Now You Can Run a Bar Tab Without Handing Over Your Credit Card

by in News, March 8th, 2017

Now You Can Run a Bar Tab Without Handing Over Your Credit CardRaise your hand if this has ever happened to you: You’ve opened a tab at a bar and had a few drinks with friends, only to realize, after you’ve responsibly made your way home, that, in your post-cocktail haze, you’ve left your credit card or ID with the bartender and have to find your way back to the bar to claim it. Bummer. Or, how about this: At the end of the night, you’re looking to settle up your tab with the bartender, but the bar is so packed with other revelers that you can barely get near it, let alone catch the bartender’s eye. (I, personally, seem to don some sort of cloak of invisibility every time I get near a bar. What is that about?)

Mastercard has just come up with something to solve both of those problems. “Open Tab,” a new feature on the company’s mobile order and payment platform, Qkr! With Masterpass, lets you to open a tab at a bar, club or restaurant without having to hand over your credit card or ID. (Qkr! With Masterpass, in use in several countries around the world, is expanding to the United States this year.)

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6 Shrimp Dinners That Are Ready in a Hurry

by in Recipes, March 8th, 2017

Lemon-Garlic Shrimp with GritsAny dinner that comes together in 30 minutes or less hits the sweet spot at my house, which makes quick-cooking shrimp a favorite for weeknight meals. Shrimp cooks so quickly, in fact, that the most-important advice I ever learned about preparing shrimp was simple: Don’t overcook it! For the best taste and texture, keep a watchful eye for those little beauties until they just turn pink. That mean’s dinner’s on!

Lemon Garlic Shrimp with Grits (pictured above)
This Southern favorite cooks up in just 30 minutes, and though it’s packed with the bold flavors of nutty Parmesan cheese, garlic and bright lemon, it’s a surprisingly healthy option.

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9 Things You Didn’t Know About Your Favorite Breakfast

by in News, March 7th, 2017

9 Things You Didn't Know About Your Favorite BreakfastIt’s National Cereal Day! And to help you celebrate, we’re going to dish on some totally cool facts about your breakfast food of choice.

Cereal is one of those foods you just can’t help but associate with the good old U.S. of A. Invented in the United States in 1863 by James Caleb Jackson, according to reporting by The New York Times, and then popularized by the Kellogg brothers and beloved at our breakfast tables ever since, cereal is still a staple in most American homes.

But how much do you really know about it? Below, check out nine fun facts.

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Gwyneth Paltrow’s Organic Cafe Will Have a Room Dedicated to Selfies

by in News, March 6th, 2017

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Organic Cafe Will Have a Room Dedicated to SelfiesGwyneth Paltrow is expanding her empire and making it easier for the world to follow her food lead. The actress-turned-food-writer and healthy-lifestyle advocate is opening an organic cafe in New York, the next iteration in an endeavor that began in 2015 as a summer-in-the-Hamptons pop-up health-food purveyor.

Set to open in March adjacent to Paltrow pal and celebrity fitness trainer Tracy Anderson’s new private fitness studio — where membership will run you $900 a month, not to mention the $1,500 initiation fee — the new eatery, 3 Green Hearts, will offer coffee, juices, smoothies and healthy prepared meals. (The third member of the green-heart trio is Tracy Anderson CEO Maria Baum.)

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Exclusive Interview with the Season 10 Winner of Worst Cooks in America

by in Shows, March 5th, 2017

Ann, Rachael, Anne and Daniel at the finale.It’s hard to believe that 10 weeks ago, 16 terrible cooks entered Worst Cooks Boot Camp, and now the two recruits who’ve excelled the most made it all the way to the finale to cook it out for $25,000. The Red Team’s Daniel and the Blue Team’s Ann came into the competition clueless about techniques and lacked any skill necessary to remotely pull off an edible meal. Remember Daniel’s frugal frittata that he overdosed on garlic powder and saffron, or Ann’s less-than desirable chicken breast with rice and tomato sauce? It’s better to forget!

In this last cooking challenge, the two recruits had the opportunity to show off all that they’ve learned for a panel of three culinary experts. The judges tasted both Ann’s and Daniel’s three courses before picking a winner, the one cook who served the best meal overall. Hear from the winning recruit and find out which mentor earned the glory and bragging rights.

Spoiler Alert: Interview with the Season 10 Winner

Chefs’ Picks: Veggie Comfort Food

by in Restaurants, March 5th, 2017

Il Porcino Cauliflower Parm
Chefs’ Picks: Veggie Comfort Food
The phrase “comfort food” often conjures up visions of spaghetti and meatballs, fried chicken and other meat-centric mains that people seek out as a source of both sustenance and solace. But with more diners adopting vegetarian or vegan diets, chefs are finding new ways to prepare comfort food classics sans the meat. Pros across the country share their hearty plant-based creations capable of satisfying the stomach… and the soul. Read more

How Butter Was Born — and Why It Spread

by in News, March 5th, 2017

How Butter Was Born — and Why It SpreadNow that butter is back in our culture’s collective good graces, butter lovers (read: most of us, since butter consumption recently hit a 40-year high) may be ready to regard its past. That may be the thinking behind “Butter: A Rich History,” a new book whose author, food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova, has been making the rounds to dish about butter’s rise from its origins to its exalted place on our tables today.

The promotion of Khosrova’s book has provided those she has spoken with the opportunity to whip out their best butter puns. (“Spread” is a constant, but bonus points to Smithsonian magazine headline writers for shmearing it on thick with a double pun: New Book Clarifies Butter’s Spread …).

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POLL: How Do You Chill Out?

by in Polls, View All Posts, March 4th, 2017

Iced TeaWith the first day of spring only a few weeks away, Food Network Magazine editors have their taste buds focused on drinks piled high with cold ice cubes. And with so many opinions about exactly how to use ice in beverages, the editors want your thoughts. Do you dare put ice in a glass of red wine? How many cubes go into your morning iced coffee? You’ll find these questions and more in the poll, below. When you’re done, be sure to pick up a summer issue to see how your answers stack up against the rest of America. Read more

4 Ways to Hack Weeknight Cooking

by in Recipes, Shows, March 4th, 2017

Honey Chipotle Chicken Wet BurritoAt the end of a long day, it can feel daunting to walk into the kitchen and stare down a complex, multi-step recipe when all you want is some dinner. But, of course, despite the time crunch, you’re still craving a satisfying meal — and perhaps a sweet treat too. The good news: You can, in fact, enjoy all the food you want while retaining your weeknight sanity. The secret is to take a few welcome shortcuts, both in terms of store-bought ingredients and tools that make the process of prep work speedy and simple. On this morning’s all-new episode of The Kitchen, the cast showcased an entire menu of weeknight-friendly recipes, and with those how-tos came helpful kitchen hacks. Read on below for all the details.

1. Save time with store-bought ingredients.

Sunny Anderson’s Honey Chipotle Chicken Wet Burrito (pictured above) can be on the table in a hurry, thanks in large part to a ready-to-go rotisserie chicken. By starting with already cooked meat — chicken that’s juicy and tender straight off the bone — she cuts her prep time significantly, though she doesn’t sacrifice taste or texture. Similarly, a can of honey-chipotle beans goes a long way in boosting the flavor of the hearty filling, while a flavor base of adobo sauce, barbecue seasoning and fresh scallions adds homemade comfort.

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Why a Waldorf Salad Is Called a Waldorf Salad

by in News, March 4th, 2017

Why a Waldorf Salad Is Called a Waldorf SaladThe Waldorf salad, with its sweetness and its crunch, is a classic for a reason. There’s a lot to love about its blend of apples, celery, walnuts and lettuce, with just the right amount of mayo and lemon, maybe some grapes. For most of us, the Waldorf seems like a salad staple, something that’s always been there. But, on the occasion of this week’s closing (temporarily, for renovations) of its namesake New York City hotel, the Waldorf Astoria, the New York Times has recalled the salad’s origins.

Here is the lowdown on how one of America’s favorite salads came to be — and why a Waldorf salad is called a Waldorf salad:

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