9 Peachy-Keen Recipes (That Aren’t Dessert)

by in In Season, Recipes, July 25th, 2016

Tomato Peach SaladWe’re all about peach cobblers and peach pies in the summer, but if all you’re making with this juicy fruit is dessert, you’re seriously missing out. Peaches are at their peak of juicy sweetness for just a short time in the summer, and it’s best to make the most of those glorious days. Read more

Rachael’s Sesame Soba Noodles — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, July 25th, 2016

Sesame Soba Noodles Food NetworkIf you’re anything like us, all you crave for dinner on a Monday night is the salty convenience of takeout. Thanks to Rachael Ray and her 30-minute meals, you can make an Asian-inspired noodle dish at home in less time than it would take to have it delivered. Read more

It’s Pilot Time with the Gold Standard for Food Network Star Success — Alex’s Star Report

by , July 25th, 2016

Food Network StarWe are down to the final three Food Network Star competitors: Jernard, Tregaye and Damiano. What a season! I don't know about you, but I feel like the cream has definitely risen to the top in this pack of finalists. I just can't really decide who...

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What Do I Do with Swiss Chard?

by in In Season, Recipes, July 24th, 2016

Swiss Chard BunchesSwiss chard (also known simply as chard) is a leafy green vegetable that is related to beets and spinach. It is rich in vitamins A, C and especially K, and it is also a good source of magnesium, iron and potassium. Chard can be steamed or sauteed, and it’s great in soups, stews, casseroles, frittatas and quiches. Young leaves can be eaten raw in salads.

Chard always has green leaves, but the stalks can be a variety of colors. Rainbow chard is an assortment of different varieties, with stalks of red, pink, orange, yellow and white. The colors will fade somewhat in the cooking process, but boy are they pretty to look at when uncooked! Chard stems take a little longer to cook than the leaves, but the whole plant is edible and delicious. It’s a little bit sweet in the stems (which have a slight celery-like flavor) and pleasantly bitter in the leaves. Some people prefer to remove the stems from the leaves and cook them separately. If the stems are thin and tender, this step can be skipped.

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Ina’s Baked Lemon Chicken — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, July 24th, 2016

Lemon Chicken BreastsOur favorite dinner recipes are those super-simple dishes that still pack tons of flavor. Ina Garten’s top-rated Lemon Chicken Breasts are just that — and they’re this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week. Ina’s marinade is made with classically bold flavor: fresh garlic, white wine, zesty lemon and herbs. Just place the chicken breasts over the sauce and bake until moist and tender.

For more easy dinner inspiration, check out Food Network’s Let’s Cook: 5-Star Recipes board on Pinterest.

Get the Recipe: Lemon Chicken Breasts

Why Panzanella Should Be the Official Salad of Summer

by in Recipes, July 24th, 2016

Summer dining is all about ease and convenience, so if you’re agonizing over the perfect salad to pair with your pork tenderloin or grilled chicken, you’re seriously overthinking it. Intricate slaws that require a half-hour of chopping and grain salads that require you to boil water get a lot of hype at this time of year, but we think there’s a superior option that best encapsulates the easy, laid-back nature of summer dining. Let us introduce panzanella, a traditional Italian salad made with day-old bread, olive oil, tomatoes and basil. These are just the staples, as many modern recipes go above and beyond the call of duty by featuring cucumber, bell pepper, red onion and more of the season’s finest produce. But what we love the most about this hearty dish is the fact that it has the potential to reduce food waste. That’s right: The crustier the bread, the better. So before you even think about tossing that half loaf of stale bread on your countertop, check out these quick, easy and flavorful panzanellas from Food Network.

Panzanella
Cucumber, red onion, basil and heirloom tomatoes are mixed together to create an eye-catching rainbow of edible color in Ree Drummond’s rustic bread salad. When selecting the bread, go for a crustier loaf that will hold its shape against the olive oil and red wine vinegar dressing. If you want to avoid using the oven, you can cut up the bread and let it dry out at room temperature overnight.

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Chefs’ Picks: Homemade Ice Cream

by in Restaurants, July 23rd, 2016

No Churn Vanilla Ice Cream with Cinnamon Cereal

Chefs’ Picks tracks down what the pros are eating and cooking from coast to coast.

When the temperature soars, the pros call upon a classic summertime staple to stave off a heat-induced meltdown: ice cream. We talked to chefs across the country to find out which do-it-yourself versions of this frozen dessert they favor. Get inspired to create your own scoops that will keep you coolly surfing through the next heat wave, cone in hand.

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Would You Drink a Latte That’s Blue?

by in News, July 23rd, 2016

Would You Drink a Latte That’s Blue?What is it with the blue drinks, people?

A few weeks ago, we told you about a blue wine (a deep royal blue, if we’re getting specific about our hues) being launched by a group of Spanish entrepreneurs. Now comes news that the cerulean-sipping trend is extending to the world of hot beverages as well.

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6 Treats That Bring the Beach to You

by in Recipes, July 23rd, 2016

Ocean Blue Boozy MilkshakeEven if you can’t spend every summer day splashing in the waves, searching for seashells or lounging under a giant umbrella, a beachy snack is never too far away. These adorable ideas will turn even a rainy, decidedly non-beach day into a little summer celebration.

Ocean Blue Boozy Milkshakes (above)

Blue curacao liqueur blends with vanilla ice cream to create an indulgent shake that mimics the hues of the sea. Topped with whipped cream, the drink looks like a gentle wave crashing against the shoreline.

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The Great Lobster Roll Debate: Maine Style Versus Connecticut Style

by in Recipes, July 22nd, 2016

Left: Maine-style lobster roll | Right: Connecticut-style lobster roll

Anyone born and raised in New England will tell you that nothing epitomizes summer like a heap of sweet lobster meat piled onto a soft, buttery hot dog bun — a treat that’s best enjoyed with a side of piping-hot French fries and clear ocean views. A New Englander will also tell you there are two main variations on the theme, Maine style and Connecticut style, and natives of both states are known to fiercely defend their regional recipe as the gold standard of lobster rolls. To an outsider, the differences are subtle; many sandwiches come with a leaf of soft Bibb lettuce, a spritz of lemon juice, salt and black pepper. But a true aficionado knows that the differences between these predominant styles of roll are a bit more nuanced. Not sure you could spot the difference? Find out how to do it, below.

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