Best 5 Vegetable Soup Recipes

by in Recipes, January 17th, 2013

Ravioli and Vegetable Soup
Whether you’re fighting a winter cold, trying to escape the chill of January air or simply craving winter comfort food, look to hearty bowls of vegetable soup to warm you up in a flash. Check out Food Network’s top five vegetable soup recipes below for no-fail hearty suppers, complete with satisfying seasonal produce. Then tell us in the comments: What’s your favorite warming meal?

5. Ravioli and Vegetable Soup — Best finished with nutty Parmesan cheese, Food Network Magazine‘s quick-cooking soup gets its heft from store-bought cheese ravioli and escarole, a nutrient-rich green.

4. Provencal Vegetable Soup — Ina simmers potatoes, carrots and haricots verts until the vegetables are tender, then mixes in one final key element before serving: pistou, a traditional French mixture of garlic, tomato paste, basil, olive oil and Parmesan cheese.
Get the top three recipes

Sweet Genius Bloopers From Season 3

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, January 17th, 2013


Ron Ben-Israel may have it all together in the sweets department, but he doesn’t always have his act together on the set of Sweet Genius. Don’t miss these hilarious bloopers from Season 3 (click the play button above).

Don’t forget to tune in Thursdays at 10pm/9c to catch Ron in an all-new season of Sweet Genius. Each episode, master pastry chef Ron will challenge four chefs to create scrumptious sweets with surprise ingredients to see who will win the $10,000 prize.

Keep watching: More Sweet Genius Bloopers From Season 3

Bobby Flay Fit, Episode 4: Discipline

by , January 17th, 2013

Bobby Flay Fit Bobby Flay manages to stay fit and healthy even with a busy lifestyle as a chef, and he’s eager to share his healthy eating and fitness plan with fans in a seven-part Web series, Bobby Flay Fit.

The focus of Episode 4 of Bobby Flay Fit is discipline: Discipline applies not just to exercise, but to cooking and eating as well. Self-control is an important part of discipline, but it’s also important to choose lean ingredients, add bold flavors without extra fat and use healthy cooking techniques.

In Episode 4, Bobby cooks a new recipe in his Manhattan restaurant, Bar Americain: grouper steamed in parchment paper and topped with martini relish. Steaming fish in paper is an easy, healthy cooking technique that doesn’t rely on fats from ingredients like butter or cream. Bobby likes bold flavors in every bite of his food so he adds a drizzle of sour orange sauce to his fish, plus a spoonful of relish made with olives and hot peppers.

Read more

Restaurant Revisited: Windseeker Restaurant

by in Shows, January 16th, 2013

Robert Irvine on Food Network's Restaurant: ImpossibleFor Windseeker Restaurant in The Dalles, Ore., the problems went beyond a tired dining room and lackluster food. They had been battling negative press for years, and owner Veta Bingman and general manager Patty Taylor faced a constant struggle to attract customers to their out-of-the-way location, despite the breathtaking river views that surround them. In just two days and with a $10,000 budget, Robert Irvine and his Restaurant: Impossible team transformed the eatery into a sophisticated space complete with a high-quality menu that would improve Windseeker’s local reputation. We checked in with Patty a few months after Robert left to find out how the restaurant is doing today.

Comparing year-over-year numbers, Patty says that “Business is up by $30,000″ following the renovation, and she adds that the cost of food and wages has increased as well. Since their Restaurant: Impossible experience, the staff has not borrowed money from the restaurant.

Keep reading

Devils on Horseback, Cookie Dough Pasta and Tostones — Rebel Remix

by in Shows, January 16th, 2013

Chopped Champions Round 1
Every Wednesday, Justin Warner, winner of Food Network Star Season 8, is remixing the Chopped Champion baskets as seen in the episode the night before in pure Justin Warner-style: edgy, intense, passionate and full of witty. If you’ve ever watched an episode and found yourself yelling at the TV, “I would have made this and that instead!” then these are the posts for you.

by Justin Warner

I play the Chopped game differently from most. My goal is not to transform things but to find the simplest way to make them work together. I’m not a magician or a craftsman — I’m more like a negotiator or ombudsman. I also try to think of the ingredients as something other than what they are. Yes, they might be duck tongues, but it’s easier to play with them if you think of them as chicken tenders. Make sense? With all of that said, here’s what I would do with the baskets from last night’s episode.

Justin breaks down the Chopped basket

The Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookie — Comfort Food Feast

by in Family, Recipes, January 16th, 2013

Chocolate Chip CookiesWe all get a bit territorial over our chocolate chip cookies. Some like them so crispy a discernible crunch ensues. Others like them so soft that it’s unclear whether they ever reached the oven. In the end, however, there’s no argument over this cookie’s ability to bring us back — especially when a glass of milk is involved. Preheat those ovens. It’s time for some cookies.

The recipe for classic Chocolate Chip Cookies, in reality, needs no fiddling. It’s soft on the inside and crispy on the outside. Just out of the oven, the chocolate chips are so gooey they stick to your fingers.

Still, Food Network Magazine has its own take on the many faces of the chocolate chip cookie, perfect for those a bit particular about consistency. Check out its recipes for Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies, Crispy Chocolate Chip Cookies and even Cakey Chocolate Chip Cookies.

Get more chocolate chip cookie recipes from family and friends

Hot Spots: Three Unique American Chilis

by in Food Network Magazine, View All Posts, January 16th, 2013

Texas Bowl of RedWarm up with three regional chilis and see why each has a cult following. The experts share their recipes with Food Network Magazine.

In Texas, chili is practically a religion, with one important tenet: Keep it simple. That means no beans and, often, no tomatoes — just beef and spices. “Texas red,” as the locals call it, gets its distinctive dark red color from a big shot of chili powder (a mix of spices that usually includes paprika, cumin and cayenne). Texans cook it low and slow, just like their barbecue, until the chili gets thick and the meat is super tender. Texas Chili Parlor in Austin serves one of the most well-known versions: The Austin American-Statesman called it “legendary,” and owner Scott Zublin says his customers put away up to 250 gallons every week. You can order it mild, hot or extra-hot; the recipe Zublin gave us makes a moderately spicy chili. To turn the heat up or down, just adjust the amount of chili powder. 1409 Lavaca St.; txchiliparlor.com

Try the recipe: Texas Bowl of Red (pictured above)

Read more