A Cherry Tomato Salad Kids Can Appreciate

by in Family, September 10th, 2013

A Cherry Tomato Salad Kids Can AppreciateFirst things first, don’t call a dish a “salad.” Most kids don’t like salad or the thought of a salad. Try something more fun like, “We’re having a cherry tomato surprise!” Most kids like surprises.

Next, let them get involved. For this particular easy late-summer dish, even the tiniest hands can help. I slice the tomatoes and my 2-year-old puts them into a bowl. Same goes for the basil. I handle the onions (and more on this in a second), then our 4-year-old adds the olive oil and helps to gently stir.

So the onions. Yes, I left in the long slices of red onion. I know most kids don’t like onions, but there are usually two ways to approach this: Make the onions so small kids won’t see and taste them or make them big enough to easily avoid. We went with the latter. And it worked.

July/August’s Name This Dish Contest Winner

by in Food Network Magazine, September 10th, 2013

name this dish fried chicken

Each month, thousands of Food Network Magazine readers submit clever names for the back page’s Name This Dish contest. Previous dishes include a frozen drink (winning name: “Gulp of Mexico“), fried ice cream (“Fryer and Ice“) and even corn-crab deviled eggs (“Fish and Chicks“). In the July/August 2013 issue, we asked readers to dream up names for this coconut fried chicken (pictured above). Some of our favorites were:

Currybian Chicken
Jeanette Vilches
La Puente, Calif.

Polynesian Drums
Chris Davis
Jackson, Tenn.

More favorites and the winner announced

Fourth Annual Pig Island Brought the Bacon — and All Things Pork

by in Events, September 9th, 2013

Zarela MartinezPork lovers from all over New York City came out on a perfect late-summer Saturday to attend the fourth annual Pig Island, which was held on the waterfront in Red Hook, Brooklyn, to help support local businesses, farms and restaurants recovering from Hurricane Sandy. The event featured 25 local chefs, all cooking with whole pigs, and other businesses including local craft breweries and New York state wineries. The food was an outstanding display of all the dishes that can be made from pork. You name it, Pig Island had it: pork tacos, pulled pork, porchetta, lechon, pork kebab, sausage, dessert made with bacon and more.

Food Network fans would be excited to know that Chopped judge Alex Guarnaschelli’s Butter Restaurant was present, offering Butter McMuffins with Plum Jam and Lardo-Glazed Cinnamon Rolls that were out of this world. Mexican chef, restaurateur and cookbook author Zarela Martinez (pictured above), who also happens to be Chopped judge Aarón Sánchez’s mom, was serving up Oaxacan-style Puerco Relleno, a whole-stuffed pork with fruit and vegetable picadillo. FN Dish was on hand to taste the amazingly flavorful pork dishes. See photos of these and the rest of our favorites below.

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Enter for a Chance to Win Sunny Anderson’s First Cookbook

by in Books, Contests, September 9th, 2013

Sunny's Kitchen Cookbook Giveaway

Sunny Anderson’s first cookbook, Sunny’s Kitchen, has been a dream in the making — since she was 16 years old in fact. Growing up in a military family, Sunny traveled the world. “Food was the glue that held us together as we moved from place to place,” Sunny says. Sunny’s Kitchen will offer readers her whole world in just a few bites. Through breakfast, mains, starchy sides and desserts, Sunny draws upon international flavors, as well as local inspirations. Fans of hers will also get a glimpse into her kitchen, family photos and stories that connect the recipes she shares with the moments and people that mean a great deal to her. Rarely does a cookbook make you feel so connected to the author. Take the time to read the foreword, Sunny’s intro and her tips in “how to cook, for real.” It’s worth it. Want to flip through the pages yourself? FN Dish is giving away five autographed copies of Sunny’s debut cookbook to randomly selected winners.

You can buy Sunny’s new cookbook here, or enter for a chance to win one now. To enter: Tell FN Dish which Sunny recipe is your favorite in the comments (you must include the recipe URL). We’re giving five lucky, randomly selected winners each an autographed copy of the book.

Read official rules before entering

Fried Green Tomato Sandwiches — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, September 9th, 2013

Fried Green Tomato SandwichesBefore another tomato season comes to a close and you say goodbye to summer’s fresh caprese salads, bruschetta, gazpacho and pasta sauce, you should surely indulge in one of the season’s simplest pleasures: a fried green tomato sandwich. Nothing more than an unripe tomato, a green tomato is firm and drier than its red and yellow counterparts, which means it can sustain a coating of batter and won’t fall apart in hot oil.

A dressed-up version of the original, Food Network Magazine’s recipe for easy-to-make Fried Green Tomato Sandwiches (pictured above) features just a few key components: green tomatoes, of course, plus a creamy, spicy sauce, sliced bread (something slightly soft works best so it absorbs the sauce) and a topping of yellow and red tomatoes. The juiciness of ripe tomatoes works well for the topping, as their moisture adds welcome sweetness. To add extra flavor to the green beauties, Food Network Magazine pickles them with dill before frying, then triple coats them in layers of egg wash and cornmeal with chili powder. Once the green tomatoes golden brown and crispy on the outside, build the sandwich with both the fried and raw tomatoes and a smear of mayonnaise-scallion sauce. This spread features a few dashes of hot and Worcestershire sauces, which together create a tangy taste that cuts through the richness of the dish.

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Pound Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, September 9th, 2013

pork scallopini saladFor a super fast dinner, pound your meat before grilling or sauteing it: Thinner pieces cook quickly (check out Food Network Magazine‘s Pork Scallopini Salad). Pounding also breaks up the connective tissue in tougher cuts, making them more tender. Place the meat between pieces of plastic wrap, and pound to an even thickness with the flat side of a meat mallet, a rolling pinor a small heavy skillet.

Planning Under Pressure — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, September 8th, 2013

No matter how prepared a chef may be when he walks into Cutthroat Kitchen, or how well-conceived his ideas are for one round’s challenge dish, he can’t say for certain whether he’ll be able to use those skills or his thought-out plan, as a sabotage may ultimately get the better of him. The key to success in this contest is a competitor’s ability to adapt to culinary interferences as he meets them — finding new ways to add flavor to food when salt isn’t an option and learning how to fashion utensils out of foil when traditional devices are prohibited, among them.

But what happens when, whether because of strategic game play or simple good fortune, a chef has the opportunity — the time, ingredients and equipment — to make just what he had intended?

In the latest installment of Alton’s After-Show, the host and this week’s judge, Antonia Lofaso, dished on the competitors’ seeming need to do more and cook more than they ought to have or needed to simply because they could.

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Interview with the Latest Food Truck Team Out of the Race

by in Shows, September 8th, 2013

Food TrucksThe five remaining teams came into Rapid City, S.D., on Episode 4 of The Great Food Truck Race with a goal in mind. For some it was keeping their previous leads, but for others it was breaking out of the middle of the pack or stopping a downward spiral. A Speed Bump didn’t do much to break the teams’ resolve, and a Truck Stop challenge involving buffalo just made them even more determined to follow through. However, a bad choice of location and poor planning resulted in low sales for one team. At elimination, a team that had held a lead in a previous stop took a nosedive to the bottom.

SPOILER ALERT: Find Out Which Team Was Eliminated