A Win for Sale — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, August 25th, 2013

On last week’s After-Show, judge Simon Majumdar said: “Being a great chef is one thing. Being a strategic chef is another. If you can combine those, you can actually end up winning Cutthroat Kitchen without being technically the best chef.” And tonight Alton may have proved that theory to be true when he told Simon the lengths to which one competitor went to claim the win.

The name of the game in Cutthroat Kitchen is indeed sabotage, but with that comes personal advantages for the competitor dealing those devastating blows to his or her rivals. With every big-ticket disruption one chef purchases and assigns to another contestant, he’s essentially buying himself safety from that challenge. Alton told Simon that, in this week’s final auction, one chef — who would ultimately go on to win the battle — spent almost all of his or her money ensuring his or her own smooth finish by assigning someone else the challenge of making crab cakes without a binder, like mayonnaise. This person “bought victory,” Simon said of the outcome, chalking up this reality to the fact that “anything is possible in Cutthroat Kitchen.”

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Interview with the Latest Food Truck Team Out of the Race

by in Shows, August 25th, 2013

Food Truck Race teamsThe seven remaining teams had a wet start in Portland on Episode 2 of The Great Food Truck Race. With little foot traffic, sales were slow, and each team was stuck with its chosen location because of Portland’s street vendor regulations. Boardwalk Breakfast Empire and Tikka Tikka Taco chose to set up residence at local food cart pods, whereas the other teams partnered with local business, but neither location was more advantageous than the other. Besides that, a set of surprises from Tyler made for an even more challenging weekend. But one team that was headed for success suddenly took a turn for the worse.

SPOILER ALERT: Find Out Which Team Was Eliminated

Restaurant Revisited: A Pie in the Sky at Aponte’s Pizzeria

by in Shows, August 25th, 2013

Robert Irvine on Restaurant: ImpossibleFacing nearly a quarter of a million dollars in debt, Tony Aponte looked to Robert Irvine and the Restaurant: Impossible team to give his Mason, Ohio, business, Aponte’s Pizzeria, a second chance at success. Tony had been working in pizzerias since he was 11 years old and purchased Aponte’s just eight years ago. But during that time, he hadn’t made a single change to the menu. “I grew up on it, and I stick by it,” Tony said of his food. Ultimately, it was this menu that Robert deemed to be the root of Aponte’s downfall. “There’s just no taste to anything,” Robert said simply, noting that the dingy decor and difficult-to-navigate entrance didn’t improve the overall dining experience. With only two days and a $10,000 budget, Robert got to work on breaking down the self-described “bull-headed” Tony and transforming Aponte’s into a thriving pizzeria once again. FN Dish caught up with Tony a few months after his business reopened to find out how it’s doing today.

After a rocky start, Tony is adjusting to the changes at Aponte’s. Robert’s improvements have boosted the restaurant’s bottom line, with a 60 percent increase in sales at the end of June.

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Star Kitchen: Jessica Seinfeld

by in Food Network Magazine, August 24th, 2013

Jessica Seinfield's Kitchen

Check out Jessica Seinfeld’s guesthouse kitchen, then pick up some of her finds for your own kitchen.

gallon montana jar Jessica keeps big containers like these 2 1/2-gallon Montana jars stocked with bagels, chips and oranges for her guests. $35; anchorhocking.com

 

 

 

plate shelf Hang a plate shelf like Jessica’s: It shows off her pieces, plus guests know just where to put everything. $70; ikea.com

 

 

 

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21 Smarter Summer Desserts

by , August 24th, 2013

peaches and cream
What’s summer without fabulous desserts? All of these delicious treats have 400 calories or under per serving.

Fruit-Based
Stock up on mouthwatering summer fruits before the season is gone! They supply plenty of good-for-you antioxidants in ad...

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Ice Cream Sandwiches Your Way — Weekend Cookout

by in Recipes, August 24th, 2013

Super Cool: Ice Cream Sandwiches

Wrapped in paper and featuring the deliciously classic combination of a chocolate cookie exterior and cool vanilla center, store-bought ice cream sandwiches are a timeless summer treat. But there are indeed more ways to celebrate ice cream sandwiches than the original, especially when you think way beyond those chocolate and vanilla bars and commit to making your own signature creations at home.

Cherry-Almond CroissantsThe key to making successful ice cream sandwiches is combining flavors that you know work well together, like peanut butter and jelly or chocolate and bananas. Start with your favorite ice cream flavor — no need to make it from scratch, as any grocery store brand will do. Then look to complement it with two shells; cookies are a traditional pick, but other treats like doughnuts, crackers and sweet breads transform the sandwich into something extra special.

Food Network Magazine created a collection of frozen concoctions — Super Cool: Ice Cream Sandwiches — that features inventive sandwich-inspired twists, like Cherry-Almond Croissants (pictured right), Coffee and Doughnuts and Chocolate-Banana Bread. Check out these photos to learn how to craft these desserts and more at home. No matter what ingredients you choose to use, Food Network Magazine notes that it’s important to “freeze your base before assembling” and to “freeze sandwiches at least 1 hour before serving.” This will give the ice cream a chance to solidify, so that it doesn’t turn into a melted mess when you eat it.

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Ratatouille with Poached Eggs and Garlic Croutons — The Weekender

by in In Season, August 23rd, 2013

Ratatouille with Poached Eggs and GarlicEvery August, I spend a few weeks going a little bit crazy for ratatouille. There is something magical that happens when you combine eggplant, tomatoes, zucchini, onions, garlic and whatever herbs you happen to have around.

Part of the reason I’m so fond of this late-summer dish is that it’s one I grew up eating. My mom often made it when we were young with produce straight from the garden. Sometimes she served it chunky, but more often, she’d push it through a food mill and call it soup. It’s funny how much more willing we were to eat it when it was smooth and without any visible bits of veggie.

My Grandma Bunny was also a huge fan of ratatouille. She frequently made it in a large skillet, topped it with a layer of grated Parmesan cheese and popped it under the broiler until the cheese bubbled and browned. Served with chicken thighs marinated in lemon, garlic and olive oil, it was regular dinner for our extended family.

Before you start cooking, read these tips

Juicing: Myths vs. Facts

by , August 23rd, 2013

juice
The juicing craze is still going strong, but many folks are still doing it for all of the wrong reasons. If you love juicing, make sure you’ve got the facts.

Myth: Juicing helps you lose weight
Fact: Although fruits and vegetables are relative...

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