On the Blogs: A Day in the Life of Bob Tuschman, Goat’s Meat and the New Foodspotting

by in View All Posts, February 9th, 2012

bob tuschman

  • The Huffington Post: Being a Star judge and a Food Network executive is not as glamorous as you might think.
  • Tasting Table:  Don’t forget dessert. Presenting 2012′s best pastry chefs from across the country and their breathtaking sugar creations.
  • ABC News: Walmart’s decision to simplify healthy choices for consumers with “Great for You” labels has nutritionists skeptical.
  • Wall Street Journal: You like goat cheese, but how about goat meat? Find out if you’ll like it and why it’s becoming more popular among chefs.
  • PCWorld: The popular food app Foodspotting gets a revamp and becomes something more useful for your taste buds.

Five-Spice Powder — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, February 9th, 2012

roast beef tenderloin
It’s all about harmony and yin-yang.

Which sounds tritely New Age-y, but really is the key to Chinese cuisine.

Because as with so much of Asian cooking, the blend of seasonings known as five-spice powder is intended to trigger a sense of balance in the mouth and nose.

How? A careful selection of spices that simultaneously hit notes of warm and cool, sweet and bitter, savory and searing.

Because that’s what you get with five-spice powder, a mix of fennel seeds, cinnamon, cloves, star anise and Sichuan peppercorns.

Like spice blends around the world, the proportions of those ingredients vary by region in China, but some variant of it is used throughout the country.

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Best 5 Pork Tenderloin Recipes

by in Recipes, February 8th, 2012


Much like chicken, pork is a hefty meat that can handle the robust flavors and textures of any number of dry rubs, marinades, stuffings and more. When it comes to shopping for pork tenderloins, you have a few options. You can pick up a single, multi-pound tenderloin or look for several longer, skinnier ones that each hover around one pound. Fix your family a dinner of tender, juicy pork using Food Network’s top five pork tenderloin recipes, which are an ideal mix of classic and creative preparations.

5. Pork Tenderloin With Seasoned Rub (pictured above) — Equal parts garlic powder, oregano, thyme, cumin and coriander complete Ellie’s herbaceous dry rub.

4. Mushroom-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin — Sautéed cremini mushrooms, breadcrumbs and garlic are easily stuffed in butterflied tenderloins.

Get the top three recipes »

Nuts About Pistachios

by , February 8th, 2012
pistachios

Pistachios are wonderful on their own, but they make a great appetizer when drizzled with honey and served with apples and cheese.

No other nut boasts an emerald hue like the pistachio does. Find out what you’re getting when you crack open a pistac...

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How to Make a Chocolate Bowl

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, February 8th, 2012

Chocolate Bowl
Chocolate lovers won’t just lick these bowls clean — they’ll eat them whole. To make some yourself, temper one pound semisweet chocolate. Dip the top of a partially inflated balloon in the chocolate, flip the balloon back up and twirl it to distribute the chocolate. Hold the balloon upright and let dry for about a minute. Repeat the dipping process two more times, then spoon some melted chocolate onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and center the balloon, bowl-side down, on the melted chocolate base. Repeat with more balloons, reheating the chocolate as needed (1 pound chocolate will make 4 to 6 small bowls). Refrigerate until hard, about 1 hour, then pop the balloons and peel them away. Store the bowls in a cool, dry place for up to three days.

Photograph by James Wojcik

Stuck in a Carrot Rut? — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in Family, In Season, February 7th, 2012

ginger carrot soup
Something happened a few weeks ago while I was at the farmers’ market. As I scanned the stands, looking over the slim produce pickings here in the Northeast, I decided to get to the root of the problem — root vegetables, that is. It’s February, and we’re knee-deep in parsnips, turnips and potatoes. How I long for the first green cylinders of zucchini and sweet pods of green peas. Soon enough, asparagus.

Since I can’t get in a time machine and fast forward to spring, I decided it was time to get creative and work with what I had before me. Into my bag went a big bundle of carrots. Then they sat in the bin for a week. A whole week — thank heavens root vegetables are resilient and forgiving. I originally picked them up since they’re one of my daughters’ favorite vegetables. The problem is I tend to fall back on standard serving ideas, like simply roasting them or cutting into sticks to pair with dip. Not bad, but certainly a one-way ticket to boredom if done too frequently.

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Trisha Yearwood Coming to Food Network

by in Shows, February 6th, 2012

trisha yearwoodGrammy-winning country singer and best-selling cookbook author Trisha Yearwood is bringing her family-inspired recipes and Southern hospitality to Food Network this spring. Although the six-episode daytime series is still untitled, the author of “Georgia Cooking in an Oklahoma Kitchen” and “Home Cooking with Trisha Yearwood” will invite viewers into her kitchen for her favorite meals and beloved family stories starting April 14.

Each episode is themed to showcase Trisha’s down-home recipes with her friends and family. Sit in on Sunday supper or watch as she plans a family reunion barbecue in Nashville.

Tell us: Will you watch Trisha’s new series?

Tune in: Premieres Saturday, April 14 at 10:30 am Eastern/ 9:30 am Central