Squeezed in the Middle

by in Entertaining, How-to, July 5th, 2012

key lime ice cream sandwiches
Growing up as I did in a house filled with junk food, I had many options. Cookies lined the shelves, each vying for my attention, screaming “Pick me!”

Passing over crunchy chocolate chip, I would quickly made my way to the sandwich cookies. Nutter Butters were my all-time favorites. So much so that my homemade variety appears on the cover of my upcoming cookbook.

I waited all year for Girl Scout cookie season, particularly for the Do-Si-Dos. I’m not sure if it’s the cookies or the filling that I love more. If I had to choose, I would say it’s those soft, peanut-buttery middles.

Baking cookies from scratch allows you to think outside the cookie box for filling ideas. Of course, there is the classic cream filling (think the “stuff” of Oreos), which you can make at home by creaming three simple ingredients: butter, powdered sugar and vanilla. I love adding citrus zest, espresso powder, cocoa nibs or even peanut butter for a twist. Heck, you can even fold in Cap’n Crunch cereal. The beauty of a filled cookie is there are endless possibilities.

Read more

On the Blogs: Hotter Dogs, 10,000 Free Tacos and Food Fashion

by in Community, July 5th, 2012

hot dogNation’s Restaurant News: It’s National Hot Dog Month and the American classic is getting vamped up.

Eater: Don’t have a Taco Bell in town? Perhaps they’ll airlift 10,000 free tacos to you.

The Braiser: Food has transformed into a trendy culture and now its influence is making its way over to fashion.

Art of Eating: Can’t describe why something’s delicious? The answer is umami.

Better Together: Tomatoes and Mozzarella

by in Recipes, July 5th, 2012


Peanut butter and jelly. Spaghetti and meatballs. Burgers and fries. Some things are just better together, including tomatoes and mozzarella. Whether you enjoy them atop pizza, with pasta, on a sandwich or in a salad, there’s no denying that ripe, juicy tomatoes and creamy, smooth mozzarella cheese complement each other perfectly. This summer, take advantage of in-season from-the-vine tomatoes and prepare them in a classic style: caprese.

Italian caprese salads are most traditionally eaten raw, with just a handful of uncooked ingredients: slices of sweet tomatoes and smooth mozzarella cheese, hand-torn basil, a drizzle of olive oil, salt and pepper. It’s a rustic dish but one that shines when you use the freshest ingredients. We’ve rounded up Food Network’s best five caprese salad-inspired recipes, each a unique twist on the classic dish. Check them out below, then tell us your favorite way to enjoy tomatoes and mozzarella.

5. The Neelys’ Caprese Tart – Gina and Pat arrange slices of tomatoes and mozzarella atop pesto-brushed puff pastry and bake it for just 15 minutes to create a fuss-free appetizer.

4. Baked Panzanella Caprese – Transform the seasonal panzanella salad into Giada’s warm, baked plate by layering slices of tomatoes and mozzarella, tangy balsamic and chopped garlic and topping with thick-cut bread.

Get the top three recipes

Herb of the Month: Thyme

by , July 5th, 2012

thyme
‘Tis the season to pick up fresh thyme. Packed with flavor and nutritious goodness, make this delicious herb part of your next meal.

Thyme Basics
This perennial herb is a member of the mint family and is native to southern Europe and the Medit...

Read more

Reuse Good Olive Oil

by in Food Network Magazine, July 4th, 2012

Caprese Salad with artichokes

Hot tips from Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

After pan-frying something in extra-virgin olive oil, drizzle the leftover oil from the skillet on salads or bread. The oil is especially tasty after you’ve fried peppers, onions or other flavorful vegetables, like the artichokes in Food Network Magazine‘s Caprese Salad With Prosciutto and Fried Artichokes (pictured above). Don’t use this trick with vegetable oil, though: It’s too bland for drizzling.

Reinvented: Corn on the Cob 5 Ways

by in Recipes, July 4th, 2012

corn on the cob 5 ways
Here in Food Network Kitchens, we love simple, classic recipes. We are also paid to think about food all day. So we’ve taken classic foods and drinks and reimagined them into three, four or five different ways. No standard recipes here, just the occasional technique and pictures. Think of it as a picture recipe.

We can’t get enough corn in the summer. Whether you try these recipes this Fourth of July or keep them in your back pocket for upcoming barbecues, we came up with these variations so you could eat corn every day and not get bored.

First, start with the classic version