Know Your Conversions

by in Food Network Magazine, March 26th, 2013

measuring cup

Hot Tips for Cooking With Cheese From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

When a recipe calls for grated cheese, you might not always know how big a block you should buy. The texture of the cheese makes all the difference, but as a general rule, 3 to 4 ounces whole yields 1 cup grated. To measure grated cheese, put it in a dry measuring cup and tap it against the counter; don’t pack it firmly.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D)

How to Host a Large Party: Tips and Ideas From Restaurant Chefs

by in Events, How-to, March 26th, 2013

Sunday Supper at Chelsea MarketWhile you may have mastered the art of preparing dinner for your immediate family, have you learned the secrets to entertaining a crowd of partygoers at home? Shopping and cooking for, as well as serving, a meal at a big-bash party invites questions and challenges that you may not face when planning everyday eats and drinks: What are some go-to dishes that will please a diverse group of guests? How much food is needed to feed everyone? What’s the best way to serve multiple courses?

No one can answer these questions better than restaurant chefs, those who’ve made a career out of cooking for large groups of people and who know the ins and outs of preparing to host a crowd. Elizabeth Karmel, owner and executive chef of Hill Country, Elizabeth Falkner, owner and executive chef at Krescendo and a two-time competitor on The Next Iron Chef, and Hedy Goldsmith, executive pastry chef at Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink in Miami, Fla., showed off their exemplary party-throwing skills in New York City last weekend at the fifth annual Sunday Supper at Chelsea Market, supporting the James Beard Foundation‘s Scholarship for Fulton Youth of the Future and Wellness in the Schools. Together with more than a dozen of their chef colleagues, these ladies cooked a six-course feast for nearly 300 people that included such deliciously inspired bites as caponata with creamy burrata, pasta with sweet onions, tender jumbo prawns and pear crostata.

FN Dish was on hand not only to see the orchestra that’s needed to successfully pull off an event of that magnitude but also to find out from Chefs Karmel, Falkner and Goldsmith how home cooks can utilize similar tricks and techniques when entertaining on a smaller scale.

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Where the Locals Go, Comfort Food Classics and Funky Joints on Triple D Tonight

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, March 25th, 2013

Guy Fieri - Singaporean Food TruckIn tonight’s new episode of Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives (10pm/9c), Guy’s digging into dishes with a personal connection. In Toronto he’ll visit a Jewish deli smoking meats and knishes the old-school way. And in Los Angeles, he’ll hop aboard a funky food truck infusing Singaporean flavors into their chili crab cakes and lamb burgers.

But before Guy takes off, he’s heading out in a marathon of episodes that will suffice any carbohydrate craving your heart desires, with dishes like lasagna Bolognese, pasta carbonara, barbecue spaghetti, and lobster mac and cheese. Beyond pasta, get recipes for Baked Lemonade Pork Chops, Chicken and Dumplings and Sweet Potato Souffle.

Take the trip with him starting at 6:30pm/ 5:30c — follow along and bookmark the restaurants as he goes, then try your hand at the recipes.

Go behind the scenes with Guy Fieri

11 Things You Didn’t Know About Chuck Hughes — Chopped All-Stars

by in Shows, March 25th, 2013

Chuck HughesFN Dish is counting down to the Season 3 premiere of Chopped All-Stars by introducing a competitor every day. Sixteen competitors including Food Network and Cooking Channel talent, renowned chefs, Chopped judges and celebrities are competing for a chance to win the title of All-Stars Champion and a $50,000 donation to charity. Watch the premiere on Sunday, April 7, at 9pm/8c and keep coming back to FN Dish for exclusive interviews and behind-the-scenes previews.

Chuck Hughes is the host of Chuck’s Day Off, Chuck’s Week Off: Mexico and Chuck’s Eat the Street on Cooking Channel. He’s also appeared on Food Network’s The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs. Chuck is the chef/owner of Montreal hot spots Garde Manger and Le Bremner. When he’s not busy in the kitchen you can catch him on the ice playing hockey, but could you ever think of this tattooed chef as a ballet dancer? Find out more things you didn’t know about Chuck in his Q&A below.

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Mexican Frittata — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, March 25th, 2013

Mexican FrittataYou may be familiar with frittatas as a weekend brunch pick, but have you ever considered introducing them to your weeknight dinner repertoire? Every bit as hearty and satisfying as a main-dish pasta, salad or soup, frittatas are similar to omelets in that they’re egg-based, but while omelets are almost always made on the stovetop alone, frittatas are sauteed, then transferred to the oven to bake, which is why it’s especially important that you start the cooking process in an oven-proof skillet. Think of frittatas as you would most egg dishes: a blank canvas through which you can showcase any number of flavors or put to work leftover ingredients you happen to have on hand. Check out two of Food Network’s favorite frittata recipes below — one creative with bold Mexican-inspired flavors and the other a traditional Italian standby — both ready to enjoy in less than 30 minutes.

A top-rated recipe made with just a handful of flavors, Marcela’s Mexican Frittata (pictured above) is a 25-minute timesaver that features bright cilantro, fresh scallions and, for added indulgence, a topping of Mexican crema — a smooth dairy similar to sour cream — and Oaxaca cheese. After cooking the beaten eggs on the stove for a few minutes, she transfers the pan to the oven, where the eggs will bake, puff up slightly and become deliciously golden brown. Marcela notes that it’s fine to serve this recipe at room temperature, so no need to worry if you can’t sit down to dinner as soon as the frittata is baked.

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Reasons to Love Horseradish

by , March 25th, 2013


Once the gefilte fish hits the table during our Passover feast, about 20 of us start fighting for the horseradish to top it. But this spicy condiment goes far beyond the Passover table.

Horseradish 101
Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a member o...

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Chili-Spiked Edamame

by , March 25th, 2013

edamame
Edamame, or soybeans in the pod, shouldn’t be relegated to date night at your local Japanese joint. With just 120 calories per serving (1/2 cup shelled or about 1 1/8 cups in the pod), edamame packs a powerful nutrient punch. In fact, it’...

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Speed Up a Roast Chicken

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, March 25th, 2013

Roast Chicken With Apple SlawHot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

For a fast weeknight meal, roast two half chickens instead of one whole bird. It takes just 35 minutes (see Food Network Magazine‘s Roast Chicken With Apple Slaw, pictured above). Use a rimmed baking sheet instead of a deep roasting pan (the short sides help the heat circulate evenly). And choose the convection setting on your oven if you have one: You’ll get crisp, golden skin in a hurry.

Restaurant Revisited: Sweet Tea’s Restaurant & Catering

by in Shows, March 24th, 2013

Robert Irvine on Restaurant: ImpossibleAt Sweet Tea’s Restaurant & Catering in Pineville, N.C., problems started almost as soon as they opened for business. After just six months in operation, owners Dana and David Cohen were facing losses of nearly $8,000-$10,000 per month at their Southern-style restaurant, and if drastic changes weren’t made, they’d be forced to shut down in a matter of weeks. Lucky for them, those much-needed updates were made, thanks to Robert Irvine and his Restaurant: Impossible team.

Even before arriving at Sweet Tea’s, Robert knew one crucial reason the restaurant was struggling: its extreme out-of-the-way location and absence of street-side advertising. It was his mission to brand the eatery as a comfortable, welcoming restaurant with Southern food to match, and to accomplish that, Robert would have to remake the menu of what he deemed to be D-rated food. With just two days to work and a $10,000 budget, he reopened the doors of Sweet Tea’s and gave the restaurant — and the Cohen family — a second chance at success. We checked in with Dana a few months after the renovation to find out how the business is doing.

Since Robert left, Dana and David have noticed an increase in revenue at Sweet Tea’s, and they are now “trying so hard to catch up” on bills, Dana tells us. “We need to catch up on rent, and that is the only thing holding us back.”

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