Exclusive Interview with the Latest Food Truck Team to Exit the Race

by in Shows, September 14th, 2014

The Great Food Truck RaceOn this week’s episode of The Great Food Truck Race, the teams headed to St. Louis. Right away Tyler Florence had the rookies start on their Speed Bump challenge, which would have them earning their seed money for a change. In a surprise twist, Tyler visited each truck to do some quality control and found everyone’s dishes were lacking. The next day he sent the teams out on a Truck Stop cooking challenge, the reward of which had the potential to save one team from elimination. Unfortunately it didn’t play out that way. FN Dish has the exclusive exit interview with the latest team cut from the race.

Find Out Which Team Was Eliminated

Pumpkin Rice Pudding — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, September 14th, 2014

Pumpkin Rice Pudding

Let’s face it: Fall is almost here. And while warm weather will be missed, the addition of apple and pumpkin back into our repertoire is more than welcome. This week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week is a comforting rice pudding made with 2-percent milk and sweetened with honey for a satisfying treat that won’t weigh you down.

For more fall-focused recipes, check out Food Network’s Let’s Get Seasonal: Fall board on Pinterest.

Get the Recipe: Pumpkin Rice Pudding

Nomiku Immersion Circulator Lets You Cook From Your Phone

by , September 14th, 2014

Affordable immersion circulators, which allow home chefs to participate in the restaurant-friendly sous vide method of cooking, have really caught on the last couple of years. Sure, these circulators can whip up a perfect piece of meat or fish, but can they go online? They sure couldn’t, until now. Finally, sous vide machines have gone social (?!)

Introducing the newest edition of the Nomiku, an immersion circulator with full wi-fi functionality. Why on Earth would you want that? Well, to Facebook stalk the sous vide machines you went to high school with, of course. In actuality, it brings some neat functionality to the mix. Nomiku 2.0 lets you control the machine via any web-connected device, which means you can actually use your phone to cook stuff while you are not at home. Also, you can ‘download’ heat and time information from other machines to copy a tasty something they managed to pull off. Pretty cool.

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Don’t Steal Sandwiches, and Other Office-Kitchen Etiquette Tips

by in News, September 13th, 2014

RefrigeratorIf you’ve ever had your sandwich or leftover pasta stolen from the company fridge by some scoundrel without a scrap of morals or shred of sympathy for your growling stomach, you’ll want to check out this hilarious series of photos telling the episodic, presumably satirical story of an office sandwich stealer and his hapless, hungry victim, posted on CollegeHumor.com.

Initially, the Internet seemed unsure that the epic exchange of notes hadn’t actually happened, but one commenter did a fine job summing up the most-likely verdict: “Fake, yet based in reality, which helps make it funny.”

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Takeout Fake-Out: Your Restaurant Favorites, Delivered

by in Recipes, September 13th, 2014

Sweet and Sour PorkEven on those nights when it seems like the only quick option for dinner is delivery, think again, because with the help of a well-stocked pantry, you can turn out your favorite takeout orders at home in a hurry — and they’re often healthier than the originals. On this morning’s all-new episode of The Kitchen, Cooking Channel’s Ching-He Huang introduced her take on a Chinese takeout staple, Kung Po Chicken; it’s ready to eat in only 20 minutes, and on busy weeknights after school and work, such a timesaver is a welcome addition to your dinner repertoire. For more homemade renditions of your favorite Asian-inspired recipes, read on below to find three classic picks, each a healthy option ready to eat in fewer than 30 minutes.

A lightened-up take on traditional sweet-and-sour dishes, Food Network Magazine’s Sweet and Sour Pork (pictured above) is made with lean pork tenderloin, and it’s quickly stir-fried instead of being battered and deep-fried, to guarantee crispy, juicy results. Mix up a tangy sauce with balsamic, soy sauce and ketchup to coat the pork, and add snow peas and carrots for freshness and bright color.

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Group of Scientists Create Working Chocolate Teapot

by , September 13th, 2014

There’s an old saying that denotes uselessness by comparing something to a chocolate teapot. After all, chocolate melts in your mouth and, well, mouths clock in at a tepid 98.6 degrees (mouths attached to the flu-infected withstanding.) Well, science has finally cracked that particular choco-code. Here is an actual chocolate teapot that makes tea and not a bizarre tea-like chocolate sludge.

Master chocolatier John Costello and a team of scientists created the handy, and edible, teapot in York, England. The trick was using pure, dark chocolate for the base and to finish it by building a series of silicon layers. The result? A perfect cup of tea, albeit one with a slight chocolate after-taste. It’s a chocolate miracle!

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Best 5 Apple Crisp Recipes

by in Recipes, September 13th, 2014

Apple CrispUnlike pies, which require gently rolling out two sheets of dough, crisps necessitate little more than mixing up a sweet, crumbly mixture and sprinkling it atop the fruit on the bottom. From cherries and berries to tart rhubarb and juicy peaches, the options for crisp fillings are endless, but come autumn, seasonal apples are a favorite choice. Read on below to check out Food Network’s top-five apple crisp recipes to find dessert inspiration from Sunny Anderson, Alex Guarnaschelli, Pat and Gina Neely, Ina Garten and more chefs.

5. Baked Apple with Crisp Topping — Think of Sunny’s take on apple crisp as a composed alternative to the traditional casserole-style presentation. Instead of slicing the apples into multiple pieces, she simply halves the fruit, then bakes each portion with a brown sugar-cinnamon topping.

4. Apple Crisp — “I would love to take full credit for this recipe, but it is simply the recipe my mother made year after year when I was growing up,” Alex says. “So simple and delicious.”

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Biscuits and Chocolate Gravy — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, September 12th, 2014

Biscuits and Chocolate GravyWhat? Biscuits and Chocolate Gravy. That sounds like something a devious 6-year-old would make up, doesn’t it? Tender, buttery biscuits enrobed in dark, rich rivulets of creamy, chocolate gravy. Yes, it may sound very Willy Wonka-inspired, but Biscuits and Chocolate Gravy is actually a very old-school traditional breakfast of the Upland South.

People talk about Southern food as if it’s one cuisine, when in actuality it has many variations and subtleties, often region by region. The South can be subdivided into two principal larger areas: the Upper South and the Lower, or Deep, South. The Upper, or Upland, South is the northern border of what we define as the South in the United States. It runs from Virginia and North Carolina westward through West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee and Arkansas, dipping into the northern realms of Alabama and Georgia. The Upland South doesn’t conform neatly to state lines, but instead is influenced by the terrain, history and culture. It’s the landscape of a diverse society and what could generally be defined as Appalachia, an area at once both incredibly poor and culturally rich.

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