Heritage — Off the Shelf

by in Books, October 24th, 2014

HeritageSean Brock’s new cookbook, Heritage, is easily one of the most-anticipated books of the year. Sean Brock, the Virginia-born executive chef of Husk restaurants in Charleston, S.C., and Nashville, is quickly becoming a titan of Southern cuisine, and the dishes in this book carry his signature blend of elegance and hearty Southern charm. It should be noted right up front that Heritage is not a Husk restaurant cookbook; it’s so much deeper and more thorough than that. Heritage is an edible historical guide to Southern cuisine, and if you give it a chance, it’ll be your new favorite cookbook in no time.

The book is broken down into chapters based on where the ingredients are sourced, including The Garden, The Mill and The Yard, and the introduction includes a whole aside detailing the history of and a recipe for Low-Country Hoppin’ John. Brock also includes for his readers his Manifesto on food, but don’t be fooled: The book doesn’t read like a stuffy, overly structured culinary curriculum. The whole book reads like a love letter to the raw ingredients and agrarians of the South, and getting an inside look at Brock’s passion for preserving Southern heritage seed breeds is a real treat.

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Save Your Pumpkin Seeds: A Simple Roasting How-To

by in Holidays, Recipes, October 24th, 2014

How to Roast Pumpkin SeedsWith Halloween just one week away, you’re likely getting set to carve tricked-out jack-o’-lanterns in preparations for next Friday’s fright night. As you roll up your sleeves and scoop out the mushy innards of your pumpkin, keep an eye out for the seeds; these flat, tear-shaped bites are indeed edible, and when they’re roasted with seasoning, they turn into crunchy, savory bites ideal for seasonal snacking. Learn the basics of How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds below, then check out Food Network’s complete guide to master the easy technique.

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25 Ways to Use Sauerkraut

by , October 24th, 2014

Oktoberfest in Germany may have ended, but you can keep the celebrations going all month long.

Sauerkraut, a traditional German fermented cabbage, isn’t just a delicious hot dog topping or stuffing for Reuben sandwiches. It contains probiotics (those same ones found in yogurt), which help maintain healthy stomach functions, so eat up!

Break out a beer stein and your lederhosen to prepare these delicious sauerkraut-stuffed dishes.

1. All you need to make Alton Brown’s Sauerkraut recipe is cabbage, some spices and a fair amount of time; it takes about two weeks for the cabbage to ferment. Pickling salt is a fine-grain pure salt that doesn’t contain additives like anti-caking agents or iodine that other cooking salts may have.
2. Rachael Ray’s Reuben-Style Casserole with Pastrami Meatballs, Sauerkraut and Barley is an easy make-ahead meal, perfect to warm you up on chilly fall evenings.
3. If you’re an adventurous baker, make Beer and Sauerkraut Fudge Cupcakes with Beer Frosting.
4. Serve Michael Symon’s Bratwurst Stewed with Sauerkraut (pictured above) on a baguette at your next tailgate.
5. A simple Sauerkraut Soup with Sausage is hearty enough to be a full meal.
6. Cook Good Luck Pork and Sauerkraut low and slow on the stovetop or in the slow cooker for meat so tender it falls right off the bones.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by , October 24th, 2014

Scale
In this week’s news: Gluten-free diets spark a grain of concern; slow and steady may not win the weight-loss race; and that regrettably fattening lunch may have been your brain’s fault.

Gluten-free Gotcha?

For people with celiac disease or ...

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What to Watch: Have One Last Halloween Hurrah with Food Network This Weekend

by in Shows, October 24th, 2014

Alton BrownGet all of your Halloween programming in before the big day. It may be hard to believe, but the hallowed event is almost here, and before you run out and scramble to get that last-minute costume, you should tune in to Food Network for some spooky inspiration. And you definitely don’t want to miss out on the season finale of Halloween Wars. All of that ghoulish competition has culminated in this. Be sure to catch The Pioneer Woman, The Kitchen, Rewrapped, Sandwich King, Giada at Home, Southern at Heart and Farmhouse Rules, too, as they celebrate Halloween and its sweet fare.

If you’re looking for something savory rather than the saccharine cuisine of Halloween, watch Trisha’s Southern Kitchen for recipes like Chicken-Fried Steak, Spinach with Bacon and Onions, and Baked Macaroni and Cheese. Guy’s Big Bite also offers a balanced meal of Crispy Cornflake Chicken Sliders and Mexican Mac ‘n’ Cheese. Also, Cutthroat Kitchen and Guy’s Grocery Games are the perfect spine-tingling way to end a weekend of thrills.

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Rice: A Side Dish Takes Center Stage

by in News, October 23rd, 2014

Easy Parmesan For most of us here in the United States, rice may not always have seemed like the most-inspiring food: Plain, white, bland, sometimes mushy, the stuff our mothers served us was something we may have eaten with little relish. (Sorry, Mom.)

Recently, however, rice’s rep has been changing. Increasingly, American consumers’ palates are expanding to encompass more sophisticated (and more expensive) varieties — like jasmine, basmati, brown and black rice, wild rice, red rice and other exotic blends. Rice sales are growing, the Wall Street Journal reports, and while white long-grain rice is still preferred by many, “specialty” rice is starting to soak up more of the market.

So what, exactly, is driving this trend toward exotic grains? Factors may include our growing interest in foods that are “authentic” and unusual, as well as our desire to make healthier choices — opting for varieties that are higher in fiber or protein, according to the Journal. Plus, the fact that rice is gluten-free probably isn’t hurting sales, given the current popularity of avoiding the protein found in wheat and many other grains.

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Pie Baked Apples — The Weekender

by in Recipes, October 23rd, 2014

Pie Baked ApplesThis time of year, many of us make the trek out to our closest U-Pick farms to load up on sweet, crisp apples. It’s easy to get carried away by the fresh air and autumnal abundance, and what looked like a reasonable amount of fruit in the orchard becomes an overwhelming volume once you cart it into your kitchen.

So, you start cooking. You make a big batch of applesauce for the freezer. You bake up a pan of apple crisp for dessert (or breakfast, topped with a scoop of plain yogurt). You slice the apples and stack them with peanut butter. You take a sackful to work, hoping your co-workers will help you out. And still, there are more apples.

If this sounds like a familiar story, may I suggest a fun little dessert that comes together quickly, tastes like a treat and still manages to put the focus on the whole fruit? A cross between traditional pie and baked apples, these Pie Baked Apples have you scoop out the interior apple flesh, toss it with a little sugar and spices, and pack it back into the empty apples. You top them with some store-bought pie crust, then bake them until they’re tender and brown.

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6 Desserts to Cook Low and Slow — Fall Fest

by in Recipes, October 23rd, 2014

Slow-Cooker Peach CobblerListen here: Your slow cooker is meant for a whole lot more than endless vats of smoky chili and comforting stews. Though we turn back the dial for hours on end for some of our favorite meals, it’s about time we rethink this kitchen tool with recipes that are a whole lot sweeter. These perfect-for-fall slow-cooker dessert recipes cook low and slow, rather than hold up your oven or hog all of your time.

1. There will be no more sliding peach cobbler into the oven, thanks to Alton Brown’s recipe for Slow-Cooker Peach Cobbler (pictured above). This warm, comforting recipe calls for frozen peaches, so you can make it year-round.

2. It’s hard to believe that a pan of brownies doesn’t always have first dibs on the oven, but sometimes you need that extra space. Easy-to-make Slow-Cooker Gooey Brownie Cake has all the perks of a soft warm brownie, from the gooey center to the crispy edges.

3. Slow-Cooker Banana Upside-Down Cake relies on your slow cooker to caramelize the bananas with rum and brown sugar, before you pour the cake batter on top for easy baking. After you invert the cake from the cooker, all of that slow-earned heat is best taken with a countering scoop of vanilla ice cream.

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Alton Cooks the Superstar Sabotage Tournament: Steak

by in Recipes, Shows, October 23rd, 2014

At its most basic, a surf and turf dish includes one seafood and one land-based element, so on this week’s Cutthroat Kitchen: Superstar Sabotage tournament Heat 3 battle, host Alton Brown stretched that definition to include inferior versions of those components when he auctioned off ingredient swaps that included canned tuna for surf and liver for turf. For fans watching at home, surf and turf most likely connotes a dinner of lobster and steak, and likely an elegant one at that, but when it comes to steak, it doesn’t have to be saved for a special occasion.

If you don’t often make steak at home, try Alton’s simplest-ever recipe as a go-to starting place. His Pan-Seared Rib Eye (pictured above) boasts more than 500 user reviews and a glowing 5-star rating. Best of all, since his foolproof technique suggests making the steak on the stove, there’s no grilling required, which means you can enjoy meaty flavors year-round.

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