All Posts In Recipes

Wonton Skins — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in Recipes, November 4th, 2011

spicy pork dumplings
There’s nothing wrong with showing a bit of skin. Especially if it’s steamy.

Because while they may appear a rather mundane ingredient, wonton skins are an inexpensive and easy way to jazz up your cooking. And with the demands of holiday cooking barreling down upon us, anything that produces snazzy and simple company-worthy treats is worth taking notice of.

So let’s start with the basics. Wonton skins (also called wonton wrappers) are thin sheets of dough made from flour, egg and water. That’s basically the same formula as Asian egg noodles, and not all that far off from Italian pasta. Except wonton skins are cut into round and square sheets.

Get the recipe for Steamed Spicy Pork Dumplings »

How to Make the Perfect Pie Crust, Plus Pie Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 4th, 2011


When it comes to Thanksgiving desserts, pies take the cake. But making the perfect pie crust can be daunting, right? Should you use butter, lard or oil — or all three? At what temperature should you keep these ingredients? How should you handle the dough? No need to stress, because we have an easy guide on How to Make Pie Crust and also traditional pie recipes that turn out sweet and flavorful desserts every time.

Fat Talk: Dough built with butter will yield the most flavorful crust, but it’s important to work with very cold butter so as to avoid a gummy finished product. Using shortening is the ultimate way to ensure a flaky consistency, but it is not as naturally tasty as butter, so most recipes that feature lard or shortening will often call for butter as well.

Don’t overwork the dough »

Best 5 Thanksgiving Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 3rd, 2011

southern stuffing
With so many Thanksgiving recipes to choose from, it can be deliciously difficult to pick out the ultimate, tried-and-true ones for this most important of food holidays. We’ve compiled a menu of our five best-ever Thanksgiving recipes, featuring traditional supper staples such as roast turkey and sweet potatoes, so set the table and serve up this classic holiday feast.

5. Traditional Southern Deviled Eggs — Light yet satisfying, these two-bite appetizers won’t fill up your guests before the turkey is carved.

4. Pumpkin Cheesecake — With an easy graham-cracker crust and pumpkin-cream cheese filling laced with ground nutmeg, clove and cinnamon, Paula’s down-home cheesecake is a favorite finish to any Thanksgiving dinner.

Get the top three recipes »

Roasted Cauliflower 5 Ways — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 2nd, 2011

roasted cauliflower
Boost your immune system with vitamin C before cold and flu season sets in by eating more cauliflower. A member of the cabbage family, cauliflower can be boiled, baked or sautéed, but for a well-browned exterior and a flavorful, moist interior, roasting is the way to go.

Start simple with Emeril’s Oven-Roasted Cauliflower With Garlic, Olive Oil and Lemon Juice. We bet even the biggest cauliflower-haters will think twice after sampling this quick yet flavorful dish.

Claire’s Roasted Cauliflower With Dates and Pine Nuts (pictured above) is a wonderful fall side for those willing to experiment with flavor. Roasting the cauliflower makes it slightly sweet and turns into an unexpected complement to the dates.

Try Guy’s Roasted and Pureed Cauliflower as a mashed-potato substitute. With only six ingredients, this side is an easy addition to any weeknight meal.

More recipes from family & friends »

October’s Top 10 Recipes

by in Recipes, November 1st, 2011

october top recipes
Want to know what Food Network fans were cooking in October? From Butternut Squash Soup to cheesy Chicken Enchiladas and sweet pumpkin desserts, here are the top 10 recipes of the month:

10. Tyler’s Chicken Enchiladas
9. Apple Coffee Cake With Brown Sugar Glaze
8. Alton’s Pumpkin Bread
7. Pumpkin Pie
6. Paula’s Chicken and Dumplings

The top 5 recipes of October »

Squash and Pumpkin Soup

by in In Season, Recipes, October 31st, 2011

Fall Squash and Pumpkins
There are so many beautiful (and strange-looking) squash at the market right now. Sure, they’re great for a table centerpiece for Thanksgiving, but why not cook with them as well? Turn acorn, butternut, fairytale (yes, fairytale) and more into a delicious fall soup. Add in some pumpkin and you’re cooking the best of what fall produce has to offer.

Get the recipe »

Scary Spicy Chili — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, October 31st, 2011

vegetarian chili
It won’t be too tough to go meatless today, as your diet will likely consist of just chocolate and candy corn. However, if you want to squeeze in a good-for-you meal in between your sweet indulgences, we have a ghoulishly good meatless menu for you this Halloween.

Robin Miller’s veggie-friendly chili (pictured above) is full of protein-packed beans, fresh bell pepper and heaping spoonfuls of hot sauce, chili powder and pickled jalapeno. Simply combine the ingredients in a slow cooker and let it do all the work, so you can enjoy trick-or-treating and have dinner waiting at home.

Ladle the chili atop mashed potatoes, polenta or rice, or serve along with Gina’s Cheddar and Herb Biscuits, ready in less than 30 minutes.

Get the recipe: Robin’s Vegetarian Chili

Meatless Monday, an international movement, encourages people everywhere to cut meat one day a week for personal and planetary health. Browse more Meatless Monday recipes.

DIY Halloween Candy

by in Holidays, Recipes, October 29th, 2011

caramel puffs
Trick or treat, smell my feet, can I have a homemade sweet to eat? This year, skip the usual store-bought candies and whip up some Halloween classics in your own kitchen. Perfect to pass at a Halloween party or hand out to eager trick-or-treaters, our devilish decadences below are quick to make and feature your favorite sugary flavors.

It takes just four ingredients to make Food Network Magazine’s ghoulishly good Caramel Puffs (pictured above). Dip large marshmallows into creamy caramel, set atop crushed pretzel sticks and drizzle with decadent chocolate sauce. Once dry, put two of these salty-sweet concoctions in a cellophane bag for an easy gift.

Homemade Peppermint Patties and Baby Ruth’s »

Easy Cheese Danish — The Weekender

by in Recipes, October 28th, 2011

cheese danish recipe
As I’ve gotten older, I’ve found that having people over for brunch is my favorite way to entertain. It has none of the frenzy of the weeknight, post-work dinner party and neither does it carry the gravitas (or booze demands) of a Saturday night event. Brunch is low-key, works just as well for families as it does for party-loving single friends, and can be made to taste great no matter what your budget.

What makes brunch so particularly good for entertaining is that the menu options are wide open. Sweet or savory, just about anything under the sun can fit comfortably under its umbrella. It can be as easy as bagels, cream cheese and toppings from the corner bagel shop (no true kitchen effort required on your part at all) to a full-on, home-cooked meal of eggs, bacon, coffee cake and more.

My favorite way to serve brunch consists of a giant skillet of cheesy scrambled eggs, oven-baked turkey breakfast sausage, an easy salad and one baked item that requires a bit more energy and work. That baked good is what makes it particularly perfect for The Weekender.

Dig into these Cheese Danish »

Fresh Ginger — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, October 28th, 2011

ginger orange chicken cutlet recipe
People have been eating it for thousands of years, yet still no one can tell me why it should be peeled. So I don’t peel it, and neither should you. “It” being fresh ginger, the gnarly brown root that lives among the grocer’s Asian produce. And the flavor is so much better than dried — you must get to know it.

Most of us think of ginger as the powder in the spice cabinet and use it mostly for baking. In Asia, where ginger originated, it’s more a savory ingredient. That’s because fresh ginger packs tons of warm, pungent, peppery flavor that works so well with meats and vegetables.

Though they can be used interchangeably, the flavor of fresh ginger is more pronounced than dried, sporting heavy citrus, even acidic, notes. In Asia, fresh ginger is an essential part of numerous classic dishes, including stir-fries, soups, sauces and marinades, as well as Indian curries.

Ginger-Orange Chicken Cutlets »