only so many hard-boiled eggs, we usually skip the whole ritual. This year we’re mixing things up for the Easter holiday and driving to Toronto to celebrate with friends. Egg coloring will be in full swing. The girls will get to dip, tie-dye and color away, and I’ll be ready with some of my favorite recipes to put all those leftover Easter treasures to delicious use.

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Shortcut Moroccan Vegetable Tagine with Couscous — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, April 14th, 2014

Shortcut Moroccan Vegetable Tagine with CouscousSoups and stews often get a bad rap as far as quick-fix meals are concerned, as the thought has been that they take hours of slow-simmering to achieve the fullest flavor. But with the help a few foolproof methods and go-to ingredients, it’s surely possible to turn out simple, ready-to-eat dishes in a flash.

Food Network Kitchen transformed the traditional slow-and-low tagine, a classic Moroccan stew, into a weeknight-friendly staple in its recipe for Shortcut Moroccan Vegetable Tagine with Couscous (pictured above). In place of meat, which may take hours to break down, this fuss-free supper lets vibrant vegetables, like tomatoes and butternut squash, shine, as they can become deliciously tender in mere minutes. Much like classic recipes, this one also boasts a mix of bold, warm spices — cinnamon and cumin — plus a bit of harissa for heat as well as chickpeas and chewy raisins for texture. For added freshness, sprinkle fragrant cilantro atop the tagine before serving, and round out the meal with fluffy couscous.

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