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Chatting With the Latest Next Iron Chef: Super Chef Exile

by in Shows, November 21st, 2011

beau and geoffrey
The fourth season of The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs is in full swing, with 10 new chefs fighting it out for a grand prize that so many would-be chefs covet: joining the ranks of Iron Chefs Marc Forgione, Bobby Flay, Masaharu Morimoto, Cat Cora, Jose Garces and Michael Symon. Each chef will try to pull out all their tricks to stay in the competition but, ultimately, one chef must go home each week. Every Monday, FN Dish brings you exclusive exit interviews with the latest Super Chef to get the boot.

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Watch Thanksgiving Live! This Sunday

by in Holidays, November 18th, 2011

thanksgiving live
For the first time ever, Food Network is going Live! Just in time for the feast, on Sunday at 12 pm/EST, Rachael, Bobby, Anne, Alex, Ted, Melissa, Sunny and your host, turkey master Alton Brown, will be on hand to answer your Thanksgiving questions live on-air. What do you want to know? Ask your question here.

The best Thanksgiving appetizer: Watch the Thanksgiving Live pre-show on Livestream or FoodNetwork.com at 11:30 am/EST Sunday. We’ll have exclusive interviews with Food Network chefs as they head into the kitchen to answer your questions.

The best Thanksgiving appetizer: Watch the Thanksgiving Live pre-show here at 11:30 am/EST Sunday. We’ll have exclusive interviews with Food Network chefs as they head into the kitchen to answer your questions.

 

Wines for a Special Occasion — Outsmarting Wine

by in Drinks, November 18th, 2011

special occasion wine
With the holidays looming, the wine mind naturally turns to occasions where we can break out the special stuff. Here are four of my favorite options:

Older Champagne: While most sparklers are meant to be drunk soon after release — when bubbles are vigorous and the taste shades to the citric and snappy — a good wine merchant can steer you to a bottle of mature Champagne (i.e., 10 years or more of bottle age). Its delicate bubbles and haunting, hazelnut flavors will make your important occasions seem that much more memorable.

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The Next Iron Chef Caption It: Funny Business

by in Shows, November 18th, 2011
Your Caption Here

In this week’s episode of The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs, the seven remaining rival chefs head to a comedy club to cook up some humor in the form of all-star dishes that are made with a heaping helping of improvisation.

In this sneak-peek shot, Saturday Night Live comedian Kevin Nealon stops by to help host and chef Alton Brown choose the ingredients the competitors must incorporate into their dishes. Will Kevin and Alton go easy on the chefs, giving them common ingredients, or will they select the oddest of the bunch?

Before you tune in this Sunday at 9pm/8c to watch these guys in action, we’re challenging you, Next Iron Chef fans, to write your best captions (tastefully appropriate, please) for this moment in the comments below.

Who’s your favorite rival chef so far? Cast your Fan Vote up to 10 times per day.

 

Gingerbread Waffles — The Weekender

by in Recipes, November 18th, 2011

gingerbread waffle recipe
I grew up in a waffle-loving household. At least one Saturday morning a month, my sister and I would convince our dad to stir up a batch of batter and pull out his curvy, chrome waffle iron (circa 1955).

He’d serve up the waffles as they came off the machine and it was up to us to add the butter and maple syrup (though my mother would watch our syrup application carefully to avoid over consumption). Often, my dad would make a double batch so that there’d be waffles for the freezer and weekday morning breakfasts.

These days, I make waffles on the same loose, monthly schedule that I know from growing up, always making some to eat and a few for the freezer. I used to be devoted to a vintage waffle iron that was much like the one I grew up with, but then, four years ago, someone gave me a modern one. It has nonstick plates and a timer that chimes gently when your waffle is finished cooking. It is heaven.

Before you fire up the waffle iron, read these tips »

Stuffing vs. Dressing, Plus 4 Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 18th, 2011

Oyster DressingIn many homes, the words “stuffing” and “dressing” are used interchangeably to reference that steamy mixture of bread, veggies and herbs that takes second seat next to the turkey at your Thanksgiving table. Though for some, the loyalty to either stuffing or dressing over the other runs deep. But is there really a difference between stuffing and dressing? Which elements of the dishes dictate their classification as one and not the other? How should you cook the stuffing or dressing to ensure that it’s served piping hot and moist and has a subtle, crisp top? We have the answers, plus four foolproof recipes that will steal the side dish show at your Thanksgiving dinner.

Simply Stuffed: As its name suggests, stuffing is traditionally stuffed into the cavity of the turkey and roasted inside of it. Though this cooking method allows the bread to absorb all of those tasty turkey juices, it also poses a slight sanitation risk because of the raw bird. If you’re set on serving a traditional stuffing inside the turkey, the bread and the turkey thighs must be cooked to a minimum temperature of 165 degrees F.

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Best 5 Thanksgiving Desserts

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 17th, 2011

pumpkin cheesecake
After multiple helpings of savory stuffing, juicy turkey and veggie casseroles, a sugary plate is practically necessary. This Thanksgiving, look no further than our top five Thanksgiving desserts for classic recipes to serve as the perfect ending to your meal.

5. Pecan Pie — A welcomed combination of creamy and crunchy textures, this pie is baked on a rich butter crust and filled with a brown sugar-egg mixture dotted with toasted pecans.

4. Traditional Apple Pie — Cinnamon-laced apples are baked in a flaky shortening-based crust to create a timeless dessert that is ready in just over an hour.

Get the top three recipes »

Lemon Grass — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, November 17th, 2011

lemon grass chicken stir fry
It may look and sound like a weed, but lemon grass actually is one of the most important ingredients in Southeast Asian cooking. And it can transform the all-American foods you love.

Lemon grass is a reed-like plant that grows as a thin, firm 2-foot stalk with a small bulb at the base. It varies in color from pale yellow to very light green.

True to name, lemon grass has a pleasantly assertive lemon taste and aroma.

Lemon Grass Chicken Stir-Fry »

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What’s in The Next Iron Chef Kitchen?

by in Shows, November 17th, 2011

chef falkner at the pantry
Behind the scenes on the Next Iron Chef, Food Network’s culinary production team is responsible for making sure that the rival chefs have everything they need to cook and present their dishes, from a stocked pantry to plenty of serving vessels. The Concession Challenge was the first that took place on set at the Next Iron Chef kitchen, so we asked the culinary team for an insider’s look at what was at the chefs’ disposal there.

How many pots and pans are on set for the competing chefs to cook with?
180. There were also 110 mixing bowls.

How many plates, bowls, glasses and accessories were provided for plating?
1,072

The amount of candy purchased for the Concession Challenge »

Making the Thanksgiving List and Checking It Twice (1 Week Away)

by in Holidays, November 17th, 2011

woman grocery shopping
After some serious editing and input from the diners, you’ve finally narrowed down the big menu and you’re ready to spring into action. Yes, it’s still too early to start roasting the turkey, but one week out is the perfect opportunity to stock up on the non-perishables you can safely shop for ahead of time — and forget about until Thanksgiving morning. The less last-minute scrambles to the supermarket the day of, the better.

• Cross-check: Now that you’ve been dreaming up recipes all week, it’s time to take inventory of your pantry and write up a master shopping list. Plan out what you can buy ahead (potatoes, onions, garlic, salt), what you can’t (fresh fruits and vegetables) and exactly when you’re planning on making each dish (and who’s going to make them).

Replenish your staples and buy wine »