All Posts In Recipes

Top 3 Beet Salad Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 30th, 2011

beet and apple salad
fall festAs November comes to a close, serve one last bright meal that channels summer and casts away the soon-to-be-winter chill. Beets are not only pretty, but this versatile root vegetable can be easily thrown into a quick salad.

When shopping, choose beets that are firm and have smooth skin. Small or medium-sized beets are often more tender, while their color can range from a garnet red to white.

Serve a Beet and Apple Salad (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine as an easy starter. Apples and sugar give this dish a natural sweetness, while endive and walnuts add some crunch.

More beet recipes from family and friends »

Flatbread With Bacon and Scallion Pesto — Recipe of the Day

by in Recipes, November 30th, 2011

flatbread with bacon and scallion pesto
Alex uses frozen pizza dough as the base for this upscale appetizer. Top with crème fraiche, briny caper-scallion pesto and crispy bacon.

Get the recipe: Flatbread With Bacon and Scallion Pesto

Browse more of Food Network’s easy and elegant appetizer recipes for the holidays.

Alex Makes: Indian Pudding

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, November 29th, 2011

alex guarnaschelli
This is a classic New England dessert my mother would make during the fall months. She would always make it in a deep, small dish, but I like a shallow (about 2-2 1/2 quart capacity) baking dish. The caramelized apples give the dessert a lighter, fruitier touch. I chose some of my favorite apple varieties for their flavor and ability to hold their shape while cooking. At my local farmers’ market, the guys always have great apple suggestions, and every season I like to pick a new apple variety and make it my “apple of the season.” Last year, I got stuck on the Mutsu for its tart, but also somewhat sweet-when-cooked flavor and crisp texture. This year, I am in search of the perfect cooking apple. What would that entail? An apple that would hold its shape when cooked and also retain a lot of flavor. Not an easy task. I am currently experimenting with Braeburn and Empire apples.

Get the recipe for Indian Pudding »

Penne With Roasted Tomatoes, Garlic and White Beans — Recipe of the Day

by in Recipes, November 29th, 2011

penne with roasted tomatoes, garlic and white beans
Ellie’s hearty, meatless pasta dish won’t break the bank for dinner tonight.

Get the recipe: Penne With Roasted Tomatoes, Garlic and White Beans

Browse more of Food Network’s smart indulgence recipes for the holidays.

Vegetable Shepherd’s Pie — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, November 28th, 2011


Still finding Thanksgiving leftovers buried in the back of your fridge? Put them to good use by incorporating them into a meatless shepherd’s pie. Maybe you have a few stray onions or celery stalks that didn’t make it into the stuffing — toss them in. Did you accidently buy too many carrots? No problem. This recipe calls for three. What to do with Grandma’s mashed potatoes? Repurpose them as the creamy topping on this hearty baked dish.

And if you’re not sure what to make with a lone can of pumpkin, Ellie Krieger’s Pumpkin Muffins are a sweet, spiced option for an easy breakfast treat or after-dinner snack.

Get the recipe: Vegetable Shepherd’s Pie from Food Network Magazine

Meatless Monday, an international movement, encourages people everywhere to cut meat one day a week for personal and planetary health. Browse more Meatless Monday recipes.

Baked Squash Gratin — The Weekender

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 25th, 2011

baked squash gratin
I come from one of those families where the Thanksgiving menu is essentially written on stone tablets. Many years ago, it was declared that there shall be turkey with stuffing (some cooked inside the bird and some cooked outside). Mashed potatoes are compulsory, as are sautéed Brussels sprouts, homemade gravy and cranberry jelly in the shape of a can.

When I was 12 years old, my cousin Jeremy brought an unscripted dish to our Thanksgiving table, but it was so wonderful that it was added to the holiday canon. It was a very large bowl of steamed and mashed butternut squash, enriched with a bit of powdered ginger and plenty of butter.

The only issue with this squash dish is that we somehow always manage to make so much of it that it ends up being totally out of proportion with the rest of the leftovers. The only thing that ends up outlasting is the gravy. (My father has trouble making less than a gallon of gravy.) Thankfully, I’ve discovered just the thing to transform all that squash and make it the most sought-after leftover around (though, if you make something else out of it, can it still be called a leftover?).

Before you start layering, read these tips »

Best 5 Thanksgiving Leftover Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 24th, 2011

next day turkey soup
One of the perks of hosting Thanksgiving dinner is that you get to keep most of the leftovers. But how are you ever going to use up the remains of that 20-pound bird and what can you do with all of those extra vegetables? Food Network’s five best leftover recipes below offer creative suggestions to rid your fridge of those Turkey Day remnants and more by repurposing them in easy ways that won’t slow you down on Black Friday.

5. Turkey Bolognese — To save time, Giada uses pre-made marinara sauce to make this simple but satisfying pasta dish, featuring dark-meat turkey and chopped vegetables.

4. Potato Croquettes — Paula coats leftover mashed potatoes in breadcrumbs and pan-fries them until golden brown with a crispy coating.

Get the top three recipes »

Quick Carrot Sides for Thanksgiving — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 23rd, 2011

carrots
Add a pop of color to your Thanksgiving spread with an easy carrot side. Whether you steam, boil or roast these bright root vegetables, they’re a perfect last-minute addition — done in 20 minutes or less.

For Middle Eastern flair, make Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Carrots With Za’atar (pictured above). Start by roasting the carrots in salt and pepper, then toss them with za’atar (a spice blend available at Middle Eastern markets), parsley and a splash of lemon.

Sunny’s Honey Glazed Carrots let the vegetable’s natural flavor shine through. Cook until a light honey glaze coats the carrots. We guarantee you won’t be able to eat just one.

More carrot recipes from family and friends »

Pre-Turkey Day Takeout

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 22nd, 2011

pizza
‘Twas the night before Thanksgiving and the cook was stressing. How am I going to cook a 20-pound turkey and warm up four casseroles with one oven and promise to eat at a reasonable hour? Should I stuff the bird or not? How will I know when the potatoes are done? Don’t forget to make sure that Aunt Sally doesn’t sit near Aunt Mary — there’s tension.

Thanksgiving isn’t even here yet and there is still so much to think about. So it’s no wonder that for many families, the dinner before Thanksgiving involves one thing: ordering takeout. In fact, USA Today reports that the day before Thanksgiving is among the five most popular days of the year for pizza delivery. But there’s no need to spend extra money in the name of convenience. With our five pre-Turkey Day dinner recipes below, you can have a meal on the table in 20 minutes or fewer, less than the amount of time it would take to order and deliver takeout.

Simple recipes, delicious results »

Sichuan Pepper — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, November 22nd, 2011

sichuan pepper meatballs
Any food that can make your tongue tingle has got to be worth a taste.

I’m not talking a seltzer-like zippiness or even a searing chili heat. I mean literally tingling because your tongue is at once numb and buzzingly alive.

That is the power of the Sichuan pepper (also called Sichuan peppercorn). But why would you want to (albeit mildly) numb your mouth? Because aside from the basic coolness of a tingling tongue, that sensation also changes the way you taste food seasoned with the pepper, adding a wonderful punchy vibrancy and warmth unlike anything else.

First, the basics. Despite appearances, Sichuan pepper is not a true peppercorn. It is the dried rind of the berry-like fruit of the prickly ash tree. And chances are, you’ve had it before. Sichuan pepper is a basic component of Chinese five-spice powder. As its name suggests, the spice has left a serious thumbprint on the cuisine of China’s Sichuan province. It also is used in Japan, where it is called sansho.

Get the recipe for Sichuan Pepper Meatballs »