Strip Steak — Iron Chef America Ingredients 101

by in Shows, July 9th, 2012

battle strip steak
If I am ever asked to name my favorite cut of beef, my first answer will not be strip steak. I will probably offer up a beautifully marbled bone-in rib-eye as my cow part of preference.

I know that for many people in the United States, however, the strip steak, under its many different names, is the beef cut of choice, particularly when it comes to finding a perfect steak to place on the grill during the summer months.

Having seen the Iron Chef and his competitor turn their attention to strip steak, I am definitely willing to be convinced that I should give this popular cut another try.

What is strip steak?

A strip steak is a cut of beef taken from the short loin of the cow. This is at the top and the middle of the animal, before the rump. The short loin itself comprises two muscles: the tenderloin (from where you get filet mignon) and the top loin, which gives us the strip steak.

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Go (Brown) Bananas!

by , July 9th, 2012
banana muffins

Mini Banana Muffins

I don’t know about you, but I cherish brown bananas. Not for my cereal. Not banana splits. Not even for smoothies. I weave the soft, sweet gems into the best banana muffins you’ve ever tasted.

If you buy bananas a lot, you’v...

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Broccoli-Cheddar Pockets — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, July 9th, 2012


Similar to a calzone, sandwich pockets consist of a light, delicate dough that’s filled with any number of sweet or savory combinations and baked in the oven. Food Network Magazine’s Broccoli-Cheddar Pockets (pictured above) are an easy, cheesy dinner solution that can be made in just 35 minutes. To prepare, roll out store-bought bread dough, stuff with a vegetarian mixture of blanched broccoli, sour cream, shredded cheddar and chives, and then bake until the pastry is crispy and golden brown. Check out this step-by-step photo gallery to find out the best way to fold the dough and prevent ingredient leakage. These hand-held beauties are a sure-fire way to get picky eaters to enjoy veggies, so try experimenting with other good-for-you fillings.

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Seafood Fest — Weekend Cookout

by in Recipes, July 7th, 2012


This summer, Food Network’s Grilling Central is packed with recipes for the entire family’s taste buds, boasting the best in burgers, dogs, chicken and more all season long. But with so many recipes, where do you start? Each Saturday, FN Dish is giving you a complete menu that is stress-free, and this weekend’s dishes are all about seafood.

One of the easiest pieces of seafood to grill, salmon is a versatile, healthful fish that requires little cooking or prep time. It’s sturdy and firm enough that it won’t fall apart on the grill, yet it’s tender, flaky and mild in flavor. To make Food Network Magazine’s Moroccan Grilled Salmon(pictured above), marinate center-cut salmon fillets in a yogurt-garlic-cumin mixture and cook them for just a few minutes on each side. The plain yogurt will keep the fish moist and add subtle richness to its taste. Serve this dish with an Italian-style starter of crispy fried squid and a side of Crab Boil Potato Salad (pictured right), made with in-season corn, succulent crabmeat and fresh lemon juice, to complete your seafood spread.

Get the entire menu

Healthy No-Cook Summer Recipes

by , July 7th, 2012

This may look like fettuccine, but it's actually just sliced zucchini!

During the summer months, I try to refrain from doing anything that might unnecessarily heat up my tiny apartment – that means not charging my laptop overnight, not using my...

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Unforgettable Fruit Salads

by , July 6th, 2012

fruit salad
We’ve all been there. After slaving away over a sticky cutting board, cutting pear after strawberry after apple, the fruit salad of our dreams is left with the dregs of cantaloupe and honeydew stranded in the bowl, never to grace a plate. Each fru...

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Blueberry Frozen Yogurt — The Weekender

by in Entertaining, Recipes, July 6th, 2012

blueberry frozen yogurt
When I was 7 years old, my parents’ best friends opened a frozen yogurt business. Their store took plain yogurt and swirled in different fruits, bits of candy and sauces to make your ideal frozen treat. To a kid, having this kind of access to dessert was magical, and my sister and I would regularly beg to be taken to the shop on weekends and summer evenings (where they’d give us extra toppings and overflowing cups of yogurt).

Sadly, the flow of frozen yogurt soon ended when my family moved from Los Angeles to Portland, Ore. Not only did we leave our friends’ shop behind, the cooler climate of the Pacific Northwest wasn’t nearly as welcoming to frozen yogurt as Southern California; frozen yogurt suddenly became quite hard to come by.

Still, thanks to that early conditioning, I’ve had a lifelong affinity for frozen yogurt. I’ve enjoyed the recent resurgence of shops selling the stuff in six or eight flavors, but I always wonder exactly what they’re putting in there to make it taste just like white chocolate or strawberries and cream.

Recently, with these concerns about what I was eating, I decided to try my hand at making my own frozen yogurt. I dug around for a recipe that used simple ingredients and found this one for Blueberry Frozen Yogurt from the Neelys. It features Greek yogurt, blueberries, lemon juice and just enough sugar to cut the tartness. It’s so tasty, it takes me right back to the frozen yogurt of my childhood and is perfect for The Weekender.

Before you start blending your berries, read these tips