All Posts In Recipes

Pollo Frito — The Weekender

by in Recipes, January 27th, 2012

pollo frito
Until last weekend, I’d never made fried chicken at home. This is primarily because I grew up in a household that did not deep-fry. My mother preferred the kind of cooking that employed a nonstick skillet and the barest coating of heart-friendly olive oil. When we’d go out to eat, she would expound on the many dangers of fried foods and point my sister and me toward lighter, more healthful options. French fries were a very rare treat and chicken fingers came only in baked varieties.

It wasn’t until high school that I had my first piece of fried chicken. A dear friend’s mother prided herself on her perfectly cooked, crisp, tender drumsticks and delighted in making it for us. I gobbled it down hungrily and didn’t tell my family.

In recent years, fried chicken has gotten increasingly trendy. It’s got a pleasantly retro-kitsch appeal, so higher-end restaurants have begun to add it to their menus. I’ve taken advantage of those offerings on occasion, all the while believing that it was still something best left to professionals or those families with a serious fried chicken tradition.

Before you start heating your oil, read these tips »

Chinese Takeout at Home

by in Recipes, January 27th, 2012

Though it’s easy to pick up the phone and order Chinese food takeout, it can be just as simple to cook up those white-box favorites in your own kitchen — often without the extra cost and unnecessary calories and fat. Prep your pantry for traditional Chinese recipes by picking up a few Asian-food staples, such as soy and chili sauces, rice wine vinegar and fresh ginger, and you’ll be ready to serve up classic appetizers and main dishes in a flash. Find a menu of our favorite Chinese foods below, including stir-fried chicken, fried rice, dumpling soup and more.

Though they’re far more heart-healthy than their deep-fried counterparts, Baked Spring Rolls are every bit as light, golden and perfectly crisp. Those pictured above from Food Network Magazine are filled with delicate lump crab, green cabbage and fresh ginger and served with a salty, sweet soy-mirin sauce.

More Chinese takeout recipes »

Best 5 Meatloaf Recipes

by in Recipes, January 26th, 2012

meatloaf recipe
A go-to comfort food favorite that the whole family will enjoy, meatloaf is a foolproof dish that is as quick to prepare as it is easy on the wallet. Whether you prefer turkey or beef varieties, adding fresh vegetables, spices and a tasty glaze to your meatloaf promises that it will be rich in texture and bold flavors. Check out Food Network’s top five meatloaf recipes below and cook up one for dinner tonight.

5. New Classic Meatloaf — Quick-cooking oats and molasses are “new” ingredients Ellie adds to her traditional meatloaf recipe, featuring ground beef, button mushrooms and herbs.

4. Turkey Meatloaf With Feta and Sun-Dried Tomatoes — Chewy herb-marinated sun-dried tomatoes and tangy feta cheese offer texture and a Mediterranean flair to Giada’s easy weeknight meatloaf.

Get the top three recipes for meatloaf »

Recipes With Color: Pink Champagne

by in Recipes, January 24th, 2012

bobby flay's grapefruit and mint salad
Ringing in the new year is a color that is both fresh and luscious. On HGTV’s Color of the Month blog, January’s hue has stirred up mixed reactions in the design world, but for food enthusiasts it’s a vital hue from our food rainbow. We see it in immunity-boosting foods like citrus and salmon. The hero this month is a shade called Pink Champagne and it’s here to rescue us from nagging colds in the form of grapefruit.

For me, this happy color is an escape from winter. Growing up, my aunt used to send baskets of oranges and grapefruits from Florida every winter. Savoring a slice of grapefruit this time of year always brings back warm memories for me. In lieu of this year’s shipment, I have been stocking up on bags of Florida pink grapefruits from the store and eating one every day. Why carve out half a grapefruit when you can enjoy the whole thing?

Read more

An Italian Feast

by in Recipes, January 23rd, 2012

It’s not too early to start thinking about dinner this weekend. Ditch those jarred tomato sauces, grab the family and cook up an authentic Italian-style feast in your own kitchen. We’ve compiled an entire menu of trattoria classics, such as pasta with meat sauce, hunter-style chicken, traditional tiramisu and more, so that you can bring the tried-and-true tastes of Italy into your home. Check out our favorite Italian recipes below, then let us know how you prepare your best Italian dishes.

If your Sunday dinners are anything like those at my house, they inevitably involve pasta with meat sauce, and maybe some ravioli or gnocchi, too. Food Network Magazine’s heavenly Sunday Meat Sauce With Orecchiette (pictured above) is full of robust flavors and hearty ingredients, including almost a dozen garlic cloves, authentic San Marzano tomatoes, tender beef and moist meatballs. Instead of resorting to spaghetti or rigatoni, give orecchiette noodles a try — the sauce perfectly coats and seeps into the underbelly of this tiny turtle shell-shaped pasta.

Read more

Steamed Vegetables With Roasted Chickpeas — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, January 23rd, 2012

With abundant flavor, color and texture, this vibrant dish is the ultimate vegetarian plate. Crisp snow peas, tender squash and hearty brown rice combine with chickpeas cooked in a simple sesame oil-scallion mixture to create a fill-you-up lunch or dinner that is bursting with fresh tastes.

To add a serving of healthful greens to your meal, prepare a quick Spinach and Kale Salad, best served hot with red bell peppers and tangy balsamic vinegar.

Get the recipe: Steamed Vegetables With Roasted Chickpeas from Food Network Magazine

Meatless Monday, an international movement, encourages people everywhere to cut meat one day a week for personal and planetary health. Browse more Meatless Monday recipes.

Red Pork Posole — The Weekender

by in Recipes, January 20th, 2012

red pork posole
Come January, I’m ready to hunker down. Finally clear of the holiday frenzy, I crave slow evenings, mulled cider and the occasional quiet dinner party with a few friends.

Late-winter entertaining is a whole different beast from the string of holiday parties that stretch out across November and December. Now’s the time for slow-cooked, rich braises and stews that need nothing more than a glass of red wine to feel complete.

Last year, I spent most of this first month making oven-roasted beef stew. The year before, I revisited a braised turkey leg dish that I grew up eating out of my grandmother’s oval aluminum pot. This year, I can’t get the idea of pork posole out of my mind.

In the past, I’ve made green posole with a tomatillo puree, which is wonderfully mild and flavorful. Wanting to try something new, I determined that January 2012 is going to be focused on getting Rachael Ray’s recipe for Red Pork Posole just right.

Before you start braising, read Marisa’s tips »

What Is Quinoa? Plus the Best 5 Quinoa Recipes

by in Recipes, January 20th, 2012

quinoa salad
New Year’s healthy eating resolutions are all the rage right now, and countless conversations suggest how we should eat to start 2012 on a wholesome note. Included in many good-for-you lists is one tiny food that packs a huge healthful punch: quinoa, pronounced (KEEN-wah), which is loaded with protein, fiber and magnesium.

Though it is smaller than rice, barley, farro and bulgur, quinoa looks like a grain, thanks to its neutral coloring and hard exterior. However, it is actually a seed that originates from the cousin of the spinach plant. When cooked, these seeds expand rapidly and significantly, become tender but chewy and expel spirals that boast the slightest crunch. When using quinoa, it’s important to rinse it thoroughly before boiling, as it’s often coated with saponins that are bitter and need to be removed.

After cooking in liquid — water or chicken broth are most common — quinoa becomes light, fluffy, nutty and the ideal canvas to showcase intense flavors, rich textures and your favorite veggies, meats and sauces. Give this super seed a try, using Food Network’s five best quinoa recipes and let us know what you think of it.

Get the top five quinoa recipes »

Healthy Spinach Artichoke Dip — Simple Soirées

by in Recipes, January 19th, 2012

healthy spinach dip
Now that the holidays are officially over and most of us are in cookie detox mode, it’s time to bring on the lighter appetizers for fun get-togethers you might be throwing. I’m a huge fan of Spinach Artichoke Dip. It’s one of those classic comforting appetizers and it’s perfect for these midwinter gatherings I’ve been throwing. Just because the holidays are over doesn’t mean that fun and simple soirees have to go away. I’ve been having friends over for casual midweek dinners and introducing them to new lightened-up recipes.

This Spinach Artichoke Dip from Ellie Krieger is the perfect example. You’ll never guess that this recipe is lightened up because it’s still super flavorful and just as addicting as its full-fat cousin. Plus, it would be an excellent addition to your upcoming Super Bowl menu. I made a few changes to spice things up a bit more and make it extra delicious. My favorite mix-in wound up being the addition of pepper jack cheese — it gave the dip an extra kick.

Get Gaby’s lightened-up version »

Hoisin — Off the Beaten Aisle

by in How-to, Recipes, January 19th, 2012

hoisin turkey meatball grinders
Mmmm … Nothing says good eats like soy residue.

Except that in Chinese cooking, it really can. And you very likely have enjoyed that soy residue. Many times and in many ways.

We’re talking about hoisin sauce, a classic ingredient for sauces — both for dipping at the table and basting during cooking — in China.

Hoisin is a thick, dark red-to-brown sauce that blends sweet-spicy-savory flavors, a profile not all that different from ketchup. It is made from the leftover mash of fermented soy beans produced when making traditional soy sauces. That mash is combined with sugar, chiles, garlic, vinegar, salt, sometimes five-spice powder and either flour or cornstarch (to thicken).

Though hoisin is widely used on grilled meats (as a barbecue sauce) and in dipping sauces, it’s best known for a starring role in Peking duck and moo shu pork.

Read more