All Posts In Recipes

Sichuan Pepper — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, November 22nd, 2011

sichuan pepper meatballs
Any food that can make your tongue tingle has got to be worth a taste.

I’m not talking a seltzer-like zippiness or even a searing chili heat. I mean literally tingling because your tongue is at once numb and buzzingly alive.

That is the power of the Sichuan pepper (also called Sichuan peppercorn). But why would you want to (albeit mildly) numb your mouth? Because aside from the basic coolness of a tingling tongue, that sensation also changes the way you taste food seasoned with the pepper, adding a wonderful punchy vibrancy and warmth unlike anything else.

First, the basics. Despite appearances, Sichuan pepper is not a true peppercorn. It is the dried rind of the berry-like fruit of the prickly ash tree. And chances are, you’ve had it before. Sichuan pepper is a basic component of Chinese five-spice powder. As its name suggests, the spice has left a serious thumbprint on the cuisine of China’s Sichuan province. It also is used in Japan, where it is called sansho.

Get the recipe for Sichuan Pepper Meatballs »

Best 5 Thanksgiving Appetizer Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 22nd, 2011

southern deviled eggs
Appetizers on Thanksgiving can be tricky to manage. After all, you want to serve your guests a few snacks but nothing that may fill them up or detract from the main meal. To solve your appetizer apprehensions, check out Food Network’s top five pre-Thanksgiving dinner recipes below for no-fuss appetizers that will pair perfectly with the bird.

5. Onion Dip from Scratch — Alton uses a combination of sour cream and mayonnaise to make his tangy dip, featuring fresh onions and a dash of garlic powder.

4. Crispy Smoked Mozzarella With Honey and Figs — Giada uses store-bought phyllo dough to save time when making these light and airy eats, which are stuffed with a smoky mozzarella, quickly deep fried and drizzled with a honey-fig sauce.

Get the top three recipes »

Taleggio Panini — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, November 21st, 2011

I simply can’t say enough good things about Taleggio cheese. At once nutty, salty, rich, creamy and decadent, it only gets better when it is melted and becomes soft and smooth. To make the ultimate grilled cheese sandwich that is literally oozing with gooey goodness, combine Taleggio with a light tomato sauce on slices of thick, rustic bread and lightly grill with butter. Quick enough to make on a weekday and hearty enough to be served as a simple supper, this easy, cheesy recipe will become a family favorite.

For a light side dish, try Aarti’s Massaged Kale Salad, tossed with fresh, ripe mango pieces and crunchy pumpkin seeds.

Get the recipe: Taleggio Panini from Food Network Magazine

Meatless Monday, an international movement, encourages people everywhere to cut meat one day a week for personal and planetary health. Browse more Meatless Monday recipes.

Gingerbread Waffles — The Weekender

by in Recipes, November 18th, 2011

gingerbread waffle recipe
I grew up in a waffle-loving household. At least one Saturday morning a month, my sister and I would convince our dad to stir up a batch of batter and pull out his curvy, chrome waffle iron (circa 1955).

He’d serve up the waffles as they came off the machine and it was up to us to add the butter and maple syrup (though my mother would watch our syrup application carefully to avoid over consumption). Often, my dad would make a double batch so that there’d be waffles for the freezer and weekday morning breakfasts.

These days, I make waffles on the same loose, monthly schedule that I know from growing up, always making some to eat and a few for the freezer. I used to be devoted to a vintage waffle iron that was much like the one I grew up with, but then, four years ago, someone gave me a modern one. It has nonstick plates and a timer that chimes gently when your waffle is finished cooking. It is heaven.

Before you fire up the waffle iron, read these tips »

Stuffing vs. Dressing, Plus 4 Recipes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 18th, 2011

Oyster DressingIn many homes, the words “stuffing” and “dressing” are used interchangeably to reference that steamy mixture of bread, veggies and herbs that takes second seat next to the turkey at your Thanksgiving table. Though for some, the loyalty to either stuffing or dressing over the other runs deep. But is there really a difference between stuffing and dressing? Which elements of the dishes dictate their classification as one and not the other? How should you cook the stuffing or dressing to ensure that it’s served piping hot and moist and has a subtle, crisp top? We have the answers, plus four foolproof recipes that will steal the side dish show at your Thanksgiving dinner.

Simply Stuffed: As its name suggests, stuffing is traditionally stuffed into the cavity of the turkey and roasted inside of it. Though this cooking method allows the bread to absorb all of those tasty turkey juices, it also poses a slight sanitation risk because of the raw bird. If you’re set on serving a traditional stuffing inside the turkey, the bread and the turkey thighs must be cooked to a minimum temperature of 165 degrees F.

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Best 5 Thanksgiving Desserts

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 17th, 2011

pumpkin cheesecake
After multiple helpings of savory stuffing, juicy turkey and veggie casseroles, a sugary plate is practically necessary. This Thanksgiving, look no further than our top five Thanksgiving desserts for classic recipes to serve as the perfect ending to your meal.

5. Pecan Pie — A welcomed combination of creamy and crunchy textures, this pie is baked on a rich butter crust and filled with a brown sugar-egg mixture dotted with toasted pecans.

4. Traditional Apple Pie — Cinnamon-laced apples are baked in a flaky shortening-based crust to create a timeless dessert that is ready in just over an hour.

Get the top three recipes »

Lemon Grass — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, November 17th, 2011

lemon grass chicken stir fry
It may look and sound like a weed, but lemon grass actually is one of the most important ingredients in Southeast Asian cooking. And it can transform the all-American foods you love.

Lemon grass is a reed-like plant that grows as a thin, firm 2-foot stalk with a small bulb at the base. It varies in color from pale yellow to very light green.

True to name, lemon grass has a pleasantly assertive lemon taste and aroma.

Lemon Grass Chicken Stir-Fry »

The Food Community Joins The Communal Table

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 16th, 2011

rosemary potatoes
Last week, FN Dish invited food bloggers from around the country to “pull up a chair” to our virtual Communal Table. Needless to say, we received link after link of incredible Thanksgiving dishes, tips and photos.

See what our new friends are bringing to the table and tell us what you would bring to the table on Twitter by using the hashtag: #pullupachair.

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The Communal Table — Fall Fest Special Edition

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 16th, 2011

pumpkin cake
In honor of Thanksgiving, Food Network and Fall Fest contributors are gathering together to share their favorite Thanksgiving recipes at our first ever Communal Table.

Today, browse through recipes for cocktails, appetizers, soups, salad, mains, and desserts. You can start drooling now.

Find out what our friends & family are bringing »

We’re Bringing the Turkey to The Communal Table: Thanksgiving Edition

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 16th, 2011

the communal table
Thanksgiving: It’s a holiday that requires a ton of preparation and can cause some stress, but in the end, we all love it and the memories make each moment worth it. Whether you have your recipes in order for the big day next week or you’re looking for some inspiration, we thought we would share some of the best offerings out there.

In honor of Thanksgiving, we’re kicking off the first annual Communal Table on Food Network, an event that we opened up to the entire food community. The response was outstanding — it blew us away. Experts from the industry were excited to “pull up a chair” to our table and offer readers their favorite recipes for appetizers, sides, salads, breads, mains, desserts and cocktails.

Find out what our friends & family are bringing »