Behind the Booklet: 50 Slaws

by in Food Network Magazine, June 1st, 2013

Classic Slaw Recipe
Slaws are the ultimate summer salad: They are fresh and crisp, can be prepared hours in advance and make the perfect companion to grilled foods. In Food Network Magazine‘s June booklet, you get 50 awesome slaws to fulfill all your summer needs. But because we here in the Test Kitchen have too many ideas for our own good, we had a few slaw recipes left over that just couldn’t fit into the booklet. One of them is particularly special because of its longevity: It’s delicious in the summer, but transitions wonderfully into the cooler months. The combination of pear, endive, red cabbage, maple, cranberries and pecans will feel as at home on your Labor Day table as it will in your Thanksgiving spread.

Pear Endive Slaw With Maple Dressing: Combine (4-5 cups) 1/2 head thinly sliced red cabbage with 1 tablespoon kosher salt for 1 hour. Rinse well and pat dry. Whisk 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, 2 tablespoons champagne vinegar, 3 tablespoons maple syrup; add 1/4 cup oil. Toss on cabbage with 3 sliced endives, 2 sliced pears, and 1/2 cup each dried cranberries and toasted chopped pecans.

Crunchy Salad With Cocoa Vinaigrette — The Weekender

by in Entertaining, Recipes, May 31st, 2013

Crunchy Salad With Cocoa VinaigretteI learned to make basic vinaigrettes when I was in my early 20s. It was my first summer in Philadelphia and I was living alone in my grandmother’s old apartment. She had always been more of an entertainer than a cook, so my inherited kitchen featured every kind of cocktail glass, but not much in the way of durable cookware.

Her library of cookbooks was equally paltry. There was a community cookbook compiled to raise funds for the Philadelphia Orchestra, a coffee table tome from local celebrity chef Georges Perrier and a copy of the The Frog Commissary Cookbook (the Frog and the Commissary had been a pair of innovative Philly restaurants in the ’70s and ’80s that my grandmother had loved).

I found that I never had much use for those first two volumes, but Frog Commissary rapidly became my cooking primer. I turned to it at least once a week for guidance on soups, salads, muffins and desserts. I was most drawn to the 15 pages of vinaigrettes and dressings because the recipes were written clearly and gave me nearly endless options for improving my salads. I learned how to make a basic vinaigrette and how to enhance it with herbs, spices and aromatics. Eleven years later, the things I absorbed from that book stay with me.

Before you start prepping, read these tips

Macaroon vs. Macaron: Two Very Different Cookies With a Linked Past

by in Recipes, May 31st, 2013

macaroonsWhen you think of macaroons, do you recall those sweet lumps of shredded coconut with a golden crust? Or do you think of those vibrantly colored airy meringue sandwiches that the French refer to as macarons? Though these cookies share similar names, they look and taste different; they do, however, share a similar past.

If you’ve found yourself scratching your head at the bakery counter not knowing which to buy, or which is which, you’re not alone. In honor of National Macaroon Day, which is today, May 30, FN Dish is demystifying the history of these sweet, enticing confections. Read on to learn more about these cookies and get some great recipes to celebrate this food holiday with.

What makes a macaroon, plus recipes to try

In Season: Red Globe Radishes

by , May 31st, 2013

radish

What They Are and When to Enjoy:
Radishes belong to the cruciferous vegetable family which takes its name from the Latin root crux, meaning cross. But rest assured, eating them is no cross to bear! They are deliciously crisp and fresh tasting with a...

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What to Watch: Celebration Dinners, Guy Cooks With Dean McDermott and Sunday Night Competition

by in Shows, May 31st, 2013

Guy and DeanThis weekend on Food Network, it’s all about celebrating with the people you love, whether it’s with friends, family members or those who put their lives on the line to make a difference.

On Saturday, Ree is cooking up a dinner to welcome friends who are moving back to town. Then Trisha’s cooking a graduation picnic for her niece and nephew. On Giada at Home, Giada’s offering up a taste of barbecue throughout the nation. Then on Sunday, Jamie Deen is cooking a meal for his firefighter friends. And afterward, Guy gets in the kitchen with his Team Guy champion from Rachael vs. Guy: Celebrity Cook-Off, Dean McDermott. Then on Sandwich King, Jeff cooks up a number of different burgers with his son, Lorenzo, by his side.

On Sunday night, take your seats for a special night of competition. First it’s an episode of Chopped that challenges the contestants to fry up something in each of their dishes. Then it’s the season premiere of Food Network Star with Giada, Alton and Bobby mentoring 12 hopefuls who are competing to win the coveted TV dream job. And last, it’s the finale of Iron Chef America Tournament of Champions with Iron Chef Symon vs. Iron Chef Garces.

Read about the shows

Cookbooks for the Graduating Class and Other Kitchen Freshman

by in Books, May 30th, 2013

Cookbooks for the Graduating Class and BeginnersCookbooks are not the first place one turns to for humor. Funny cookbooks do exist: Peg Bracken’s classic The I Hate to Cook Book (1960) is one; Amy Sedaris’ more recent — and terrific — I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence (2006) is another. But most cookbooks assume people can’t handle too much humor with their how-to. Fair enough.

Cookbooks for rank beginners, however, make up a well-established subgenre that plays by its own set of rules. Rule #1: Keep ‘em laughing. Cookbooks for novices specialize in a very specific form of comic hyperbole, playing up the presumed ignorance of their target reader (usually a recent graduate or a bachelor) who is posited as either starving or idiotic, or both a hapless sloven who has just barely mastered the arts of chewing and swallowing. These books are easy to recognize by their titles: The Bachelor’s Guide to Ward Off Starvation, Help! My Apartment Has a Kitchen, and my personal favorite, Your Shirt Is Not an Oven Mitt! (All three, I’m proud to say, have a home in the Food Network Library.)

Get Jonathan’s recommendations

Get the Look: Sunny Anderson’s Kitchen

by in Food Network Chef, Food Network Magazine, May 30th, 2013

sunny anderson's kitchen

Pick up some of Sunny’s finds for your own kitchen.

Monstera Leaf Garden Towels
Because she has several cats who like to paw at the curtains, Sunny made hers out of this extra-sturdy barkcloth fabric, in the Monstera Leaf Garden pattern. $17 per yard; islandshawaiianfabric.com

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