All Posts In News

Supermarket Chic, Water Into Wine and a Food Personality Quiz

by in News, March 8th, 2014

Supermarket Chic, Water Into Wine and MoreAttention, grocery shoppers: The fashion world now thinks you’re cool. Chanel designer Karl Lagerfeld has a history of creating over-the-top settings for his Paris fashion shows — an airplane, an art museum. This year he built a faux supermarket stacked with brightly colored goods labeled with Chanel-inspired names — Coco Chanel Coco Pops, anyone? — which models plopped into Chanel-branded shopping baskets. (We’d like to see those couture catwalkers try this.) “Fashion editors posed with shopping trolleys amid this Warholian fashion extravaganza,” the Guardian reports, adding that a full-on riot broke out when show attendees briefly believed they could take the cleverly labeled goods home. [Guardian]

What food are you? The line at the top of Buzzfeed’s What Food Matches Your Personality quiz — “God, you’re such a burrito” — made us laugh, but only until we diligently answered all the questions and were labeled a burrito ourselves. “Here comes the burritoooooooo! (That’s you.),” the results jeered. “You’re a Renaissance man/woman. You’ve got a little bit of everything. And everybody better watch out because your flour tortilla is homemade.” Not satisfied, we took the quiz again and totally changed our answers. (Whatever, we’re such a burrito.) This time, we were cheese: “You go well with almost anything … and … make a lot of people happy.” Yeah, that’s better. [Buzzfeed]

Read more

Computer-Driven Food Truck Eats, Ice Cream Stilettos and a Restaurant-Smashing Wave

by in News, March 6th, 2014

Computer-Driven Food Truck Eats and MoreChef Watson is on wheels. In New York City, you can find food trucks that purvey pretty much anything you can think of: Crepes? Curried goat? Schnitzel? Edamame? Ecuadoran fish soup? Check, check, check, check and check. But now, roaming the country (last week in Las Vegas; this weekend in Austin for SXSW Interactive), there’s a food truck that sells exotic delicacies that neither you nor anyone else would probably ever imagine. That’s because the dishes its chefs are whipping up have been conceived by a supercomputer (remember Watson, who triumphed on Jeopardy! a few years back?), to bring together ingredients in unusual combinations too complex for mere humans to come up with. The IBM researchers who’ve teamed with New York’s Institute of Culinary Education to make the truck happen call the process Computational Creativity (or Cognitive Cooking). Diners sampling dishes like Baltic apple pie — which includes pork loin, apples and garlic chips — apparently call it mind-bendingly delish. [NPR's The Salt]

What’s in a name? Ever wonder how cobb salad, oysters Rockefeller and bananas Foster got their names? The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel fills you in on the origins of these and other food monikers. But just so you know: Chef Bob Cobb’s surname was bestowed on the salad he made from leftovers at Hollywood’s Brown Derby Restaurant in the 1920s. Oysters Rockefeller’s buttery sauce, when it was created in 1899, was thought to evoke the richness of ultra-wealthy oil baron John D. Rockefeller. And the famous banana dish, which made its debut in New Orleans in the 1950s, was named in honor of a humble restaurant patron. [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]

Read more

Ramen: Ready for a Close-Up

by in News, March 5th, 2014

Ramen: Ready for a Close-UpIf you still think of ramen as those super-salty, just-add-water packaged noodles your roommate — OK, you — ate way too much of in college, you may want to get out more. Or at the very least, you should watch this video of Chef Bradley Miller’s heartfelt tribute to the food he’d choose for his last bite on Earth: “a big steaming porky deliciousness bowl of miso ramen.”

During the last few years in New York, ramen shops have popped up with the sudden ubiquity of Starbucks, but instead of sipping pricey venti lattes, their hipster clientele, barely visible behind steamy windows, devour headily fragrant, artfully prepared, and delightfully inexpensive Japanese broth and noodles.

Read more

An Oscar-Worthy Shout-Out for Gumbo and Pie

by in News, March 3rd, 2014

Food Network Magazine's Vegetable GumboAnd the award for the Best Food Moment of this year’s Oscars goes to …

No, not Academy Awards host Ellen DeGeneres’ pizza delivery to the stars, funny (and real) though it was, but rather to Best Actor winner Matthew McConaughey‘s mid-acceptance speech shout-out to his late father, who he said was looking down proudly from above surrounded by his favorite foods: “a big pot of gumbo,” “a lemon meringue pie” and “a cold can of Miller Lite.”

“And he’s dancing right now,” the Dallas Buyers Club star said, breaking into a little dad shuffle.

You can watch the father-food tribute by clicking play on this video (find it around 2:04), then set to creating your own McConaughey-inspired piece of heaven by cooking up some gumbo (perhaps a Shrimp Gumbo, a Louisiana Seafood Gumbo, a Chicken and Andouille Sausage Gumbo or Food Network Magazine’s Vegetable Gumbo (pictured above) — or one you can make in your slow cooker) and lemon meringue pie (Alton Brown’s recipe is a classic, and Trisha Yearwood’s is so simple it’s almost magic).

Read more

What the Stars Will Eat on Oscar Night

by in News, March 2nd, 2014

Hollywood Sign CupcakesOn Oscar night, as you reach for the chip bowl — or perhaps the gloriously delicious Hollywood Sign Cupcakes (pictured above), Red Carpet Cocktails and other award-winning eats and healthy treats — kick back on the couch in your most finger-food-feast-forgiving pants, spare a thought for those hungry stars shuffling across the stage, who have been working hard for weeks to fit into those couture gowns and tuxedos.

Yeah, OK, hold your pity. They’ll be eating just as magnificently as you’d imagine at the Academy’s official after party. On this year’s Governors Ball menu, created by Wolfgang Puck with chef Matt Bencivenga, you’ll find everything from pizza, burgers, grilled cheese and Smoked Salmon Oscar® Matzo (comfort foods suitable for winners who were played offstage before they had a chance to thank their agent’s pet Chihuahua and nominees who didn’t nab a statuette alike) to high-concept desserts like Licorice and Chocolate Parfait, Caramelized Tobacco Leaves (Gluten Free), Caramel Garden, Coffee Soil, Chocolate Malted Tree, Fleur de Sel and Strawberry Consomme, Angel Food Cake, Olive Oil Sorbet.

Read more

Dig In: Hawaii’s Hot Spot, Epic Food Fails and DIY Pop Tarts

by in News, March 1st, 2014

Homemade Pop TartsWho said a restaurant had to break the bank to be good? You can keep your fancy-pants gazillion-dollar-a-plate eateries — or at least keep diligently saving up to one day try them. The number one restaurant on Yelp’s just-released list of the Top 100 Places to Eat in the U.S., based on its community reviews, is a little hole-in-the-wall joint in a condo community in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, called Da Poke Shack, where a meal will run you around $10. The food — “always fresh … never frozen,” its website boasts — is served into disposable containers with ice cream scoops. Yes. [Yelp via Slate]

If only it counted as exercise: Kitschy kitchen accessory alert for ‘za-loving cycling buffs (and those who long to be buff cyclists). The Fixie Pizza Cutter, by DOIY, designed to look like a fixed-gear bike, complete with handlebars, seat, frame and two wheels sharp enough to slice through crust, is the talk of the hungry hipster set. It comes in two color combos: Watermelon (mint and pink) and Bumblebee (black and yellow), and retails for around $25. Alas, it’s not yet being shipped to the U.S., but here’s hoping it rolls this way soon. [Toxel]

Read more

Trending: Toast? Yes. Plus: 5 Ways to Embrace Its Simplicity

by in News, February 14th, 2014

ToastWhat says good morning like a thick slice of toast with melty butter tucking into each bit, crumb and bite? Food nerds on Facebook and Twitter a couple weeks back spread around an article about fancy toast in and around San Francisco, making mouths water at breakfast tables ever since. Describing a $3, $4 and higher pricetags per slice at chic diners and restos, the article and a few that followed it prompted the question: Is toast worth it? (For some the pricetags are a headscratcher; others, not so much.) Set aside any debate about whether toast is going artisanal on the West Coast or elsewhere and who started it, though, because the best toast you’ve ever had can be made, of course, right at home.

Read more

The New FoodNetwork.com Is Here!

by in News, January 23rd, 2014

FoodNetwork.com Home Page

It’s ready! We are so excited to introduce FoodNetwork.com’s freshest look, with all-new, improved ways of discovering the best recipes, videos, tips, restaurants, chefs and shows around. After months of planning and plotting, testing and tweaking, our cleaner, smarter, easy-to-browse site is ready for prime time.

“We’re thrilled to roll out our rebuilt sites for desktop and mobile this week,” said Angela Moore, vice president of Food Network’s digital group. “FoodNetwork.com’s new design, navigation, search and overall experience enable our audience to find the content and tools they need to make their lives — and meals! — easier, more enriched and more fun.”

Here’s a quick tour of the new look and feel:

Read more

Za’atar — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, January 14th, 2014

Za'atar - The Next Best Thing You Never Ateby Jacob Schiffman

When I lived in Israel my junior year abroad in college, I started noticing that a lot of my favorite foods had a nutty, floral flavor I hadn’t seen before. I found out it was a Middle Eastern spice blend made of woody herbs (usually thyme and oregano, but traditionally hyssop), sumac and sesame seeds. There I saw it mostly on hummus or on flatbreads, but now I love putting it on roasted vegetables or fish (with a bit of honey), grilled chicken or baked eggs at breakfast. There are regional varieties of za’atar (Jordanian has more sumac and Israeli sometimes includes dill); I like the Israeli style, probably because that’s the first one I tried. Whichever one you prefer, let me know what you like to eat it on.

Find it: Look for it in most good grocery stores and any specialty spice shop.

What’s Next in Food Trends for 2014

by in News, December 30th, 2013


The editors, cooks and food-curious experts at Food Network Kitchens are always looking for what’s fun, delicious and next. It’s become a given that food fans, chefs and media types of all sorts look ahead and share their expectations. From their glimpse into the 2014 crystal ball, here’s a not-so-serious, definitely unscientific look at the food trends seen as up-and-coming.

“It’s kind of a wild time in food, full of contradictions,” says Katherine Alford, SVP of Culinary at Food Network. “On one hand people are more adventurous than ever. They’re eating Korean and Szechwan, seeking out crazy-hot ghost peppers, and mixing and matching to make outlandish hybrids of comfort foods. But that’s all balanced with a growing demand for food that matters more to our bodies’ well-being and the planet’s well-being, too.” Recently and still coming, you can see an eclectic mix of comfort food and healthy food, plus local picks as well as far-flung favorites. “In the past few years we’ve upped our spices, eaten more veggies and grown to expect some playfulness on the plate,” Alford says. “With all that, next year I’m keeping my eye on what’s cooking right here in America’s heartland. There is real excitement in the fresh voices cooking there. As for 2014, we hope what we found is inspiring with a little wishful thinking mixed in.” Tell us what you’re looking forward to as the next delicious food on your table in the new year.

Keep reading

...10...121314...20...