All Posts In News

Your Summer Gin and Tonic, Suitable for Scooping

by in News, May 30th, 2015

Jude's Ice CreamThere are those who consider the perfect summer refresher to be a nice, cool gin and tonic — and then there are those who would argue that it’s a big dish of ice cream.

A new product is uniquely positioned to end the debate and bring those disparate groups together: gin and tonic ice cream.

A result of a collaboration between two U.K. companies, London distillery Sipsmith and Hampshire-based Jude’s ice cream, the limited-edition summer offering combines Sipsmith London Dry Gin’s botanical elements, including juniper berries, citrus peel, licorice root and ground almonds, with tonic water and a hint of lemon, to evoke the flavor of your bartender’s best G&T, the Telegraph reports.

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Science Knows Why You Crave Bloody Marys on Airplanes

by in Drinks, News, May 27th, 2015

Science Knows Why You Crave Bloody Marys on AirplanesThat craving for tomato juice or a Bloody Mary that comes over you in airplanes, as perhaps nowhere else? Blame the roar of the engines.

Cornell University food scientists say airplane noise, which tends to hover around 85 decibels, can affect travelers’ taste buds — suppressing their taste for sweet stuff and boosting the taste of umami-rich foods like tomato juice.

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Show Up for Your Reservation at This Hong Kong Hot Spot, or You Will Pay — a Lot

by in News, Restaurants, May 24th, 2015

Show Up for Your Reservation at This Hong Kong Hot Spot, or You Will Pay — a LotLots of diners do it: make an advance reservation to eat at a well-regarded restaurant and then, when the date rolls around, opt not to go. Maybe they decide to eat somewhere else. Maybe they have multiple reservations, figuring they’ll go where they feel when the moment hits. Maybe something unavoidable comes up. Sometimes, they don’t even bother to cancel.

But if you make a reservation at the Hong Kong restaurant Sushi Shikon, a three-Michelin-star establishment, you’ll probably want to show up to eat there. If you cancel on the day of your reservation, try to change the date, don’t show up, show up with someone missing from your party or arrive more than an hour late, the restaurant will charge you 3,500 Hong Kong dollars ($452). Even if you give the restaurant a little notice, but cancel less than 72 hours of your seating time, Sushi Shikon will charge you HK $1,250 ($161). In fact, even if you wait just 24 hours from the time you confirm your reservation to cancel, but do so more than 72 hours before your seating time, you’ll still owe a fee of HK $500 ($65), although, according to the South China Morning Post, you are allowed to change the date of your reservation without penalty within that time frame.

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98 Flawless Cubes of Food Will Soothe Your Perfectionist Soul

by in News, May 22nd, 2015

98 Flawless Cubes of Food Will Soothe Your Perfectionist SoulThe kiwi seems clear enough. And the pomegranate and the papaya are unmistakable. Unless, of course, I’m mistaken.

I have hunch those are peppers. And … cabbage, is that you? Mushroom? Cauliflower? Corn? Watermelon? And what kind of fish is that? Or, wait, is that even fish?

Food may never have looked at once so exposed and so elemental as it does in “Cubes,” an image created by Amsterdam-based visual artists Lernert & Sander (full names: Lernert Engelberts and Sander Plug) and commissioned by Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant for a food-themed photography special feature. (You can buy a C-print or a poster on the artists’ website.)

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A Savory Lobster-Stuffed Doughnut? Sweet!

by in News, May 21st, 2015

A Savory Lobster-Stuffed Doughnut? Sweet!Eating lobster generally consists of cracking a shell, fishing out the pretty pink-and-white meat, dipping it in butter and popping it into your mouth. It does not usually mean biting into a doughnut.

But Kane’s Handcrafted Donuts a Boston-area doughnut destination that recently expanded to its second location, in Boston’s Financial District, is now making a savory “dowich” filled with lobster. How New England! (Kane’s also makes a dowich stuffed with braised beef, and the bakery’s website mentions pulled pork and jalapeno, chicken salad, and Philly cheesesteak dowiches, if those sound more like your thing.)

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Pay-What-You-Want Restaurants: What They Are and How They Work

by in News, Restaurants, May 17th, 2015

Pay-What-You-Want Restaurants: What They Are and What You Need to KnowYou, like me, may not have paid much attention to the particulars of pay-what-you-want restaurants. Perhaps you’re vaguely aware that they exist, but you’re unsure of how, precisely, the whole sliding-scale, honor-system concept plays out when put into practice.

Helpfully, Eater has published a blog post called How Do Pay-What-You-Want Restaurants Work?, which explains how eateries like SAME Café, a “pay what you can” restaurant in Denver, pay the bills even though not all customers are paying full price for their meals.

Here are four key facts to take away (no payment necessary):

1. Most pay-what-you-want (PWYW) restaurants look like other regular eateries — with tables, menus, ways to order and places to pay. The difference is that you can pay the amount that you are capable of paying, if you cannot afford to pay full fare, or even work (helping to wash dishes or prep meals, say) in exchange for your food. You can also pay more than the value of your meal, to help defray the cost of those who may need to pay less.

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Where Do People Eat Most When They’re Traveling for Work?

by in News, May 14th, 2015

nullWhere do travelers eat when business calls them away from their desks? Many of us grab a bite wherever it’s convenient — but more of us expense Starbucks than any other restaurant, according to a new quarterly report by the expense-management-software company Certify revealing how business people spend their company cash when they’re traveling for work.

Starbucks, which constituted 5.32 percent of corporate dining cash, with an average of about $12.22 spent per visit, topped Certify’s list of most-expensed restaurants. McDonald’s was second, taking in 2.56 percent of eating expenditures, with an average of $7.91 spent per visit. In third place was Panera Bread, which, though it constituted just 1.81 percent of expenses, showed an average of $41.35 spent per visit.

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Dinners Feed Instagrammers’ Hunger for the Perfect Shot

by in News, May 12th, 2015

Photographing FoodHere’s a cool concept: Israeli wine company Carmel Wineries, looking to capture the attention of the Instagram food-porn-posting generation, is sponsoring a strong of photo-courting fancy dinners called Foodography (no relation to Cooking Channel’s Foodography).

At the events, diners — initially members of Israel’s food media elite (chefs, bloggers, journalists, critics), though now open to those willing to pay $155/hour — are treated to a series of photogenic dishes, created by Chef Meir Adoni of Tel Aviv’s Catit restaurant group, at a five-course meal. Each dish was designed around “the color and concept of red wine,” according to PSFK.

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Nighttime Food Obsessions? Blame Your Brain

by in News, May 11th, 2015

Nighttime Food Obsessions? Blame Your BrainNighttime food cravings? We have all been there — those moments when you’re burning the midnight oil trying to finish a project or watching a little late-night TV and all of a sudden can’t get the thought of a big bowl of ice cream or dish of salty snacks out of your mind, no matter what you do. It’s like a crazy itch that sneaks up on you, demanding to be scratched.

Turns out, there may be a biological underpinning for those after-hours food obsessions.

A study recently published in the journal Brain Imaging and Behavior used brain scans and pictures of both high-energy and low-energy foods to track how participants’ neural responses to the food images differed depending on the time of day, measuring them in the morning and at night. The study, conducted by researchers at Brigham Young University, examined both hunger and preoccupation with food.

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Playing with Your Food Is OK When It Turns Out Like This

by in News, May 10th, 2015

Playing with Your Food Is OK When It Turns Out Like ThisIn a sense, cooking — whether or not you follow a recipe — is a form of making order out of chaos. But no one makes order out of a random assembly of ingredients like Seattle-based freelance photographer Brittany Wright.

Wright’s Instagram page, which features beautifully satisfying images of fruits, vegetables, spices, baked goods and other kitchen staples arranged by color into “food gradients,” has been getting a lot of attention lately. As of late this week, it had 83,700 followers. People are clearly responding to Wright’s rainbow-like photos, as well as her meticulous, orderly approach.

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