This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Uncategorized, March 13th, 2014

green veggies

In this week’s news: time-warping with sprouted grains and hemp brownies; tracking down the four-leaf clover of kale; and betting the farm on farm-to-table real estate.

Sprouted Grains Hit the Big Time
Boomers might cop an eye roll when they h...

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Chopped Viewers’ Choice: Fans Choose the Chopped Mystery Basket Ingredients

by in Shows, March 13th, 2014
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Chopped basketChopped fans, here’s your chance to be a part of the competition. You’ll be able to choose the basket ingredients for unsuspecting chef-competitors for an upcoming episode. Food Network is giving you the opportunity to assemble the ingredients that make it into all three of the mystery baskets. It’s a special viewers’-choice episode that will take the competitors by surprise.

Find Out How to Participate

10 Potato Picks — Comfort Food Feast

by in Recipes, March 13th, 2014

roasted potatoesWould a burger be complete without crispy, salty fries dunked in ketchup? Would your mother’s meatloaf hit the same spot without buttery mashed potatoes? How about your Sunday brunch? Where would it be without a heaping plate of hash browns? Solid potato recipes are the most dog-eared pages of your cookbooks and recipe collections for a reason. The versatility of a simple spud is astounding, and every rendering still manages to pin down a familiar homemade flavor. In the name of everything comforting and good, this week is all about our favorite tried-and-true potato recipes.

1. French-Fried — What better place to start than America’s favorite? Ree’s Perfect French Fries are blissfully golden and crispy.

2. Oven-Fried — Not down for the deep-fry oil dunk? Stick wedges in the oven for addictive Oven-Fried Potatoes.

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Restaurant Revisited: A Lot to Lose at Tootie’s Texas BBQ

by in Shows, March 12th, 2014

Robert Irvine on Restaurant: Impossible“There’s nothing that says, ‘Welcome to a barbecue place,’” Robert Irvine said after surveying Tootie’s Texas BBQ, but it turned out that what he deemed the “very, very bland” decor was just one of several problems plaguing owner Eileen Smith’s Cathedral City, Calif., restaurant. With unexceptional ‘cue coming out of the kitchen and mediocre management at the helm of the business, Tootie’s was losing nearly $3,000 every week, so Eileen looked to Robert to reinvigorate the eatery as well as herself, after she’d endured a string of personal losses and devastating struggles. With only two days to work and a budget of just $10,000, Robert indeed fulfilled his Restaurant: Impossible mission, reopening Tootie’s with an updated menu and a comfortable, lively interior. Read on below to hear from Eileen in an exclusive interview, and find out how she and her business are doing today.

“Our sales are up 30 percent,” Eileen says, adding, “I know I have a ways to go before I am making a profit, but the gap is closing. I am working my tail off to ensure success.”

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Wait, the Five-Second Rule Is Real?

by in News, March 12th, 2014

The Five-Second RuleYou, like everyone else, have probably always assumed the “five-second rule,” which posits that food dropped on the floor is fine to eat if it gets snatched up right away, is an urban myth. Until now, the studies have backed up your skepticism.

But this week biologists at Aston University, in Birmingham, England, have released the results of a study they say proves the rule actually holds true. The researchers measured the transfer of common bacteria from various floor types (carpet, tile and laminate) onto dropped toast, pasta, cookies and sticky sweets in time periods ranging from 3 to 30 seconds, and they concluded that time was a “significant factor in the transfer of bacteria from a floor surface to a piece of food.” The type of flooring, as well as the moistness of the food, also played a role.

As it turns out, carpeted surfaces were found to be less likely to transmit bacteria onto food, whereas if you splat your spaghetti on your tiled kitchen floor and take your time scraping it back up again — uh — don’t reach for your fork.

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Try a New Twist on Broccoli-Cheese Soup for St. Patrick’s Day

by in Recipes, Shows, March 12th, 2014

Cheddar-Beer SoupFor this week’s Chopped Dinner Challenge, the chefs of Food Network Kitchen chose to feature the basket ingredient broccoli rabe. The goal of this challenge was to find a new use for the leafy green outside of traditional Italian cooking. With that in mind, this recipe for Broccoli Rabe and Cheddar-Beer Soup came about. This classic comfort food gets remade by swapping regular broccoli with broccoli rabe, which lends a spicy and slightly bitter taste to the soup. You might just find yourself loving this new rendition even more than the original — it’s that flavorful.

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Best 5 French Toast Recipes

by in Recipes, March 12th, 2014

French ToastWith a crispy, crunchy crust and a moist, tender center, French toast is a hearty breakfast that’s most often made even more comforting with a hefty drizzle of warm maple syrup. While the classic recipe requires little more than bread, eggs, and a splash of milk or cream, there are seemingly endless ways to dress up this timeless favorite, including using specialty bread or baking the toast into a big-batch casserole. Check out Food Network’s top-five French toast recipes below to find a mix of traditional and creative renditions from Guy, Ina, The Pioneer Woman and more Food Network chefs.

5. Texas French Toast Bananas Foster — Using the decadent dessert of bananas Foster as his inspiration, Guy dunks thick-cut Texas toast into a sweet, creamy mixture of rum, cinnamon and orange juice, then tops the griddled bread with caramel-coated bananas.

4. Chocolate Hazelnut Stuffed French Toast — Sandwiched between two slices of buttered French toast, the chocolate-hazelnut spread becomes warm and deliciously gooey.

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Don’t Waste Those Tops: Eat More Greens

by in Recipes, March 12th, 2014

Don't Waste Those Tops: Eat More GreensMy goal is to repurpose pretty much everything in the kitchen to cut down on waste. With each new recipe, I create a quilt, of sorts, weaving unused ingredients, or leftover portions, from one dish into the next new recipe I develop. When I make bread, the little bit of flour left on the board after kneading and baking gets spooned into a bowl for the next time. A few leftover meatballs might make for a meager meal on their own. Smashed up and simmered in a marinara sauce, though, they’re a hearty dinner over polenta or pasta.

When I buy beets, the tops, also called beet greens, are always set aside for a quick saute. Finding uses for the less-obvious ingredients is something I particularly enjoy. Take carrots, for example. They, too, come with these lush, green leaves attached, which most people snap off and toss in the trash. Thanks to some inspiration from a friend on Instagram a couple of months ago, I decided to make a pesto out of them. This recipe is a great way to enjoy an old favorite in a new way.

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