Frozen Peanut Butter Bites — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, June 22nd, 2014

Frozen Peanut Butter Bites  — Most Popular Pin of the WeekFor a frozen summer treat that isn’t ice-cream or frozen yogurt, try these no-cook Frozen Peanut Butter Bites by Patrick and Gina Neely. By adding vanilla extract, chocolate and sugar to creamy peanut butter, the result is a velvety and crunchy dessert in minutes. No wonder this recipe is this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week.

For more outdoor summer recipes, check out Food Network’s Let’s Grill board on Pinterest.

Get the recipe: Frozen Peanut Butter Bites

7 Ways to Amp Up Grilled Chicken

by in Uncategorized, June 22nd, 2014

grilled chicken with green pea sauce
Poor grilled chicken. Often considered bland and dry, the lean, good-for-you protein gets a bad rap. But these versions — abounding in herbs, spices and other flavor-forward add-ins — ensure that everyone’s summer staple is truly g...

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Slushies for Grownups

by in Drinks, June 21st, 2014

Slushies for Grownups (Recipes)There’s no reason kids should have all the fun when it comes to slushies. They’re simple to make and they do a nice job of cooling you off during the hottest months of the year, so what’s not to love? While these options include alcohol, they can easily be made family-friendly with a bit of simple syrup or fruit juice. Either way, FN Dish is convinced that after a few sips of one of these guys, you’ll be bidding farewell to punch and beer this summer.

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What to Do with Rotisserie Chicken

by in Recipes, June 21st, 2014

Pulled BBQ Chicken SandwichesThe Kitchen co-hosts, plus a few of their special guests, showed off a next-level contraption that roasts chicken fireside, a la rotisserie chicken, on this morning’s all-new episode. The setup included a central fire pit and multiple hanging birds around the heat, which roasted slowly and became moist and juicy. If you don’t happen to have the tools and space to recreate the scene in your backyard, there’s no shame in picking up a warm rotisserie chicken from the supermarket and putting it to work in quick-fix meals at home. Easy to find and economical, store-bought rotisserie chicken is a weeknight timesaver and perhaps the ultimate shortcut ingredient, as it can be used in countless lunch and dinner recipes. Check out a few of Food Network’s favorite ideas below, then see all of the recipes featured on The Kitchen today.

Once you make a sweet, tangy barbecue sauce, these surprisingly healthy Pulled BBQ Chicken Sandwiches (pictured above) become as simple to make as shredding the meat and assembling. Be sure to not go overboard when adding the liquid smoke; a few drops will go a long way in adding the beloved smoky flavor.

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Taste Test: Healthier Crackers

by in Uncategorized, June 21st, 2014

crackers
Have you  browsed the cracker aisle lately? In addition to stocking the classic varieties, shelves are overflowing with versions made from whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds. But are these options really what they’re cracked up to be?

The ...

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Grilled Apple Cider Chicken — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, June 20th, 2014

I actually put together my very first grill myself. It took all day and a good deal of patience and persistence. It was a pretty scary moment when I twisted the control on the tank and clicked the ignition. It all worked out and I didn’t blow myself to kingdom come. I love to grill throughout the year, but in the summer it’s just practical to keep the heat out of the kitchen. Burgers and brats are brilliant, and steaks and seafood are stupendous, but my absolute favorite is cheap and cheerful chicken. Read more

My Paris Kitchen — Off the Shelf

by in Books, June 20th, 2014

My Paris Kitchen CookbookThe delightful thing about David Lebovitz’s writing is his ability to make even the most-intimidating foreign cuisine seem approachable and familiar. French cuisine can be overwhelming, especially for home cooks. It’s renowned for its heritage of precision, its delicate balance of flavors and its unwavering high standards for taste and presentation. That’s great for a major holiday dinner, but who has time for fussy food in the middle of the week?

My Paris Kitchen took me by surprise with how unpretentious and inviting its recipes are. Crack open the book to any page and it’s not hard to imagine David taking you calmly by the elbow and strolling you down a Parisian street and into his favorite cheese shop, where you discover how fascinating (and delicious!) seasonal cheeses can be. His style of writing is relaxed, conversational and friendly. You’re just hanging out with a friend, chatting about adding ice to wine, the virtues of a good mortar and pestle, and the miracle that is a perfectly ripe cherry tomato.

The other little something special that sets My Paris Kitchen apart is the fact that some recipes are basic and other recipes will gently guide you outside your culinary comfort zone. David’s inviting writing is almost misleading, in that you’ll be halfway through a recipe you once thought to be way beyond your skill level before you realize how simple French cooking can be if you have the right teacher. And that’s the mark of an exceptional cookbook: It doesn’t just give you better recipes; it helps you become a better cook.

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NFL Players Show Off Big Appetites — for Practical Jokes

by in News, June 20th, 2014

NFL Players Show Off Big AppetitesNFL players have been known to live large and splash out some serious cash on food and drink, especially thanks to a questionable hazing tradition wherein veteran players stick team newbies with whopping dinner tabs.

For example, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant recently told Fox Sports he was forced to fork over $55,000 for dinner with teammates at Pappas Bros. Steakhouse in Texas during his rookie year. Despite the fact that Dez, a first-round pick in 2010, had signed a five-year deal worth $11.8 million, the pressure to pay for his fellow players’ excesses rubbed him the wrong way.

Earlier this month, Philadelphia Eagles offensive tackle Lane Johnson, who was a first-round draft pick in 2013, tweeted a dinner bill from Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House in Philadelphia with the caption “Rookie dinner.” The total damage indicated on that check was a modest-only-by-comparison $17,747 — much of it apparently on Remy Martin Louis XIII cognac ($4,525) and more than a few extremely pricey bottles of Cabernet (one bottle of 2005 Screaming Eagle Cabernet cost $3,495 alone), as well as steaks, seafood and sides. (The “auto gratuity” was calculated at $472.20 — but perhaps the players left some extra cash?)

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