Best 5 Valentine’s Day Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, February 11th, 2012


Nothing says love like a home-cooked meal, right? This Valentine’s Day, forget about making restaurant reservations and serve your someone special a romantic dinner or dessert for two at home. Food Network’s top five Valentine’s Day recipes are elegant yet traditional dishes that you can easily make with love.

5. Shrimp Scampi With Linguini — A quick-cooking seafood, shrimp dress up classic pasta with garlic, lemon and white wine.

4. Chocolate Covered Strawberries — These two-bite treats are covered in smooth semi-sweet chocolate.

Get the top three recipes »

Good Eats Finale Airs Tonight

by in Shows, February 10th, 2012

Alton Brown

After 14 seasons, hundreds of recipes and dozens of memorable characters (Lactose Man! The Yeasts!), Alton Brown is bidding farewell to Good Eats. The final episode, an homage to dark chocolate, airs tonight at 8pm/7c.

Fans of our beloved food-science geek need not panic — you’ll still see plenty of Alton on Food Network. He’s got a major new role on the upcoming season of Food Network Star, commentates on Iron Chef America and serves as host of The Next Iron Chef. Plus, classic Good Eats episodes will continue to rerun on Food Network and Cooking Channel.

To celebrate Alton’s many years of (exceptionally) Good Eats, we’ve rounded up his 10 most popular recipes from the show. His top recipe, Good Eats Roast Turkey, is the #1 recipe on FoodNetwork.com with a whopping 3,905 five-star reviews and counting. It has graced thousands of your Thanksgiving tables since 1999, and we’re guessing many of you also made #8 or #9 (or both!) for last Sunday’s big game.

Alton’s 10 most popular recipes from the show »

Cooking Tips From Worst Cooks Coach Anne Burrell

by in Food Network Magazine, February 10th, 2012

Worst Cooks in America coach Anne Burrell has some tough-love advice for the truly helpless.

As the two-time host and champion cooking coach on Worst Cooks in America, Anne Burrell has seen her share of bad cooking. Not ordinary bad-dinner-party-at-the-neighbors’ bad cooking, but unfathomably bad, practically gag-inducing cooking. “I’ve seen food so burned, so over-spiced that it’s inedible,” Anne says. “My favorite was a guy who boiled a whole chicken and dumped some tomato sauce on it and called it chicken parmigiana.”

Anne is back for round three on February 12, when Worst Cooks in America returns, going head-to-head with co-host Bobby Flay in trying to whip the country’s most disastrous home cooks into shape. We asked the former culinary school teacher and restaurant chef what bad cooks can do to step up their game.

Read more

Short Rib Lasagna Rolls — The Weekender

by in Holidays, Recipes, February 10th, 2012

short rib lasagna rolls
When I was in college, I had a friend who insisted on wearing all black on Valentine’s Day. It was her way of protesting the hubbub and commercialization of the holiday. Though I could see her point, I didn’t follow suit. I remained utterly charmed by a day devoted to love.

However, as I’ve gotten older, I have become a little disgusted with how much money people think it takes to do Valentine’s Day right. If you believe the marketing, you need a second job to make your sweetie feel loved. Restaurants take particular advantage of our expectations and raise their prices for the day. A meal that would regularly cost $50 doubles to $100. Wine and cocktail prices ratchet up precipitously, as well.

Here’s my suggestion. Instead of blowing through wads of cash on a meal out, treat your honey to a special-occasion, home-cooked meal. You’ll spend a fraction of the cash you would on a fancy-pants dinner and with just a few carefully placed candles, you won’t lose even an ounce of the romance.

A recipe that works really well for a cozy dinner for two is Giada’s Short Rib Lasagna Rolls. It can be made over the weekend (this is The Weekender, after all) and stashed in the fridge for February 14. All you have to do when you get home from work is pop it into the oven, make a salad and pour glasses of something bubbly.

Before you start braising, read these tips »

On the Blogs: A Day in the Life of Bob Tuschman, Goat’s Meat and the New Foodspotting

by in View All Posts, February 9th, 2012

bob tuschman

  • The Huffington Post: Being a Star judge and a Food Network executive is not as glamorous as you might think.
  • Tasting Table:  Don’t forget dessert. Presenting 2012′s best pastry chefs from across the country and their breathtaking sugar creations.
  • ABC News: Walmart’s decision to simplify healthy choices for consumers with “Great for You” labels has nutritionists skeptical.
  • Wall Street Journal: You like goat cheese, but how about goat meat? Find out if you’ll like it and why it’s becoming more popular among chefs.
  • PCWorld: The popular food app Foodspotting gets a revamp and becomes something more useful for your taste buds.

Five-Spice Powder — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, February 9th, 2012

roast beef tenderloin
It’s all about harmony and yin-yang.

Which sounds tritely New Age-y, but really is the key to Chinese cuisine.

Because as with so much of Asian cooking, the blend of seasonings known as five-spice powder is intended to trigger a sense of balance in the mouth and nose.

How? A careful selection of spices that simultaneously hit notes of warm and cool, sweet and bitter, savory and searing.

Because that’s what you get with five-spice powder, a mix of fennel seeds, cinnamon, cloves, star anise and Sichuan peppercorns.

Like spice blends around the world, the proportions of those ingredients vary by region in China, but some variant of it is used throughout the country.

Read more