Best Tomato Soup Ever — Most Popular Pin of the Week

by in Community, August 17th, 2014

Best Tomato Soup EverFor an easy weeknight meal, soup is your best bet. It is also extremely versatile and can be made with any number of ingredients, depending on your mood. For a warming and comforting treat that’s as perfect for summer as it is for winter, look no further than Ree Drummond‘s Best Tomato Soup Ever. The heavy cream, sherry and sugar give the recipe a pop of flavor and balance the acidity of the tomatoes. This relaxing recipe is the ideal pick for this week’s Most Popular Pin of the Week.

For more feel-good recipes, check out Food Network’s Let’s Cook Comfort Food board on Pinterest.

Get the recipe: Best Tomato Soup Ever

In the Kitchen with Little Chefs: Recipes to Make with Kids

by in Recipes, August 16th, 2014

Parmigiano and Herb Chicken BreastWhile hectic weeknight schedules might make it difficult to embrace cooking with your kids on Monday through Friday, lazy weekends — especially in the summer — are often an ideal time to let little ones try their hands in the kitchen. This morning on an all-new episode of The Kitchen, the co-hosts celebrated young chefs and introduced a series of must-try bites that kids of all ages would be eager to both assemble and enjoy. Just in time for the last few weeks of summer, FN Dish has rounded up even more kid-friendly eats and drinks to help parents make the most of this fleeting carefree season. Read on below to find savory and sweet picks to try out with your kids at home.

It’s no secret that kids have a penchant for chicken fingers, and in her recipe for Parmigiano and Herb Chicken Breast Tenders (pictured above), Rachael dresses up the kid-approved classic in a flash. Ready to eat in only 35 minutes, her chicken dinner features chicken breasts dunked in a mixture of crunchy panko breadcrumbs and nutty Parmesan cheese, which helps achieve a crispy coating on the outside. Round out the plate with spaghetti topped with a tomato-garlic sauce to complete the meal.

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Frozen Friday: Iced Coffee

by , August 15th, 2014

We’re in for a long, hot summer. So to stave off heat stroke, we’re bringing you our favorite summer treats each week as part of Frozen Friday, giving you the scoop on our favorite ice-cold recipes and party ideas to help you stay cool all summer long.

Over half of all Americans over age 18 drink coffee every day and 30 million of those consumers drink specialty lattes and mochas. Clearly we all know how to live drink it up. We also like to keep things fresh, especially on long summer days. Before your next coffee break, we’ve sought out some of the most creative and tasty iced caffeine kicks to keep you satisfied and energized while the sun is high.

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Beat the Wheat: Gluten-Free Peach Pie

by , August 15th, 2014

Peach PieAKA Everything’s Just Peachy

This is the very first pie I made after being diagnosed with celiac disease. It’s fruity and sweet, but ginger and a bit of cracked black pepper give it the tiniest of kicks.

I grew up eating fruit pies my uncle made in his bakery, or that my mom made at home. We were the kind of family that had dessert every night after dinner, and all summer long it was pie after pie after pie. Peach pie was my favorite, followed closely by sour cherry.

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Whole Roast Chicken with Lemon and Herbs — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, August 15th, 2014

Whole Roast Chicken with Lemon and HerbsA rotisserie chicken picked up on the way home from work in a mad dash into the grocery store spells convenience. It’s dinner on the table in a hurry. You can even get all-organic chickens with all-natural ingredients in some better markets. It’s good stuff. However, a home-cooked Whole Roast Chicken with Lemon and Herbs spells real down-home comfort. For all practical purposes, they are the same dish, same bird, same concept, but face it — it’s just not really the same thing. A bird in a bag is a heck of a lot better than a fast-food burger and fries, but it’s like comparing the proverbial apples and oranges — both fruit and round, but that’s about it.

There is little more that satisfies me personally than roast chicken. I love the mouthwatering aroma that fills the house, the sound of the sizzle of the juices in the pan when you open the door to baste the meat, the crackle of the golden-brown skin when the bird is carved. When I go to a world-class restaurant and I really want to see what the chef can do, I don’t order the sous vide signature dish christened with foam or the fancy-pants dish studded with truffles; I order simple, humble roast chicken.

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Could You Pick Your Favorite Beer Out of a Lineup?

by in News, August 15th, 2014

Could You Pick Your Favorite Beer Out of a Lineup?Are you particular about your beer? Loyal to a specific lager? Convinced your fave brand of beer is better than the other bottles or cans crowding the cooler? Many of us are. But do you think you could pick your preferred beer out of a lineup?

No problem, right? Don’t be so sure. A recent study showed that, in blind taste tests, consumers actually have a hard time telling apart different brands of European pale lager, the most-commonly consumed style of beer around the world.

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The Soda Fountain — Off the Shelf

by in Books, August 15th, 2014

The Soda Fountain CookbookOpening The Soda Fountain by Gia Giasullo and Peter Freeman is like taking a step back in American culinary history. The book takes you on a fascinating tour of the American soda fountain, a traditional establishment that has roots far deeper than a lot of the cola drinkers and ice cream lovers of today realize. It hits the mark of being “a slice of history with a double scoop of how-to.”

The Soda Fountain is divided into two primary sections, Stories and Recipes. The Stories chapters take you through the evolution of the soda fountain as an American culinary institution, from its first days as a pharmacy staple (yes, you read that right) through its Golden Age and into the Great Depression, right on to its second coming in small shops around the country. The stories are fun and charming, featuring tales of jazz and Prohibition. You get the sense as you flip through the pages that Giasullo and Freeman love and respect American food history as much as they appreciate a well-made ice cream float.

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