Take a Seasoning Shortcut

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, October 8th, 2012

spice grinder
Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

You don’t need your measuring spoons every time a recipe calls for a specific amount of salt or pepper. Just count how many turns of your pepper mill make ¼ or ½ teaspoon and use that as your guide whenever you’re cooking. Do the same for salt: Count how many of your own pinches add up to each measurement. None of this has to be exact — you can always season to taste at the end.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

Three-Cheese Macaroni — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, October 7th, 2012

three cheese macaroni
You’d never know this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week was actually a lightened-up version of a comfort food classic. Food Network Kitchens used Muenster, sharp cheddar and Parmesan and mixed in pureed cauliflower for extra creaminess in Food Network Magazine‘s Three-Cheese Macaroni.

For more lightened-up recipe inspiration, visit Food Network’s Let’s Get Healthy board on Pinterest.

Get the recipe: Three-Cheese Macaroni

Chicken Nuggets: Are They Healthy?

by , October 7th, 2012

chicken nuggets
This kid-friendly and wildly popular food is often DEMANDED by kids.  Should you give into to your kiddos’ requests for these bite-sized poultry pieces?

YES?
At a first glance, breaded and fried chicken isn’t the best nor is it the worst fo...

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A Trivet Is No Trivial Matter

by in Entertaining, Holidays, October 6th, 2012

felt trivets
Even the most delicious cuisine is enhanced by presentation. Think of it as a backdrop, a stage set that brings your feast to life. What I bring to the party is everything but the food itself. I’ve always been fascinated by how food is presented on tables and settings of all types. In this new weekly column, I’ll be sharing my favorite design snippets and scenarios, based on my adventures as a Food Network designer and an avid connoisseur of style and design. So feel free to indulge here, but with your eyes only.

Think of these as essential presentation elements. The collectible trivet, from the most basic to the highly embellished, protects your counter and table surfaces from heat damage.

Keep reading

Waffles for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

by in Recipes, October 5th, 2012

pumpkin waffles
Think beyond the typical breakfast waffle and try to incorporate sweet and savory flavors to take waffles beyond breakfast and into lunch and dinner. We’ve rounded up Food Network’s top five waffle recipes, each light, crispy and a cinch to prepare.

5. Pumpkin Waffles With Maple Walnut Apples – For a true taste of fall, top homemade pumpkin waffles with a warm, maple-apple-walnut topping.

4. Gingerbread Waffles – Craving the classic gingerbread aromatic scent that often accompanies with the holidays? Rachael’s easy recipe will have these waffles on the table in less than 30 minutes.

Get the top three waffle recipes

What to Watch This Weekend: Home Made in America with Sunny Anderson and Halloween Wars

by in Shows, October 5th, 2012

home made in america with sunny anderson
Beginning this Saturday, October 6, you can watch Sunny Anderson embark upon a new journey in her second show, Home Made in America with Sunny Anderson. Follow Sunny as she travels through Baton Rouge, La., Oklahoma, North Carolina, Texas and New York tasting delicious home-cooked creations as she moves across the country. Sunny demonstrates that there is more to food besides preparation and flavor — there is also a story. Throughout the season Sunny will not only try the most-celebrated recipes in the cities she visits, but she will also meet the cooks behind the creations. These cooks will share their inspirational stories and also their own secrets and tips. Tune in to this daytime series at 9:30am ET/PT on October 6 so that you can be a part of the journey.

Get the recipes from the most recent episode of Home Made in America.

Keep reading about Halloween Wars

Spice of the Month: Cumin

by , October 5th, 2012

cumin
Cumin is earthy, smoky and downright toasty. This sensational spice is a must-have for fall cooking.

Cumin Basics
Dating back to the Old Testament, this ancient spice is a relative of parsley (but you’d never know it by the flavor). Tiny slivered ...

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Cast-Iron Skillet Focaccia — The Weekender

by in Recipes, October 5th, 2012

cast iron skillet focaccia
I bought my first cast-iron skillet in my early twenties. I didn’t have much of a budget for cookware in those days and all the advice I read said that cast iron was the best bang for my buck. All I really knew is that I didn’t want to deal with flimsy, peeling, nonstick pans anymore.

I was initially a little nervous about introducing cast iron into my kitchen, because I’d grown up with a mother who hated cast iron with a passion. She thought it was too heavy, fussy to care for and entirely unsanitary (because you’re not supposed to scrub it with soap. My mother is a firm believer in the power of a good, sudsy scour).

When my parents got married, she actually got rid of my dad’s beloved collection of cast-iron skillets. Forty-two years later, those long-gone skillets continue to be one of the few bones of contention in their marriage.

With this history, it’s understandable that I was uneasy about my own cast-iron purchase. Turns out my anxiety was entirely unwarranted. I fell hard for that first skillet, so much so that I added several others to my kitchen in short order. If my husband tossed out my skillets, I do believe it would be grounds for divorce.

Before you heat your skillet, read these tips