Cutthroat Kitchen Host Alton Recaps the Superstar Sabotage Tournament

by in Recipes, Shows, November 6th, 2014

Alton BrownIn true tournament fashion, the final moments were some of the most anticipated in Cutthroat Kitchen‘s first-ever installment of Superstar Sabotage. Over the course of four weeks, 16 of your favorite A-list culinary masters took their places in the Cutthroat arena for no-holds-barred competition, subjecting themselves to sabotage upon sabotage all in the name of charity. But last night, the final four rivals — Chefs Aarti Sequeira, Eric Greenspan, Fabio Viviani and Marcel Vigneron — went to battle in the last heat, and as fans might have expected, host Alton Brown saved some of his shock-and-awe flashes until the very end. Read on below to hear from Alton as he looks back at a most-memorable finale.

For the first time ever, you doubled chefs’ bank accounts and gifted them a total of $50,000 to spend during the finale. Is that allowance a blessing or a curse, and do you think that allowance changed the course of play?
Alton Brown: It’s only a blessing or a curse if you’re on the receiving end of it at the end of the day. For whatever charity gets the money, then it can be a huge blessing. But really, in the kitchen environment, it’s kind of play money in a way. It almost doesn’t matter. It could be millions and it wouldn’t matter.

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“Competition Smarts” — Alton’s After-Show

by in Shows, November 5th, 2014

Not just a competition, Cutthroat Kitchen is a game, and to win, chefs must be able to not only outcook their contestants but also outthink them, both during auction and in the midst of their food prep. During tonight’s finale heat of Superstar Sabotage, Chef Marcel Vigneron proved just how useful it is to be a savvy contestant — one that can anticipate the judging process and use it to his advantage.

In Round 1′s meatball challenge, Marcel was forced to make the star of his dish with either canned soup or canned ham, and he opted for the ham, a seemingly doozy of an ingredient but perhaps ultimately his saving grace. “It freaking tastes good,” host Alton Brown revealed on his After-Show. “It’s salty, so it’s got those spices.” Judge Simon Majumdar agreed, explaining that while the salt of such a canned product has the potential to be overwhelming, Marcel used the “competition smarts” to use that flavor to his benefit. “He knew that I was only going to take a taste, mix it with the other things on the plate and then make my decision based on that,” Simon said. “It’s not like I was going to chow down on the whole big meatball.”

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Camouflage Ice Cream: Now You See It, Now You Don’t

by in News, November 5th, 2014

First Class Camouflage Layered Sundae and First Class Camouflage Ice CreamIt’s pretty easy to make a scoop of ice cream on a waffle cone disappear. (Slurp!) But to make it disappear before you eat it? Well, that takes a little more effort. Baskin-Robbins is apparently up for the challenge.

Just in time for Veterans Day, the ice cream specialty chain is introducing camouflage ice cream as the November flavor of the month, as well as a matching camouflage waffle cone and bowl and a layered sundae.

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Curtis Stone

by in Food Network Chef, Shows, November 5th, 2014

Curtis StoneYou likely saw him compete on Iron Chef America, perhaps made his recipe for his best-ever breakfast dish and surely watched him judge the finale battle on Rachael vs. Guy: Kids Cook-Off. And now, beginning tonight, you can catch Curtis Stone on the all-new series Kitchen Inferno (airing tonight at 10|9c) as he oversees fiery battles between chefs in the ultimate game of risk and reward. Just in time for Kitchen Inferno’s series premiere, Curtis stopped by Food Network’s Facebook page to chat with his fans, answer their questions about the show and reveal little-know tidbits about himself. Read on below to see highlights from the chat and learn 10 facts about the Kitchen Inferno host, including his least-favorite food, his most-craved holiday treat and the go-to ingredients he keeps in the refrigerator.

1. Curtis’ top pick for supper? “It would be something that reminds me of my childhood, like roast pork with cracklings,” he says. “I still make it a lot at home.”

2. His least-favorite food is licorice.

3. Curtis owns a tasting-menu-based restaurant in California. “My favorite food trend is the trend of tasting menus because I think it’s a beautiful way to eat. You put yourself in the hands of the chefs and their ability to cook for you,” he explains.

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Hump Day Snack: Bacon-Crusted Beer Mac and Cheese

by , November 5th, 2014

Bacon Mac + CheeseThe air is brisk, the leaves are changing and football season is in full swing. With college and professional games on TV almost every night of the week, why not bring the spirit of tipsy tailgates into your kitchen? This recipe for Bacon-Crusted Beer Mac and Cheese combines the irresistible ooey-gooeyness of cheese with a two football favorites — beer and bacon — for a hearty, winning combination. Throw in a generous glug of your favorite brew into classic bechamel to add an extra layer of flavor. Combine the cheesy concoction with elbow pasta, then top with a salty combo of bacon, Parmesan and panko bread crumbs for a smoky, crunchy finish. The finished dish will certainly score a touchdown with your friends and family, any day of the week.

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Best 5 Thanksgiving Appetizers

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 5th, 2014

While you want your Thanksgiving dinner guests to have something to munch on when they arrive at your house, you don’t want them to fill up on snacks and ultimately be too full to enjoy the feast. So, when it comes to dishing out appetizers on turkey day, less is more; think small bites of crunchy nuts, a simple soup or a creamy cheese. These fuss-free starters will satisfy the crowd and leave them craving the main event, but — as a bonus for you, the host or hostess — most are quick to prepare. Read on below for Food Network’s top-five Thanksgiving appetizer recipes to find ideas fit for the feast, then check out Thanksgiving Central for more appetizer inspiration.

5. Devilish Eggs — Ready to eat in less than 25 minutes, these classic deviled eggs are lightened up with the help of tofu, which stretches the traditionally indulgent mustard-laced yolk filling.

4. Hot Spinach and Artichoke Dip — Follow Alton Brown’s lead and save time in the kitchen by starting with frozen spinach and frozen artichokes to make his quick-fix dip. He mixes tangy sour cream with cream cheese, plus a dollop of mayonnaise and a pinch of garlic powder, for over-the-top richness.

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Great Healthy No-Added-Sugar Breakfasts

by , November 5th, 2014

Healthy Breakfast BurritosHalloween may be behind us, but we’d bet that lots of people are having all-candy breakfasts this week. The occasional candy bar aside, there are definite health issues with an all-sugar diet. One way to keep total intake in check is to cut it out where you don’t need it, so that you can leave room for when you really want a treat. A great place to start is breakfast, which (candy aside) is often an unnecessarily sweet meal. Here are 15 breakfasts that show you how to start your day without sugar.

Multigrain toast topped with…

  • Avocado and red pepper flakes
  • Avocados, sliced red onions and tomatoes, drizzled with balsamic vinegar and fresh basil
  • Cashew butter, apple slices and toasted coconut flakes
  • Cream cheese and smoked salmon
  • Olive oil, tomatoes, feta cheese and toasted walnuts

(Note: Most sliced breads have some sort of added sugar. Make sure to scan the ingredient list or buy a loaf from your local bakery.)

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Your Buttery Thanksgiving: What You Need to Know

by in Holidays, November 5th, 2014

Butter is back — though depending on whom you ask, it never went away — and there’s no better time to celebrate it than on one of the most butter-friendly holidays of the year.

We’re starting to see more and more varieties of butter in stores — not just the regular salted and unsalted sticks, but local butters, grass-fed butters, cultured (sometimes called European-style) butters and even goat butters. Here’s what you need to know for your butteriest Thanksgiving yet.

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