Best 5 BBQ Ribs

by in Recipes, June 6th, 2013

Backyard Baby Back RibsAlong with hot dogs, burgers and potato salad, tender, juicy barbecued ribs are a cookout classic and ideal for relaxed, casual entertaining. Whether you like pork ribs or beef, a thick coating of saucy glaze or a simple dry rub, there’s a rib recipe to please every palate, and Food Network’s top-five picks below are five-star favorites that won’t disappoint. Check out these top-rated barbecued ribs from Sandra, the Neelys, Alton and more Food Network chefs to find out how to make their no-fail recipes at home.

5. Seattle BBQ Beef Ribs — Before grilling the ribs with a tangy topping of store-bought barbecue sauce and molasses, Sandra precooks them by boiling the rack in a mixture of vegetable broth and apple juice, ensuring that the meat turns out moist and is ready to eat in a flash.

4. Sweet Cola Ribs — The Neelys say, “The smoke and indirect heat leave you with deliciously tender ribs while the cola packs a punch of unexpected sweetness.” The key to making their recipe is not adding the cola glaze until the end of cooking, so as not to burn the sugars.

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PHOTOS: Behind the Scenes Moments From Episode One

by , June 5th, 2013

Behind the Scenes of Food Network StarEach episode of Star takes hours to tape, so it’s no surprise that not every moment and reaction is captured in the 60 minutes fans get to see on air. Every week, Star Talk will give readers an insider’s look at what goes down on the set of Food Network Star — from the judges to the contestants to the environments in which they cook and present.

Click here to browse the entire gallery of photos from Episode 1 now

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11 Things You Didn’t Know About Geoffrey Zakarian

by in Shows, June 5th, 2013

Geoffrey ZakarianYou’ve seen them judge the competition, battle for the title of All-Stars champion and compete in a friendly game with colleagues on After Hours, but there’s a lot you don’t know about the judges of Chopped. Here’s your chance to get to know the nine people behind the Chopping Block.

Geoffrey Zakarian is the chef of The Lambs Club and The National, both in New York City. His former New York City restaurants, Town and Country, both received three stars from The New York Times. Besides his judging duties on Chopped, you’ll also find Geoffrey on Iron Chef America. He won the title of Iron Chef in the third season of The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs. One thing you might not have known about Geoffrey is that if he hadn’t become a chef, he might have been a concert pianist.

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Farro With Pesto and Kale

by , June 5th, 2013

farro with pesto and kale
This is a go-to recipe in my house as it pleases the masses. I serve it cold in the winter and cool in the spring and summer. Swapping ingredients for the greens or herbs makes it perfect for any season. I like getting creative when I make pesto to ...

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You Asked Food Network Stars

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, June 5th, 2013

May issue of Food Network Magazine

Food Network stars answer your burning questions from the May issue of Food Network Magazine.

Guy, recipes often ask for different kinds of mustard — dry, ground, yellow. Does it really matter which I use?
Anja Martin from Thrall, Texas

Yes, it does matter. The reason has to do with intensity. It’s best to use the one the recipe calls for the first time around and then take the liberty to tweak to your taste after. For me, the hotter the mustard, the better!
— Guy Fieri

Sunny, some men hate it when their significant others pick food off their plates — and my man is no exception. But for some reason, there is always a bite on his plate that calls my name. How do I take it off his plate without irritating him?
Kathleen Sebastian from Richmond, Calif.

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Punched Up! Colorful Potatoes Kids Love

by in Family, June 5th, 2013

Colorful Potatoes Kids LoveFrench fries aside, my kids don’t exactly clamor for potatoes. I’ve made them all sorts of ways: oven-roasted fries, mashed with kale and Parmesan cheese, smashed with Greek yogurt, steamed with butter and herbs — and while those options have all had their ups and downs, this technique is the one that brought actual squeals to the table.

The trick was a simple bag of colored potatoes along with a set of vegetable cutters. Together they produced a giggle fest of interest before our girls even tried the potatoes. Before I even baked them. What color will the potato be inside? Will there be stars or hearts? Can I mix them up in the oil?

For roasted potatoes, my favorite way to go is extra-virgin olive oil, garlic pushed through the press, salt and a couple rounds of pepper out of the grinder. Dump all that along with the potatoes right onto a baking sheet, mix with bare hands, spread out and roast at 425 degrees F for about 25 minutes, depending on the size of the potato pieces. Flip them once along the way.

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