All Posts In Recipes

Chocolate Stout Cupcakes — The New Girl

by in Holidays, Recipes, March 13th, 2013

Chocolate Stout CupcakesIn the spirit of St. Patrick’s Day, beer takes the kitchen spotlight each March. Even if you’re not much of a beer drinker, this sudsy ingredient adds a wonderful depth of flavor without overpowering a recipe. I love the idea of adding a splash to Corned Beef or Irish Stew, but this year my mind was set on cupcakes.

I enjoy a light lager on game day or a crisp IPA with my Friday night pizza, but, to me, stout is the ultimate treat. I’ve never been to Ireland, and I am no connoisseur when it comes to how to pour the perfect pint, but I can appreciate its deliciousness all the same. With its smooth chocolate and coffee notes, stout will be your next secret weapon in baking.

Dave Lieberman’s Chocolate Stout Cupcakes are the perfect treats to please a party crowd. The taste of stout beer is subtle but becomes delectably more noticeable with each bite. Even if you can’t distinguish the actual beer flavor, it enhances the chocolate and makes for a rich, not-too-sweet cupcake. Top it off with velvety cream cheese icing and you’ve found your pot of gold.

A few things to consider before making this recipe

The Most Satisfying Pasta Dishes — Comfort Food Feast

by in Family, Recipes, March 13th, 2013

Food Network Magazine's Skillet LasagnaThere’s a time and a place for classic Italian pasta dishes. You know, the kind where al dente spaghetti is lackadaisically draped over the plate and a few sprigs of basil are planted on top. This time around, we’re digging only pasta dishes that require a sturdy spoon to lift up every last layer. With dishes as comforting as these, it’s hard to believe it all started with rigid pasta. Thank goodness for the great art of boiling water, right?

Alton Brown’s Baked Macaroni and Cheese combines the classic elbow shape with freshly shredded sharp cheddar and hints of paprika and mustard. It’s just what you would expect out of the traditional baked rendition and, man, is it good. If you’re looking to move beyond the quintessential mac, try out Food Network Magazine’s Buffalo-Chicken Macaroni and Cheese. It’s spiked with hot sauce and loaded with store-bought rotisserie chicken.

This collection wouldn’t be complete without a recipe like Neelys Baked Ziti or a good lasagna. For once, the latter isn’t restricted to the casserole dish. Food Network Magazine’s Skillet Lasagna packs all that baked flavor using just the stove. Scattered with ground beef and two types of cheese, Paula Deen’s Baked Spaghetti fixes the strands into melted, bubbly form in the oven.

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The Apple of My Eye — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in Recipes, March 11th, 2013

Apple-Cheddar Squash SoupIf I say apple, what kind of recipe comes to mind? I’m betting most of you thought about pie, and for a good reason. Who can resist tender apples tucked into a flaky, buttery crust? Once you get past the many variations of this classic American dessert, though, there’s a whole world of savory dishes to explore.

Apples work especially well with assertively flavored ingredients. The natural sweetness shines through when it’s sauteed or roasted, helping to temper earthy root vegetables and spicy foods. Last year one of my favorite combinations was roasting it with parsnips and onions. I’d give the whole thing a whirl in the blender with some vegetable broth for a thick, creamy, dairy-free soup (and vegan, too).

Keep reading for apple-centric savory recipes

Easy Grain Salads — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, March 11th, 2013

Mediterranean Farro SaladWhile rice is perhaps the most traditional starchy side dish, there are indeed other grains to swap in when you’re looking to switch up your usual dinner routine. Just like rice, easy-to-make farro, bulgur and couscous become tender and satisfying when boiled, and they stand up well to bold ingredients and flavorful sauces. Think of these grains as blank slates; use them as a way to put leftover vegetables to work, to experiment with new-to-you herbs and to introduce unfamiliar flavors to your family for the first time. Check out a few of Food Network’s favorite grain salads below, then browse these photos to find more ways to cook with grains.

In her top-rated recipe for Mediterranean Farro Salad (pictured above), Giada pairs these slightly chewy bites with colorful produce like green beans and red pepper, plus black olives and chunks of nutty Parmesan cheese. A key element to her salad is the simple vinaigrette. To prepare it, just mix a splash of sherry vinegar with fruity olive oil and tangy Dijon for a light topping that won’t disappoint. Watch this video to see how Giada makes the salad from start to finish.

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Dinner in a Hurry: Quick-Fix Recipes for Meals on the Go

by in Family, Recipes, March 9th, 2013

Cheesy Gnocchi Casserole With Ham and PeasWhile there’s a time and a place for indulgent three-course feasts complete with slow-simmered sauces, stuffed meats and warm desserts, busy weekday evenings are not it. Often there’s barely enough time in the day to grocery shop let alone cook any food you may have managed to pick up, and when those days strike, it’s important to have an arsenal full of fuss-free recipes to rescue you from dinnertime stress. Known kid-approved picks and easy-to-make-and-eat classics will help you put a supper on the table that’s both deliciously simple and satisfying. Check out a few of Food Network’s favorite quick recipes below, then tell us in the comments: What tried-and-true meal do you reach for on frenzied weeknights?

Perhaps the ultimate family-friendly meal, casseroles are one of easiest go-to dinners, as they boast the simplicity of an all-in-one supper and can often be made with whatever ingredients you happen to have on hand. Food Network Kitchens’ 30-minute recipe for Cheesy Gnocchi Casserole With Ham and Peas (pictured above) puts the fridge and freezer to work with deli ham and frozen peas. Laced with fresh thyme and rich heavy cream, this Swiss cheese-finished bake is a cinch to prepare thanks to store-bought potato gnocchi.

Keep reading for more easy recipes

How to Make Your Own Corned Beef for St. Patrick’s Day

by in Recipes, March 9th, 2013

corned beef and cabbageWhen it comes to celebrating St. Patrick’s Day in America, a big part of the holiday is sitting down to a dinner of corned beef, typically boiled with cabbage, carrots and other root vegetables. But have you ever thought about how corned beef got to be “corned”? It’s actually not as difficult as you may imagine. If you know how to brine, or marinate, you’re already one step closer to making corned beef successfully in your own kitchen.

In the weeks leading up to the holiday, you can find packaged corned beef in the meat section of your local supermarket. This beef has already been corned, which means it has been cured in a brine of salt, sugar and spices. That’s really all it takes to make corned beef. The only catch is planning ahead, because the curing process does take some time (just about a week or so). But if you’ve got the time and want to try it at home yourself, Food Network has just the right recipe for you. And the best part is you’ll be able to tell your family that you made the corned beef from scratch — how many people can say that?

Get the recipe for homemade corned beef

Old-Fashioned Cocoa Cake With Caramel Icing — The Weekender

by in Entertaining, Recipes, March 8th, 2013

Old-Fashioned Cocoa Cake With Caramel IcingI am the designated birthday dessert baker for my circle of close friends and dear family members. Every year, I make a dozen or more cakes, pies, tarts and meringue concoctions for parties, picnics and small family dinners.

It starts in January with my dad’s birthday. Tradition dictates that he gets a thing called Pinch Pie (though it’s neither pinched, nor is it a pie). It’s a meringue shell filled with ice cream, strawberries, whipped cream and toasted almonds. It’s a sugar bomb, but it’s beloved in my family.

In February, both my sister and my husband celebrate. When she was younger, Raina was into ice cream cakes, but these days she prefers something dense and chocolatey. Scott, on the other hand, hasn’t shifted his preferences since childhood. He likes to celebrate with a Funfetti cake made from a boxed mix. Though it violates my from-scratch sensibilities, that’s what he gets.

As we head into March, I start thinking about baking for my friend Shay’s big day. She doesn’t have a standard cake, instead preferring to try something new. Last time I did a carrot cake, and this year I’ve been planning something layered and featuring chocolate.

Before you start baking, read these tips

Best 5 Salmon Recipes

by in Recipes, March 7th, 2013

Whole-Wheat Spaghetti With Lemon, Basil and SalmonKnown for its trademark light-orange hue and heart-healthy proteins, salmon is a naturally flavorful fish, one that even kids and picky seafood challengers enjoy. Salmon can stand up to high heat and pairs well with the taste of charcoal, which is why many recipes prefer to grill the light, flaky fillets. In the winter months, however, instead of standing over a barbecue in the bone-chilling snow, prepare salmon in the warmth of your kitchen using easy cooking techniques like poaching, baking and sauteing. We’ve rounded up Food Network’s top-five salmon dishes, each with stress-free recipes that can be made easily indoors. Check out the classic and creative takes on this family-friendly fish below, then browse our entire collection of salmon recipes.

5. Crispy Salmon Croquettes With Remoulade Sauce — Similar to crab cakes, Sandra’s golden-brown bites are made with prepared salmon and a filling of egg, a splash of hot sauce and fish-fry coating mix for added flavor, then pan-fried until warm and served with a cool mayonnaise-garlic sauce.

4. Salmon and Dill Chowder With Pastry Crust — Rachael remakes the everyday chicken pot pie into a hearty seafood bowl, complete with a creamy combination of poached salmon, celery and potatoes, finished with a pre-baked flaky crust.

Get the top three recipes

Beyond the Teacup: 9 Recipes Made With Tea

by in Recipes, March 6th, 2013

Tea-Smoked ChickenIf you’re a big tea drinker, you probably go through cups and cups of the cozy hot beverage on a daily basis. It’s a great way to relax and recharge, to soothe the throat or maybe it’s just a habit. But have you ever taken a moment to think about what uses tea may have in cooking? It’s a given that teas are flavorful — black teas are strong, green teas are light and then there are so many more types in between. Take some tea — maybe even your favorite kind — and incorporate it into a recipe. You’re bound to get flavorful results, not to mention a very creative meal.

There are actually many uses for teas in recipes: brining, poaching, braising and even baking are some methods that benefit from its use. And the best part is, these recipes don’t make you go out of your way to use the tea — in most cases it’s just swapping in brewed tea for the liquid that you would normally have used, like the water or stock in a braise, for example. If you’re willing to give cooking with tea a try, here are some of Food Network’s best recipes.

Get the recipes using tea

Grilled Cheese Goes Beyond Cheese — Comfort Food Feast

by in Recipes, March 6th, 2013

Ina Garten's Ultimate Grilled CheeseWe don’t need to be the ones to tell you there’s no science to a grilled cheese. For a Classic American Grilled Cheese, simply slather slices of white bread with some butter, pile on the American cheese and get it on the griddle. Things start to get more interesting, however, when your ingredient list broadens beyond just one cheese, bringing on a whole new spectrum of flavor.

Let’s start on the grilled sandwich that focuses on the cheese itself: This Three-Cheese Grilled Cheese recipe by Food Network Magazine stacks cheddar, Swiss and American before heating to melted perfection. Forgoing slices, Rachael Ray’s garlic-buttered Grilled 4-Cheese Sandwiches come laden with four shredded varieties — provolone, mozzarella, Parmesan and Asiago.

More often than not, the supreme grilled cheese is achieved using two simple ingredients: cheese and juicy tomatoes. Food Network Magazine’s Open-Faced Tomato Grilled Cheese renounces that extra dose of bread, and its Triple Grilled Cheese With Tomato Soup pairs the sandwich with its consummate match.

Add meat to the traditional grilled cheese for a well-rounded sandwich. Ina Garten’s Ultimate Grilled Cheese (pictured above) for Food Network Magazine fuses bacon and two kinds of cheese, while its Corned Beef Grilled Cheese comes together with spicy whole grain mustard, grated Jarlsberg and freshly sliced deli meat. Food Network Magazine’s Ham-Taleggio Grilled Cheese counters the salt of the meat with the sweet crunch of green apple.

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