Italian Wedding Soup — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, August 18th, 2013

Italian Wedding SoupThe summer heat may still be beating down upon us, but craving a bowl of soup is a year-round comfort. This week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week, Food Network Magazine’s Italian Wedding Soup, gets a twist with the addition of orzo, a tiny rice-shaped pasta that adds a delicate texture.

For more everyday recipe inspiration, visit Food Network’s Let’s Get Healthy board on Pinterest.

Get the recipe: Food Network Magazine’s Italian Wedding Soup

Herb of the Month: Lovage

by , August 18th, 2013

lovage

Have you even heard of this fresh herb? Here’s why lovage deserves some love.

Lovage Basics
When the plant is young, its bright green stalks and feathery leaves may resemble parsley, but with a lighter color. The beautifully pointy leaves omit...

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How to Microwave Corn

by in How-to, August 17th, 2013

How to Microwave CornNow that there’s corn at every farmers market, we’re spending a lot of time husking it while wondering if there’s a better way. Last year, a video came out addressing this predicament that immediately went viral, racking up, at last count, more than 7 million YouTube views. In it, an adorable gentleman claimed that if you steamed corn in the microwave and then shook it out of the husk, it would slide out well-cooked and completely clean of husk and silk. We had to see this technique in action for ourselves. Our conclusion? Microwaving corn on the cob works, and it’s delicious. The corn comes out perfectly tender — with not a string of silk in sight.

Get the step-by-step photos

How to Make a Perfect Burger — Weekend Cookout

by in Recipes, August 17th, 2013

How to Make a Perfect BurgerWhile burgers are one of summer’s quintessential dishes and an ever-popular pick at backyard barbecues everywhere, cooking the ultimate between-the-bun creation takes patience and a bit of know-how. It’s not enough to simply slap some meat into a patty, flop it on the grill and melt cheese on top, as doing so has likely led to sorry results at least once or twice — or more. The kind of meat you buy, plus how you form the patties and the way in which they’re cooked all contribute to the overall taste and texture of the burger. Check out a few of Food Network’s top tips below for crafting a perfect burger at home, then browse step-by-step snapshots to learn more about how it’s done.

Fat Equals Flavor:
You may want to save the calorie-trimming for another meal, because making burgers isn’t the time to skimp on fat in your ground beef. Opt for ground chuck blended with about 20 percent fat (this will likely be advertised in stores as an 80/20 mixture), and season it simply with just salt and pepper to allow the taste of the meat and char to shine through between the bun.

Flat-Top Rules:
How many times have you formed a seemingly flat beef patty only to have it dome up while cooking? Prevent those humps and turn out level burgers every time by pressing your finger into the center of one side of the raw patty before it’s placed on the grill. That indent will account for the growth in height while cooking and ensure the final product is even.

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Enter for a Chance to Win a Shed Barbecue T-Shirt

by in Contests, August 16th, 2013

Enter for a Chance to Win a Shed Barbecue T-ShirtWhen you walk through The Shed doors for the very first time, you’re in awe. There’s so much hustle and bustle happening around the grounds — from barbecue flying out the kitchen doors and blues music outside on the stage to the First Family of Mississippi Barbecue making you feel as though you’re one of them, it’s a one-of-a-kind experience. Scotty recently told FN Dish, “The first time you walk into The Shed, you’re a stranger. The second time, you’re family.” When customers are in the dining room or at any one of the picnic tables outside, there’s an instant feeling of wanting to be a Shedhed, a term the Orrisons have coined for their customers. Now you can be. You’ll see Brad, Brooke, Momma and Daddy-O sporting Shed shirts (like Coal Miner pictured above), as well as all their staff — each donning a different color, making it their own by cutting it up, drawing on it or tying it into braids.

Can’t get down to Ocean Springs, Miss., anytime soon but want to feel like you’re a part of the family? You can buy a Shed Barbecue T-shirt here, or enter in the comment field below for a chance to win one (colors vary). To enter: Tell us which Shedhed is your favorite and why in the comments. We’re giving 10 lucky, randomly selected winners each a T-shirt.

Read official rules before entering

Get Ready to Roll This Sunday with The Great Food Truck Race

by in Shows, August 16th, 2013

The Great Food Truck RaceThis Sunday at 9pm/8c, The Great Food Truck Race, Season 4 premieres with all-new trucks, cities and challenges. It’s going to be the longest route yet for the food truck rookies, who will learn to operate a mobile business right on the road. But if that wasn’t enough, host Tyler Florence will be throwing Speed Bumps and Truck Stop challenges at them to see how they do: It could be anything from completely making over the menu to selling at a breakneck pace in order to be the first to win a cash prize. At the end of the race only one team will be left standing with $50,000 and the keys to their truck.

The teams talk about the new season

Creamed Corn Succotash with Cotija — The Weekender

by in In Season, Recipes, August 16th, 2013

Creamed Corn Succotash with CojitaThe first 25 years of my life, I ate fresh corn just one way: It was shucked, boiled until tender and slathered with butter. And while that’s a delicious way to handle the sweet corn of summer, I’ve learned during the last decade that there are many other ways to do it justice.

It was a batch of grilled corn that first opened my eyes to corn’s flexibility. I was at a cookout and a friend set shucked and lightly oiled cobs on a hot barbecue and kept turning them until the kernels were speckled and golden. Topped with mayonnaise and a little grated cheese, it was transcendentally good.

Once the corn floodgates were open, it was a quick trip to corn salads, salsas and chowders. Really, the only thing I’ve not done with corn is make jelly from the corncobs (a traditional Southern preserve).

This summer, the corn has been particularly abundant, and we’ve been getting a dozen or more ears each week at our farm share pickup. I’ve done every one of my regular preparations, and still, there’s more. Happily, I’ve recently discovered another recipe to add to my repertoire. It’s Bobby Flay’s Creamed Corn Succotash with Cotija, and I can’t stop eating it.

Before you start cooking, read these tips

Chef Wanted: Abigaile Update

by in Shows, August 15th, 2013

Chef Wanted AbigaileChef WantedJed Sanford, the owner of Abigaile, a gastrobrewery in Hermosa Beach, Calif., needed a chef de cuisine for the restaurant while he and his executive chef Tin Vuong open a sister restaurant. They were looking for someone who could keep pushing the restaurant’s edge. Anne Burrell and the Chef Wanted team had four candidates: Chefs Juan Pedrosa, Ben Diaz, Chris Mack and Jamil Peden. Two initial tests would narrow down the chefs to two finalists, who would each get to run the restaurant’s dinner service on separate nights. In the end, both Jed and Tin were clear in their decision, which was a surprise for both chefs.

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