Barbie Babes — Truck-a-Day

by in Shows, August 11th, 2012


We’re just days away from the start of the third season of The Great Food Truck Race, and to give you a sneak peek at this year’s cast of rookie truckers, we’re introducing one team per day until the season premiere on Sunday, August 19, at 10pm/9c. Check back on FN Dish every day until the first episode to get an insider’s look at each of the teams competing for the keys to their dream food truck.

Hailing all the way from the Land Down Under, Barbie Babes is made up of Jasmin De Main, Hayley Chapman and Skye Boucaut, native Aussies with a passion for the food of their home country. Now living in Los Angeles, the ladies run a catering company that celebrates authentic Australian barbecue — like grilled snags, sausages and burgers — and features ingredients indigenous to that area. During the race, you’ll be able to spot the Barbie Babes by their can’t-miss safari hats and kangaroo-adorned t-shirts.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the Barbie Babes food truck.

Pitcher-Friendly Drinks — Weekend Cookout

by in Drinks, August 11th, 2012

taspberry picante paloma pitchers
This summer, Food Network’s Grilling Central is packed with recipes for the entire family’s taste buds, boasting the best in burgers, dogs, chicken and more all season long. But with so many recipes, where do you start? Each Saturday, FN Dish is giving you a complete menu that is stress-free, and this weekend’s menu is topped off with ice-cold pitchers of your favorite summertime drinks.

Whether hosting a large-scale holiday gathering, a backyard bash with friends or a casual cookout for family, the last thing you want to do is get stuck in the kitchen cooking while your guests are mingling and enjoying the party elsewhere. The same holds true for mixing drinks — who wants to play bartender all night when you could join in the celebration and raise a glass with your company? Avoid the need to take individual drink orders by mixing up big-batch recipes of crowd-pleasing pitchers to which your guests can simply help themselves.

Pictured above is Guy’s Raspberry Picante Paloma Pitcher from Food Network Magazine, which features a secret, slightly spicy ingredient: jalapeño pepper. To prepare, he muddles the pepper with sweet raspberries, tops the concoction with tequila and grapefruit juice and finishes it with a squeeze of lime. Guy takes his drink one step further by rimming each glass with grapefruit salt, made with a simple pairing of kosher salt and grapefruit zest. This recipe yields an impressive two quarts of cocktails, enough to serve up to six people and keep your party going well into the night.

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3 Days to Open: Big Guys Sausage Stand

by in Shows, August 10th, 2012

Big Guys Sausage

In suburban Chicago, Brendan O’Connor and three of his best friends desperately needed Bobby Flay’s help to make their restaurant dreams come true at Big Guys Sausage Stand. With just three days until the grand opening, Bobby tackled clashing personalities, unimaginative toppings and a depressing interior to help the guys create a sausage spot that impressed even the toughest of critics: Chicago’s Sandwich King, Jeff Mauro.

But what happened when Bobby headed home, leaving the guys to fend for themselves? We checked in with Brendan to see how Big Guys is doing a few months after Bobby’s intervention.

Brendan is happy to report that Big Guys is off to a great start: They are averaging $1,500 per day in sales and their numbers are growing daily thanks to neighborhood buzz, good local press and many repeat customers.

Keep reading

Keeping Blueberries From Sinking in Batter — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, August 10th, 2012

blueberry buckle
Twice a month, we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: “How can I get my fresh blueberries to distribute evenly in my cake better so when they bake, they all don’t sink or rise, leaving nothing in the middle?” — Suzanne Sinatra Perucci via Facebook

Answer: Try tossing your berries with a tablespoon or two of flour before adding them to the batter. Just remember to account for that when you mix up your dry ingredients, subtracting that same tablespoon or two from the amount called for in the recipe. The light coating of flour around the berries will absorb some of the fruit’s liquid, making them less likely to sink. This is especially helpful when the batter is thin; thicker batters are a little better at cradling the fruit and keeping it suspended. You can try this with any of your add-ins — peach chunks, strawberries, chocolate chips, dried fruits or nuts — when the batter is thin. Even if it ends up not being necessary, it certainly won’t hurt the recipe.

More From Fix My Dish

Salt and Pepper Spare Ribs With Romesco Sauce — The Weekender

by in Recipes, August 10th, 2012

salt and pepper spare ribs
For the last 10 years, I’ve lived in the same apartment in Center City Philadelphia. It’s a wonderful, light-filled space that has been in my family since 1965. I am well and truly lucky to call it home. The apartment really has only one downside and that’s the total absence of outdoor space. During the winter months, it’s no big thing, but come summer, I long to have a bit of space in which to grow a few vegetables and set up a grill.

I’ve not found an adequate substitute for indoor gardening yet, but when it comes to giving food a grill-like flavor and appearance, I’ve developed a few tricks. I have a stovetop grill pan and a fancy George Foreman-like appliance that does a very nice job with pork chops. When it’s about more than the simple appearance of grill marks, I use either smoked paprika, liquid smoke or hickory-smoked sea salt. Each has a way of lending a touch of open fire to the foods they’ve been added to.

Recently, my husband announced that he was longing for ribs, preferably the kind that tasted like they’d spent hours in contact with indirect, smoky heat. Before we made tracks for our local barbecue joint, I decided to see if I couldn’t find a way to mimic that kind of flavor at home.

Before you heat your oven, read these tips

Coconut Diet 101

by in Uncategorized, August 10th, 2012

coconut
This popular diet has a die-hard following. We’ll tell you if coconut oil is the ultimate superfood that’ll help you shed pounds or just another fad diet making waves.

Overview
The theory behind this diet is that when coconut oil is combined wit...

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On the Blogs: Astronaut Hot Dogs, Plus McDonald’s Midnight Breakfast

by in News, August 10th, 2012

hot dogEater: Watch a hot dog journey into outer space and drop back down to earth, only to be eaten immediately.

Food 52: What is a cherpumple? It’s an outrageous dessert composed of three cakes, each filled and baked with its own pie.

Food Beast: “Floating mugs” may be your family’s solution to those unwanted condensation rings left behind on table.

Business Insider: You don’t have to wait until morning anymore to grab an Egg McMuffin. McDonald’s introduces Breakfast After Midnight.

Tupperware Smart Prep System Giveaway

by in Contests, August 9th, 2012

tupperware smart prep system
Make the most of your grill in these remaining summer weeks with the Smart Prep Marinating System. The liquid-tight, lockable container takes the mess out of marinating and breading while still infusing your dish with loads of flavor in seconds. Its compact size is also perfect for taking food on the go.

You can buy your own Smart Prep System, or enter in the comment field below for a chance to win one. To enter: Tell us your favorite kind of marinade in the comments. We’re giving away a Smart Prep System to three lucky, randomly selected commenters.

Read official rules before entering

Try a T-Bone Pork Chop

by in Food Network Magazine, August 9th, 2012

T-Bone Pork Chop

The T-bone pork chop is the perfect cut for grilling. Also called the “center cut” or “pork loin chop,” it’s immediately recognizable by the T-shaped bone running through it — much like the beefsteak of the same name. It’s mostly juicy loin meat, with a little bit of lean but tender tenderloin meat, and a nice amount of fat to impart lots of moisture and flavor. But the most important component is the bone itself, which does a lot to keep the chop from drying out as it cooks.

When you brine these chops, you end up with an even juicier cut. The chops in Food Network Magazine’s Grilled Pork Chops With Plum Ginger Chutney (pictured above) are brined in a mixture of water, sugar, salt, gin, vermouth and various spices. The botanical flavors of the booze really complement both the pork and the plum chutney. For your next barbecue, leave the boneless cuts at the store and try the T-bone instead. We promise you’ll be licking your chops.

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