All Posts In Recipes

The New Orange and Black

by in Food Network Magazine, Recipes, October 19th, 2015

chocolate doughnut holesYou don’t have to bake ghoulish cupcakes or serve garlicky anti-vampire snacks to throw a good Halloween bash. Instead of going the spooky route, serve a beautiful dessert dressed in the official holiday colors: orange and black. Food Network Magazine created four new recipes that are classy enough for a cocktail party but sweet enough for any little monsters in your life.

Chocolate Doughnut Holes

A platter full of doughnut holes is much more tempting than a bowl filled with candy. This recipe yields about five dozen chocolate-glazed bites, which is especially great if you’re planning on a full (haunted) house on the 31st.

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Guy’s Cheesy Roasted Acorn Squash — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, October 19th, 2015

Roasted Acorn Squash with Mushrooms, Peppers and Goat CheeseNo matter what in-season veggie you happen to have on hand, chances are that after just a quick roast in the oven, it will have turned oh-so-sweet — and seasonal squash is no exception. Butternut, acorn, spaghetti and delicata squashes are all overflowing at farmers market stands and in supermarket aisles alike this time of year, and while you can indeed simply roast them and enjoy them as is, in all their tender glory, dressing them up a bit with bold, fresh flavors will transform them even more.

In his recipe for Roasted Acorn Squash with Mushrooms, Peppers and Goat Cheese, Guy Fieri precooks the squash for a few minutes in the oven before filling it with a hearty, savory stuffing that’s easy to make yet endlessly impressive. He opts for a mixture of cremini mushrooms, fresh cabbage and colorful bell peppers for heft and texture, plus a few cloves of garlic for over-the-top taste. Follow Guy’s lead and top the filling mixture with goat cheese and roasted acorn seeds before baking; the tangy crumbles of cheese deliver the richness you crave, while the acorn seeds promise a welcome salty, crunchy bite.

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Save the Seeds After Carving Your Pumpkin — Here’s What to Do with Them

by in Recipes, Shows, October 17th, 2015

Curried Pumpkin SeedsClassically happy, silly or downright sad — no matter what face you carve into your jack-o’-lantern, be sure to save the seeds you likely scraped from the inside of the pumpkin. These crunchy bits are blank canvases in the snack world. On their own they have a mild flavor, but they can be dressed up with sweet, smoky, salty and savory flavors alike. The co-hosts of The Kitchen shared their top tricks for transforming these seasonal eats on this morning’s all-new episode; each recipe comes together in less than 30 minutes and is as simple as combining a few dried spices and baking until golden brown.

Curried Pumpkin Seeds (pictured above): To help the curry powder stick to the pumpkin seeds, coat them in a bit of coconut oil before adding the seasonings. Just a sprinkle of salt will help balance the warm flavor of the curry powder.

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How to Set Up a Waffle Bar in 3 Easy Steps

by in Family, Recipes, October 16th, 2015

How to Set Up a Waffle Bar in 3 Easy StepsWaffle bars aren’t just for breakfast (though they’re great for that). They also make awesome family dinners and serve as the perfect party buffet. Best of all, they’re deceptively simple. Even the most-festive waffle bar can be set up in three easy steps.

1. First, decide on the waffle recipe you’ll use. A few fan-favorite suggestions:

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The 5 Best Recipes for Cooking with Fresh Pumpkin

by in Recipes, October 15th, 2015

Pumpkin Queso FundidoIf you’ve ever made, say, a pumpkin pie at home, odds are you didn’t get your pumpkin fresh from the patch. Pure pumpkin puree exists in canned form, making it one of the most-convenient ways to get your pumpkin fix all season (and, arguably, all year) long. This fall, however, we’re celebrating the season by bringing fresh pumpkin into our recipes. Whether it’s for dinner or dessert, these recipes use pumpkin for a whole lot more than carving.

Whether you serve it for Halloween, Thanksgiving or any kind of fall party, Food Network Magazine’s Pumpkin Queso Fundido (pictured above) is the party-starting appetizer of your dreams. Use a roasted sugar pumpkin as your dip bowl and each scoop of this gooey, cheesy dip will take morsels of cooked pumpkin along with it.

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6 Ways Cauliflower Can Stand In for Other Favorite Foods — Fall Fest

by in Recipes, October 15th, 2015

Buffalo Cauliflower with Blue Cheese SauceWhat can’t cauliflower do? With its ability to transform into any number of forms, unassuming cauliflower is a veggie with serious superpowers. It can be fried, pureed, mashed, roasted and more, all with a flavor that feels more indulgent than the vegetable truly is. Now that this hearty and versatile vegetable is in season, use it as a stand-in for some of your favorites, whether it’s as an appetizer, a side dish or a main.

Buffalo Wings

Nibbling chicken wings off the bone is an American pastime that isn’t going anywhere, but Food Network Kitchen has developed a no-meat version of the bar and party snack that everyone can dig into. Whether you’re a vegetarian or not, Buffalo Cauliflower with Blue Cheese Sauce (pictured above) is sure to please, with a spicy Buffalo coating and a cool, creamy blue cheese dipping sauce. Plus, it comes with a fraction of the calories and fat of Buffalo wings.

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Triple-Chocolate Boston Cream Pie — Bake-Ahead Batches

by in Recipes, October 13th, 2015

My first encounter with Boston cream pie was in doughnut form when I was in middle school. My best friend Melissa’s family had a standing Saturday doughnut-breakfast policy. It was one of my favorite parts about sleeping over her place on Friday night. Her parents would go out early Saturday morning and bring the treats back for us. While they drank coffee, we ate doughnuts in our pajamas. I always chose Boston cream and I always wished I could eat more than one.

There is something so magical about the Boston cream combination: cool, creamy custard nestled in fluffy cake and topped with bittersweet chocolate. It’s the perfect dessert for the indecisive. Chocolate, vanilla, cake and custard all wrapped up in one. It’s a genius invention.

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Spicy Macaroni and Cheese — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, October 12th, 2015

Spicy Macaroni and CheeseWhile some recipes require a bit of (worthwhile) finagling to make them meatless, macaroni and cheese isn’t one of them. Kids and adults, meat eaters and vegetarians, picky eaters and voracious culinarians — seemingly everyone is pleased when a bowl of piping-hot, ooey-gooey mac and cheese is set before them.

When it comes to classic recipes, this one for baked macaroni and cheese and this one for the stovetop variety are go-to places to start. But for a next-level twist on the traditional version, try Sunny Anderson’s 5-star Spicy Macaroni and Cheese (pictured above). It boasts all of the cheesy richness you crave — there are a whopping three kinds of cheeses in this indulgent recipe — but the pinch of cayenne adds a welcome boost of heat. To add to the creamy texture in this big-batch casserole, Sunny adds a bit of tangy sour cream to the cheese mixture, and then she balances out that texture with a crispy-crunchy topping of buttery croutons.

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10 Recipes Every Alex Guarnaschelli Fan Should Master

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, October 12th, 2015

10 Recipes Every Alex Guarnaschelli Fan Should MasterYou may know Alex Guarnaschelli best as a judge on Chopped or for mentoring All-Star Academy home cooks to culinary success. As a skilled Iron Chef, Alex wows fans with her elegant and approachable dishes, which combine the comforting flavors of American, Italian and French cuisines. Keep reading below for more of Alex’s best-ever recipes, like her tried-and-true chocolate cake and her decadent eggplant parmigiana that is sure to please a crowd. Plus, get a behind-the-scenes look at Butter Restaurant in New York City, where she cooks up seasonal dishes when she’s not on camera or at home.

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Apple Picking in New England and What I’m Cooking with 20 Pounds of Apples

by in Food Network Chef, Recipes, October 10th, 2015

Apple Crumbple with Cardamom-Vanilla Caramel SaucePhilippe and I took our family apple picking last weekend in a lush, green New Hampshire orchard, and my love for this perfectly crisp, juicy, sweet fruit has been renewed. Watching my sweet daughter Charlotte reach up to a tree heavy with ruby-red fruit and pluck her first apple ever warmed my heart. And seeing Océane nibble on two different apples — one in each hand, while the picking bag, full of fruit, hung heavy looped around her tiny forearm — had me smiling (and mentally preparing for the aftermath of letting four girls freely pick as many apples as they wished). I wondered just how many apples the Transportation Security Administration would let us stash in our carry-on suitcases (the answer: a lot, but only after being pulled out of line for a thorough swabbing of the 20 or so pounds of apples we packed).

During the past few days since our trip to the orchard, we’ve snacked on more apples than I thought possible, given apples to each of the girls’ teachers (and the girls’ teachers from last year, because why leave them out?) and we still have two huge fruit bowls brimming with apples of all kinds. We have tart, firm cooking apples, crisp eating varieties, thick-skinned greenish apples that I don’t recognize but love once I get past the reptile-like skin, trusty red apples and Golden Delicious apples. I’m baking up some basics: my favorite Classic Apple Tart (with an easy butter crust that’s unbelievably good!), a Quick Cinnamon Apple Tart (perfect for when I’m feeling rushed) and my Apple Crumble with Cardamom-Vanilla Caramel Sauce (pictured above). But apples don’t have to be just for sweets. I’ll add a cup or two of cubed (or julienned) apple to my Fennel and Cabbage Slaw or to my Asian Coleslaw (my personal favorite), where some apple will add just the right level of tangy, sweet and tart to complement the warm ginger and spicy Sriracha. And if we still have a few stragglers left next week that somehow didn’t make it into a recipe or someone’s mouth for an after-school snack, I’ll cube them up and simmer them in a bit of water with a cinnamon stick, a squeeze of lemon juice and a dash of maple syrup (also from our New England trip) and make an easy, chunky compote. (Or you can blend up the mixture for a smoother applesauce.) Now I feel like autumn is official.

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