We’re All Obsessed With Pink Right Now: Here’s How to Cook (and Decorate) With It

by in Recipes, March 22nd, 2017

Look around — pink is everywhere right now, and once you notice it, you won’t be able to stop. A quick stroll down a busy street can quickly turn into a parade of delicate pastel shades and even more arresting tones of bubblegum. New York Magazine’s fascinating dive into the color proves it’s true: Pink is in our clothes, our restaurants, our homes and our pop culture. But it’s not just any old pink; it’s millennial pink, a light, soft shade that includes variations on salmon, cotton candy, flamingo, Champagne and more. It’s so prevalent today that it’s named for the generation that’s obsessed with Instagramming it.

With countless storefront displays, websites and products awash in the playful hue, nobody is immune to the craze. Of course, we wanted to get in on the fun, too! Here’s how we imagine millennial pink can take over your kitchens — in both recipes from Food Network and decor ideas from our friends at HGTV.

Birthday Cake with Hot-Pink Butter Icing (pictured at top)
Ina Garten recommends using 14 drops of pink food coloring — no more, no less — to achieve the perfect shade of rose petal when preparing her indulgent pink buttercream.

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Mayonnaise Gets Its Moment at 2 Pop-Up Cafes in Japan

by in News, March 22nd, 2017

Mayonnaise Gets Its Moment at 2 Pop-Up Cafes in JapanPeople tend to have their favorite condiments. Ketchup on everything? Mustard for the win? Hey, whatever floats your boat. Those who are partial to mayonnaise now have bragging rights over this: Japan is erecting two temporary shrines to the creamy-white food topper.

Kewpie mayonnaise, a Japanese mayo with a cultlike following (it even has its own museum), is opening a dedicated pop-up “Kewpie mayo café” first in Tokyo (March 1-31) and then in Nagoya (April 3-30). The cafes will feature “a menu of ‘Mayonnaise Magic’ that improves texture, richness and umami by using mayonnaise” — not only as an ingredient in salads, but also to fry, bake and saute foods — according to a press release (translation from Japanese via Google Translate).

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9 Slam-Dunk Snack Recipes for March Madness

by in Recipes, View All Posts, March 22nd, 2017

Buffalo Chicken Cheese BallsThis week marks the race to the Elite Eight for 16 college basketball teams. After some upsets in the first two rounds, you won’t find a single perfect bracket, according to NCAA.com. So now that your perfect record is no more, it’s time to focus on the important things — like what you’ll be snacking on for the rest of the tournament. We found 10 basketball-shaped snacks to roll out at your next watch party.

Buffalo Chicken Cheese Balls (above)

It wouldn’t be a watch party without a buffalo-chicken dish. If your favorite buffalo chicken tenders married your cheese plate, these deep-fried chicken and cheese balls are what you’d get. They’re crispy on the outside and hot and cheesy on the inside. Dipped in a tangy blue cheese sauce, you’ll have to go back for seconds and thirds.

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The Journey to the Gauntlet: Chatting with Challenger Stephanie Izard from Iron Chef Gauntlet

by in Shows, March 22nd, 2017

Iron Chef GauntletThis. Is. It. The fight to become an Iron Chef is unlike any other culinary competition, with the demands for precision, expertise, intuition and downright excellence the most rigorous in the business. On Iron Chef Gauntlet, seven of the country’s most-elite chefs will come together to prove that their skills are the sharpest — but ultimately just one will earn the right to the run the gauntlet for the chance to join the ranks of the great Iron Chefs.

Before the competition begins on Sunday, April 16 at 9|8c, we’re giving you, Iron Chef fans, the first introductions to the crop of challengers ready to do battle. Today we’d like you to meet Stephanie Izard, a chef from Chicago. Read on below to get to know her style in the kitchen, and be sure to come back to FN Dish all week long as we present a new contender every day this week.

What’s your style of cuisine, and do you have a signature dish?
Stephanie Izard: I wouldn’t say I have a signature dish, because I just make a lot of different things and I think my favorites kind of change, but I like to cook foods from all over the world and just keep trying to learn more and more about different flavors. So a lot of focus on Asian cuisines, I would say, whether it’s Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Chinese. But I try to dabble in some other areas too.

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Why Are No-Alcohol Wines All the Buzz?

by in Drinks, News, March 21st, 2017

Why Are No-Alcohol Wines All the Buzz?Wines with no or low alcohol content may sound, to buzz-loving oenophiles, like a day without sunshine, but (trend watch?) the New York Daily News has declared them to be “a thing.”

The paper relays that NA wine sales in the year ending January 28, 2017 have been a “robust” $99 million annually, according to Nielsen data, yet it notes that sales the year prior were actually 5.4 percent higher.

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Your Guide to Utilizing Spring Produce

by in In Season, Recipes, March 21st, 2017

Pasta PrimaveraBeautiful cherry blossoms are not the only thing coming into full bloom this spring — plenty of vegetables are entering their prime season as well. And while snacking on vegetables in their au naturale state is always delicious, these recipes take them to a whole new level. So the next time you are in the produce section at the grocery store, grab some rhubarb, asparagus, carrots or peas, and try one of these 11 spring recipes.

Pasta Primavera (pictured above)
Primavera means “spring” in Italian, and there’s no shortage of seasonal flavors going on here, thanks to the addition of snap peas, carrots and bell pepper.

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The Journey to the Gauntlet: Chatting with Challenger Shota Nakajima from Iron Chef Gauntlet

by in Shows, March 21st, 2017

Iron Chef GauntletThis. Is. It. The fight to become an Iron Chef is unlike any other culinary competition, with the demands for precision, expertise, intuition and downright excellence the most rigorous in the business. On Iron Chef Gauntlet, seven of the country’s most-elite chefs will come together to prove that their skills are the sharpest — but ultimately just one will earn the right to the run the gauntlet for the chance to join the ranks of the great Iron Chefs.

Before the competition begins on Sunday, April 16 at 9|8c, we’re giving you, Iron Chef fans, the first introductions to the crop of challengers ready to do battle. Today we’d like you to meet Shota Nakajima, a chef from Seattle. Read on below to get to know his style in the kitchen, and be sure to come back to FN Dish all week long as we present a new contender every day this week.

What’s your style of cuisine, and do you have a signature dish?
Shota Nakajima: My style of cuisine is Japanese cuisine. Old-school Japanese cuisine. Not a lot of powder, not a lot of the new-age stuff. Old-school, old-school.

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11 Fresh Takes on Spring Recipes from Bobby

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, March 20th, 2017

Quinoa Salad with Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Black OlivesWhile recent snowstorms and confusing weather patterns across the county might have you revisiting your winter wardrobe, the truth is that spring is officially here. It’s time to move away from soups and stews and venture into all the fresh produce this season has to offer. In celebration of spring, we’ve rounded up some of Bobby Flay’s best recipes that will have you craving the flavors of the season.

Quinoa Salad with Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Black Olives (pictured above)
As pasta salad season approaches, think outside of the box by using quinoa instead of the usual noodles. Follow Bobby’s lead and boil the quinoa with fresh thyme to infuse it with flavor as it cooks.

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The Journey to the Gauntlet: Chatting with Challenger Sarah Grueneberg from Iron Chef Gauntlet

by in Shows, March 20th, 2017

Iron Chef GauntletThis. Is. It. The fight to become an Iron Chef is unlike any other culinary competition, with the demands for precision, expertise, intuition and downright excellence the most rigorous in the business. On Iron Chef Gauntlet, seven of the country’s most-elite chefs will come together to prove that their skills are the sharpest — but ultimately just one will earn the right to the run the gauntlet for the chance to join the ranks of the great Iron Chefs.

Before the competition begins on Sunday, April 16 at 9|8c, we’re giving you, Iron Chef fans, the first introductions to the crop of challengers ready to do battle. Today we’d like you to meet Sarah Grueneberg, a chef from Chicago. Read on below to get to know her style in the kitchen, and be sure to come back to FN Dish all week long as we present a new contender every day this week.

What’s your style of cuisine, and do you have a signature dish?
Sarah Grueneberg: My style of cuisine is Italian, pasta focused. Signature dish would be something with pasta. But what everyone knows me for in Chicago is called Ragu alla Napoletana, and it’s like an Italian grandmother cooked it. It’s the big Sunday sauce, but it’s in a big bowl and it has a big pork shank, housemade meatballs, sausage and then we make a pasta with all the sauce and the meat. And it takes four days to make, and it’s like a big bowl of love basically.

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Ticket to Dine: Why This Chef ‘Uberized’ His Michelin-Starred Restaurant

by in Restaurants, March 20th, 2017

Would you eat at a restaurant if you had to foot the entire bill in advance?

Turns out it’s not that wild of a concept. More and more Michelin-starred restaurants like Eleven Madison Park in New York and Alinea and Acadia in Chicago are converting to a ticketing system where diners reserve their tables by paying for the entire meal weeks, sometimes months, ahead of the booking — even the waiter’s tip.

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