All Posts In News

Ice Cream That Changes Color When You Lick It and Other Frozen Innovations

by in News, August 11th, 2014

Ice Cream That Changes Color When You Lick ItNot only is ice cream about the best thing ever — and that’s not just summer talkin’ — it actually keeps getting better and better. Every year brings new ice cream innovations.

This summer, for instance, Cronut® creator Dominique Ansel teamed up with fashion designer Lisa Perry to bring the world an ice cream sundae in a can: a sealed, frozen chocolate-lined soup can filled with root-beer and stracciatella ice creams, mascarpone semifreddo, macerated cherries, honey marshmallows and mini cherry meringues. “Pop It!” reads the label of the limited-edition frozen treat, which was available at only one location and for only one day, earlier this month.

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Creator of Cronut is Back With Peanut Butter and Pretzel Lobster Tails

by , August 11th, 2014

The not-so-humble Cronut may have bought its creator, Dominique Ansel, a new hot tub or two, but that doesn’t mean this Prince of perfect pastry is standing still. His newest creation? A lobster tail that is heavy on the pretzel and peanut butter and not so heavy on the lobster.

The appropriately named Pretzel Lobster Tail is currently available at Ansel’s bakery in Manhattan, NYC. This lobster tail-shaped pretzel is filled to the brim with peanut butter and brittle candy. It comes served with a cup of whipped honey brown butter for dipping purposes and the whole thing is topped with sea salt. What it lacks in sea-based protein it more than makes up for in carby, peanut buttery goodness.

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Five Restaurant Menu Tricks (and How to Avoid Falling for Them)

by in News, August 8th, 2014

Five Restaurant Menu Tricks (and How to Avoid Falling for Them)Restaurants can be risky business ventures — just look at how frequently they come and go. So to make sure their eatery isn’t just another flash in the pan, some restaurateurs employ a few subtle tricks to get diners, once seated, to more readily part with their cash.

There’s the “free” salty snack (chips and salsa, anyone?) placed on your table before the meal to increase your thirst and compel you to order more pricey drinks. And then there’s the way your server painstakingly describes every ingredient in the evening’s specials, but declines to mention the price, knowing you may be too embarrassed to ask. And there’s the way your wine glass keeps getting topped off, so that you get to the bottom of the bottle halfway through your meal and may feel inclined to order another one.

But the stealthiest strategy of all may be the sly tweaks made to restaurant menus to get you to fork over more moolah than you may have intended. Recently The Guardian noted a few such tricks.

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The Secret to Grilling the Perfect Steak: Lava

by in News, August 7th, 2014

The Secret to Grilling the Perfect Steak: LavaWhen you’ve cooked steak using lightning (verdict: “tasted good though a little metallic”), built walk-in gin and tonic clouds (one blogger called them a “drunkard’s dream“), turned the roof of a high-end London department store into a boating lake with a waterfall and a “float-up bar,” and pushed jelly way, way past its previous limits, what do you do for an encore?

If you’re Sam Bompas and Harry Parr, you make a meaty meal over 2,100 degree F molten rock. In June, London-based Bompas & Parr, who describe themselves as “Jellymongers and Architectural Foodsmiths,” traveled to upstate New York to team up with Syracuse University art professor and lava expert Robert Wysocki to “see what happens when super-heated liquid rock meets an icy crevasse and a 10-oz rib eye” — and recorded and consumed the results.

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Wine: How to Store It, Pour It — and Enjoy!

by in Drinks, News, August 1st, 2014

Wine: How to Store It, Pour It and Enjoy!Americans may be drinking more wine these days than we used to — especially in Washington, D.C., where, it may not surprise you to learn, more wine is consumed per capita than in any other state or district. But that doesn’t mean we know how to properly store and pour it. At what temperature should it be served? How full should our wine glasses be? And are we really supposed to decant?

Here are a few rules of thumb:

Be Chill (But Not Too Chill) About Storage: Ideally, bottles of wine should be stored (preferably, though not necessarily, on their sides) in a cool, dark place — like a basement or closet, if not in a dedicated wine cooler — at temperatures between 45 and 65 degrees F, with 55 degrees F being the sweet spot. Exposing wine to temperatures above 70 degrees F could speed aging or even flatten out the flavors and aromas, Wine Spectator warns. It’s cool to keep wine in your kitchen fridge short term, but don’t leave it there for months on end, as the low temp could damage the corks and, in turn, the wine. Aim to avoid extreme temperature fluctuations and long-term exposure to bright lighting when storing, but don’t freak out if they happen, especially if you’re planning to drink the wine sooner rather than later.

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How to Plate Your Food Like a Pro

by in News, July 31st, 2014

How to Plate Your Food Like a ProWhen it comes to serving food, presentation may not be everything — there’s taste to consider, after all — but studies have shown it can have a surprisingly big impact on how the foods we prepare are perceived. When we cook and plate to please the eye, as it happens, we also please the palete.

This week’s news that Red Lobster, in order “to be seen as a purveyor of quality seafood,” would stack food “higher on plates, as is the style at fancier restaurants,” as the Associated Press put it, brings that point home. Whether arranging the same food — fish, rice and vegetables — vertically, rather than spread out on the plate, will boost the seafood chain’s bottom line remains to be seen. Still, you may find in it the impetus to experiment with your own meal presentation.

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Which Is Better: Pie or Cake?

by in News, July 30th, 2014

Which Is Better: Pie or Cake?Dessert confession: I am not a pie person.

Unless it’s Key lime, I can easily pass pie by, even if my disinterest in crusts and cobblers containing apple, cherry, blueberry, pumpkin or (shudder) mincemeat deeply offends my pie-baking mother-in-law. So if you’re serving pie a la mode, just hand me the a la mode, please. But if there’s cake, feel free to give me the biggest piece — and then another.

I am a cake person.

It turns out the world may fall into two distinct groups: pie people and cake people. Recently, representatives from both camps squared off in a battle over bragging rights on Vox.com: “Is cake the great American dessert? Or is it pie?” the site wondered.

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How to Shop Like a Chef (Hint: Buy Generic)

by in News, July 29th, 2014

How to Shop Like a Chef It’s not always clear, as you’re standing in the supermarket aisle and feeling overwhelmed by a shelf crowded with different versions of the same product, when it’s worth reaching for a recognizable name brand and when you can save yourself a few hard-earned bucks and buy generic without sacrificing quality. Next time you’re in that situation, you may want to ask yourself, “What would a chef do?”

In a follow-up to a recent study on the over-the-counter-medicine-buying habits of doctors and pharmacists, a group of researchers at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business and at Tilburg University in the Netherlands has revealed which foods chefs and other food-prep pros buy generic more frequently than the general consumer, and for which food products they tend to shell out for a name brand.

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The Jerky Revolution

by in News, Product Reviews, July 29th, 2014

JerkyRemember that beef jerky you got at the gas station during road trips? The stuff that’s loaded with sodium and has what you would imagine the texture of dog treats to be? Well, it has come a long way since then, becoming a bona fide healthy snack for protein lovers. With less sodium, better flavors and almost nothing unnatural about it, artisan jerky is on the rise.

Just one ounce of the leading brand’s beef jerky can have almost 800 milligrams of sodium, while new brands that concentrate on a more-natural process usually stay around 400 milligrams for the same-size serving (some as low as 300). Besides the fact that these new brands won’t make you feel like you’re gnawing on a salt block, they’ve also got an ingredient list you can fully pronounce. It’s refreshing to see words like “garlic” and “sesame seeds” in place of words like “flavorings” and “monosodium glutamate.”

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Orange Juice Drinkers May Soon Feel the Squeeze

by in News, July 28th, 2014

Orange Juice Drinkers May Soon Feel the SqueezeIs your morning cup of orange juice in danger? It might be. And your grapefruit too.

A bacterial disease known as citrus greening (AKA Huanglongbing or HLB or yellow dragon disease) is threatening America’s citrus crops. Named for the way it turns citrus fruits green, misshapen and bitter tasting, and thus unsuitable for sale or consumption as either fresh fruit or juice, citrus greening poses no direct threat to humans or animals. For the trees themselves, however, it is devastating — and ultimately deadly. There is, as of now, no known cure.

Though the disease likely originated in China in the early 1900s and has long wreaked havoc abroad, citrus greening wasn’t detected in the United States until 2005, when it was spotted in Florida. By 2008 it affected almost every citrus-growing county in Florida, and it has continued to spread broadly and rapidly, primarily via a gnat-sized insect called the Asian citrus psyllid, which carries the disease from tree to tree as it feeds.

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