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Chicken Enchiladas With Roasted Tomatillo Chile Salsa — The Weekender

by in View All Posts, May 3rd, 2013

Chicken Enchiladas With Roasted Tomatillo Chile Salsa

My husband and I have some friends who have an annual cookout on the first Saturday in May. They call it their Cinco de Mayo party, though it only occasionally falls on the fifth of May. Still, there’s always a bounty of chips, guacamole, carne asada and other appropriately celebratory foods.

It’s always a challenge to come up with something to bring that will please a number of palates, will transport well (they live about an hour away) and is in keeping with the theme of the day. In past years, I’ve brought hand-chopped coleslaw with a cumin dressing, a vat of homemade pico de gallo and jars of my favorite roasted corn salsa. All good options, but this year I was ready to up my game a little.

I’ve been thinking that enchiladas would be a good way to go, but I didn’t have a recipe I really loved. Happily, there was a wealth of recipes to be found in the Food Network archives. I settled on Tyler Florence’s Chicken Enchiladas With Roasted Tomatillo Chile Salsa. I find that chicken is nearly always a crowd-pleaser, and I liked the idea of making the sauce from scratch.

These enchiladas are definitely a multi-step process, but they’re easy to make once you get an assembly line of sorts established on your kitchen counter (they go even faster if you enlist help). The finished product is an enchilada that is tangy, cheesy and pleasantly spicy. They are just the thing for your Cinco de Mayo Weekender!

Before you start cooking, read these tips

Hot Spots: Three Unique American Chilis

by in Food Network Magazine, View All Posts, January 16th, 2013

Texas Bowl of RedWarm up with three regional chilis and see why each has a cult following. The experts share their recipes with Food Network Magazine.

In Texas, chili is practically a religion, with one important tenet: Keep it simple. That means no beans and, often, no tomatoes — just beef and spices. “Texas red,” as the locals call it, gets its distinctive dark red color from a big shot of chili powder (a mix of spices that usually includes paprika, cumin and cayenne). Texans cook it low and slow, just like their barbecue, until the chili gets thick and the meat is super tender. Texas Chili Parlor in Austin serves one of the most well-known versions: The Austin American-Statesman called it “legendary,” and owner Scott Zublin says his customers put away up to 250 gallons every week. You can order it mild, hot or extra-hot; the recipe Zublin gave us makes a moderately spicy chili. To turn the heat up or down, just adjust the amount of chili powder. 1409 Lavaca St.; txchiliparlor.com

Try the recipe: Texas Bowl of Red (pictured above)

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Sponsored Post: The Ai Food Truck Stems Out

by in View All Posts, October 17th, 2012

ai food truck
From Our Sponsor: The International Culinary Schools at The Art Institutes

The International Culinary Schools at The Art Institutes’ Ai Food Truck recently finished a month-long food truck tour across Southern California, visiting Art Institutes’ campuses in Inland Empire, Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego. Throughout the tour stops, The Art Institutes’ culinary students challenged local food truck heavyweights to no-holds-barred battles, taking three out of four challenges.

In addition to the on-site food truck competitions, Jesse Brockman, a 2009 graduate from The Art Institute of California (Orange County) with an Associate of Science in culinary arts and winner of season two of The Great Food Truck Race (from The Lime Truck), showed off his culinary chops with exciting food demonstrations. One dish in particular won over attendees in each market.

To eliminate waste and capitalize on some extra zest, Jesse showed audiences how to whip up the delicious edamame hummus by utilizing the extra flavor from the stems of fresh green herbs or vegetables that are typically disposed of. It’s extremely easy to do at home.

Get the recipe for Edamame Hummus

On the Road: Clevelanders Know How to Eat

by in View All Posts, September 25th, 2012

on the road cleveland
Cleveland’s a melting pot of various culinary traditions, and as the final three teams of The Great Food Truck Race cruised into town, so was the diversity of food the trucks dished out. Starting with a Truck Stop challenge of cooking with homegrown, ripe Ohio tomatoes, it was important that each team catered to their surroundings. The best example of this was Pop-A-Waffle taking advantage of their Truck Stop win:  They catered to Cleveland’s large Polish population by offering a “Polish Boy,” which includes “kielbasa, French fries, coleslaw and hot sauce.”

For the next couple of weeks, we’re following the Food Trucks city by city with our guide of the best eats, compiled by the On the Road app and website. Today we’re exploring the best that Cleveland has to offer.

Lola Bistro
Michael Symon’s Lola just might be the crown jewel of Cleveland’s culinary scene. The menu gives diners a modern spin on their favorite dishes (smoked pork chop with chiles and cheesy polenta, anyone?), while always showcasing the best of what local purveyors are producing closeby.

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Scenes From the 2012 James Beard Awards

by in Events, View All Posts, May 8th, 2012

On Monday night the food industry celebrated the best of the best from the past year at the 2012 James Beard Awards at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City. Often referred to as the Oscars of food, the evening honored both well-known chefs (the James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award was given to Wolfgang Puck) and up-and-coming stars (Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar in New York won Rising Star Chef of the Year). Get the full list of winners here and check out our photos from the red carpet below.

James Beard Awards, Ted Allen

James Beard Award-winner and Chopped host Ted Allen snapped his own photos.

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