All Posts In Recipes

Alton Cooks the Superstar Sabotage: Meatballs

by in Recipes, Shows, November 6th, 2014

While many consider meatballs the ultimate accompaniment to classic spaghetti and tomato sauce, these traditionally beefy rounds go beyond Italian comfort food, as Superstar Sabotage winner Eric Greenspan showed off on last night’s finale when he presented them in an Asian-style dish. Host Alton Brown, too, puts a creative spin on the everyday meatball in his easy-to-make recipe for Swedish Meatballs (pictured above).

Ideal for weekend tailgating or a casual appetizer, Alton’s top-rated meatballs are made with a mix of ground beef and pork, and they’re portioned into bite-size rounds so they’re easy to eat at a party. The key element of Alton’s recipe is his gravy; instead of simmering the meatballs in a tomato-garlic sauce, he sautes them on the stove before blanketing them in a rich, creamy broth-based topping laced with fragrant allspice.

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Deconstructed Falafel Salad — The Weekender

by in Recipes, November 6th, 2014

Deconstructed Falafel SaladLet’s talk lunch. There is no better time to think about packing a few weekday lunches than over the weekend. If you wait until Monday, the battle is already lost. But if you devote even just half an hour on Saturday or Sunday to prep some lettuce and a couple of interesting toppings, the entire week is just better.

It means that instead of snacking aimlessly throughout the day or spending way too much money on a takeout meal, you have a solid lunch to look forward to.

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8 Crowd-Pleasing Brussels Sprouts for Your Thanksgiving Table — Fall Fest

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 6th, 2014

Balsamic-Roasted Brussels SproutsFrom the stuffing to the mashed potatoes, there are certain sides you just can’t do without on Thanksgiving. Now, more than ever, once-unloved Brussels sprouts have eclipsed a lot of other vegetables, working to balance an otherwise heavy meal. As you begin brainstorming the must-haves for your Thanksgiving menu, be sure to work these simple yet to-die-for Brussels sprouts sides into the lineup.

1. Balsamic-Roasted Brussels Sprouts — Ina Garten’s Brussels sprouts (pictured above) are perhaps the most elegant of all, layering the flavor of salty diced pancetta with fruity, tart balsamic vinegar.

2. Roasted Brussels Sprouts  — Food Network Magazine’s back-to-basics recipe may simply involve roasting, but the smart addition of red pepper flakes, white wine vinegar and honey leave every caramelized sprout layered with flavor.

3. Brussels Sprouts Gratin — This cheesy veggie side takes only five ingredients, including a topping of Gruyère cheese that instills a creamy nuttiness in every bite. 

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Cutthroat Kitchen Host Alton Recaps the Superstar Sabotage Tournament

by in Recipes, Shows, November 6th, 2014

Alton BrownIn true tournament fashion, the final moments were some of the most anticipated in Cutthroat Kitchen‘s first-ever installment of Superstar Sabotage. Over the course of four weeks, 16 of your favorite A-list culinary masters took their places in the Cutthroat arena for no-holds-barred competition, subjecting themselves to sabotage upon sabotage all in the name of charity. But last night, the final four rivals — Chefs Aarti Sequeira, Eric Greenspan, Fabio Viviani and Marcel Vigneron — went to battle in the last heat, and as fans might have expected, host Alton Brown saved some of his shock-and-awe flashes until the very end. Read on below to hear from Alton as he looks back at a most-memorable finale.

For the first time ever, you doubled chefs’ bank accounts and gifted them a total of $50,000 to spend during the finale. Is that allowance a blessing or a curse, and do you think that allowance changed the course of play?
Alton Brown: It’s only a blessing or a curse if you’re on the receiving end of it at the end of the day. For whatever charity gets the money, then it can be a huge blessing. But really, in the kitchen environment, it’s kind of play money in a way. It almost doesn’t matter. It could be millions and it wouldn’t matter.

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Best 5 Thanksgiving Appetizers

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 5th, 2014

While you want your Thanksgiving dinner guests to have something to munch on when they arrive at your house, you don’t want them to fill up on snacks and ultimately be too full to enjoy the feast. So, when it comes to dishing out appetizers on turkey day, less is more; think small bites of crunchy nuts, a simple soup or a creamy cheese. These fuss-free starters will satisfy the crowd and leave them craving the main event, but — as a bonus for you, the host or hostess — most are quick to prepare. Read on below for Food Network’s top-five Thanksgiving appetizer recipes to find ideas fit for the feast, then check out Thanksgiving Central for more appetizer inspiration.

5. Devilish Eggs — Ready to eat in less than 25 minutes, these classic deviled eggs are lightened up with the help of tofu, which stretches the traditionally indulgent mustard-laced yolk filling.

4. Hot Spinach and Artichoke Dip — Follow Alton Brown’s lead and save time in the kitchen by starting with frozen spinach and frozen artichokes to make his quick-fix dip. He mixes tangy sour cream with cream cheese, plus a dollop of mayonnaise and a pinch of garlic powder, for over-the-top richness.

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Ina’s Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes: The Secret to Stress-Free Thanksgiving Spuds

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 4th, 2014

Goat Cheese Mashed PotatoesOne of the trickiest parts of pulling off Thanksgiving dinner is ensuring that each of the (many, many) components of the meal are ready to eat — and are warm — at the same time. For many, deciding when and how to delegate the precious oven and stove spaces becomes a puzzle as they make mental notes of how long the turkey ought to rest, how quickly water can boil for the potatoes and at what temperature the rolls should bake. This year, however, with the help of Ina Garten, the ever-together hostess, you can tackle one key element of the feast ahead of time: mashed potatoes.

The success of mashed potatoes depends on a super-creamy finished product, and sure enough, when you follow Ina’s boil-and-bake method for her make-ahead Goat Cheese Mashed Potatoes from Food Network Magazine, pictured above, the results are soft, smooth spuds. Instead of simply mashing potatoes and letting them rest until dinner — which would likely cause them to turn tough — she assembles the rich, cheesy dish up to three days in advance, refrigerates it, then bakes it with a Parmesan cheese topping before eating.

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Butternut Squash and Kale Stir-Fry — Meatless Monday

by in Recipes, November 3rd, 2014

Butternut Squash and Kale Stir Fry
Sometimes, you just want to keep it simple on Monday. With The Pioneer Woman’s Butternut Squash and Kale Stir-Fry, two popular ingredients of the moment — kale and butternut squash — are really all it takes to make your meal filling and flavorful. So for this Meatless Monday, you’ll get an easy dose of vitamins without feeling like you’re sacrificing taste or time. An added bonus to this dish? Its vibrant colors that make it just as good to look at as it is to eat.

First you’ll heat butter and olive oil in a large skillet over high heat. Then add the squash, seasoning it with salt, chili powder and pepper. Cook the squash, turning it with a spatula, until it’s deep golden brown and tender. Then take it out and set it aside on a plate.

Melt the remaining butter in the skillet over medium-high heat and add the kale. Toss the kale and let it cook for about 3 or 4 minutes. Then add in the squash and toss it together with the kale.

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Yeast Rolls: A Homemade Breadbasket Favorite

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 3rd, 2014

Yeast Rolls
There’s no denying it, Thanksgiving can be a hectic holiday. If you’re longing for a new homemade recipe to add to your menu, then we’ve got the perfect solution. This year, leave those canned rolls on the store shelves. Yeast Rolls are the ideal authentic side dish that you can prepare intermittently as you’re doing the important prep work for the more-intricate dishes like the turkey. The appeal of this dish goes beyond its minimal degree of attentiveness; while you’re letting the Yeast Rolls do their thing, the nostalgic and delightful aroma of yeast will waft through your kitchen, making everyone feel at home at your Thanksgiving feast.

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The Basics of Homemade Pumpkin Pie

by in Recipes, November 1st, 2014

Pumpkin PieWhile the turkey often takes center stage on Thanksgiving, for the sweet tooths at the table, it’s likely all about the most-anticipated final course: dessert —  in particular, the rich, creamy pumpkin pie. With a buttery crust and spiced pumpkin filling, this tried-and-true indulgence in a holiday staple, and with the help of a go-to recipe, it’s one you can surely make easily at home. Learn the basics of Food Network Kitchen’s Pumpkin Pie recipe below, then check out the complete gallery for the rest of the how-to.

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Tailgate Chili — Down-Home Comfort

by in Recipes, October 31st, 2014

The Southeastern Conference is home to some of the best college football in the country, and with it, some of the most-fervent fans and most-passionate tailgating. Football in the South is a bit like religion. People get really worked up; I mean really worked up. And, to that end, tailgating in the South is extreme as well. At the University of Alabama, fans are allowed to start tailgate setup at 6 p.m. the Thursday before the Saturday game — and dismantled as late as noon the day after! At my alma mater, the University of Georgia, there is Bulldog Park; a luxury RV tailgating facility offers the owners access to a wide range of amenities plus game-day shuttles to the stadium! Foodwise, there’s everything from LSU, where folks have big pots of meaty gumbo bubbling on a propane cooker, to The Grove at Ole Miss, where folks are super-fancy and serve dishes of hors d’oeuvres that you might be more accustomed to seeing at a ladies’ luncheon. (The real reason the food is so ladylike is that there’s a limited amount of electricity, and open flames and propane are prohibited — something that might not be a bad idea, considering the amount of alcohol consumed while tailgating!)

Personally, I prefer less work when I get to the stadium, and I suggest slow-cooked dishes prepared ahead of time. The best dishes are those you can cook at home and then add the finishing touches to at the stadium. I think the perfect tailgate food just might be chili. It works well in the fall, because it’s hearty and warms you up in the cool weather. Read more