All Posts In News

Trending: Toast? Yes. Plus: 5 Ways to Embrace Its Simplicity

by in News, February 14th, 2014

ToastWhat says good morning like a thick slice of toast with melty butter tucking into each bit, crumb and bite? Food nerds on Facebook and Twitter a couple weeks back spread around an article about fancy toast in and around San Francisco, making mouths water at breakfast tables ever since. Describing a $3, $4 and higher pricetags per slice at chic diners and restos, the article and a few that followed it prompted the question: Is toast worth it? (For some the pricetags are a headscratcher; others, not so much.) Set aside any debate about whether toast is going artisanal on the West Coast or elsewhere and who started it, though, because the best toast you’ve ever had can be made, of course, right at home.

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The New FoodNetwork.com Is Here!

by in News, January 23rd, 2014

FoodNetwork.com Home Page

It’s ready! We are so excited to introduce FoodNetwork.com’s freshest look, with all-new, improved ways of discovering the best recipes, videos, tips, restaurants, chefs and shows around. After months of planning and plotting, testing and tweaking, our cleaner, smarter, easy-to-browse site is ready for prime time.

“We’re thrilled to roll out our rebuilt sites for desktop and mobile this week,” said Angela Moore, vice president of Food Network’s digital group. “FoodNetwork.com’s new design, navigation, search and overall experience enable our audience to find the content and tools they need to make their lives — and meals! — easier, more enriched and more fun.”

Here’s a quick tour of the new look and feel:

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Za’atar — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, January 14th, 2014

Za'atar - The Next Best Thing You Never Ateby Jacob Schiffman

When I lived in Israel my junior year abroad in college, I started noticing that a lot of my favorite foods had a nutty, floral flavor I hadn’t seen before. I found out it was a Middle Eastern spice blend made of woody herbs (usually thyme and oregano, but traditionally hyssop), sumac and sesame seeds. There I saw it mostly on hummus or on flatbreads, but now I love putting it on roasted vegetables or fish (with a bit of honey), grilled chicken or baked eggs at breakfast. There are regional varieties of za’atar (Jordanian has more sumac and Israeli sometimes includes dill); I like the Israeli style, probably because that’s the first one I tried. Whichever one you prefer, let me know what you like to eat it on.

Find it: Look for it in most good grocery stores and any specialty spice shop.

What’s Next in Food Trends for 2014

by in News, December 30th, 2013


The editors, cooks and food-curious experts at Food Network Kitchens are always looking for what’s fun, delicious and next. It’s become a given that food fans, chefs and media types of all sorts look ahead and share their expectations. From their glimpse into the 2014 crystal ball, here’s a not-so-serious, definitely unscientific look at the food trends seen as up-and-coming.

“It’s kind of a wild time in food, full of contradictions,” says Katherine Alford, SVP of Culinary at Food Network. “On one hand people are more adventurous than ever. They’re eating Korean and Szechwan, seeking out crazy-hot ghost peppers, and mixing and matching to make outlandish hybrids of comfort foods. But that’s all balanced with a growing demand for food that matters more to our bodies’ well-being and the planet’s well-being, too.” Recently and still coming, you can see an eclectic mix of comfort food and healthy food, plus local picks as well as far-flung favorites. “In the past few years we’ve upped our spices, eaten more veggies and grown to expect some playfulness on the plate,” Alford says. “With all that, next year I’m keeping my eye on what’s cooking right here in America’s heartland. There is real excitement in the fresh voices cooking there. As for 2014, we hope what we found is inspiring with a little wishful thinking mixed in.” Tell us what you’re looking forward to as the next delicious food on your table in the new year.

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Shichimi Togarashi — The Next Best Thing You Never Ate

by in News, December 17th, 2013

Shichimi Togarashiby Susan Vu of Food Network Kitchens

I used to work in a Japanese restaurant and everyone there put shichimi togarashi (a Japanese mix of seven ingredients: two kinds each of chile flakes and sesame seeds, then orange zest, ginger, hemp seeds and seaweed) on everything — even french fries. It’s such a good, all-around condiment. My three favorite food components are heat, acid and crunch, and between the chiles, orange and sesame seeds, this seasoning touches upon all three of them. I put it on roast potatoes right when they come out of the oven, I love to toss blistered shishito peppers with it and a squeeze of lime juice, and it’s a great finisher for seafood too.

Look for shichimi togarashi at Japanese grocery stores or order it online.

You Can Eat the Apple Core, Really + the Best Burger Buns of 2013

by in Community, News, November 22nd, 2013

ApplesThe Atlantic: Rethink throwing away the core of your next apple. News is that it’s perfectly fine to eat.

The Salt: Not just for brewing that morning cup of joe anymore, you can steam, poach and grill with your coffeemaker. A retired photographer in Oregon creates and sends recipes for home-cooked coffeemaker meals to her nephew deployed in Afghanistan.

BurgerBusiness: For burger enthusiasts, 2013 was the year of the bun. Here’s a recap of this year’s craziest trends, including the infamous ramen burger.

Slate: Is Nebraska the new foodie destination? For a truly authentic farm-to-table experience, the Cornhusker State may be the next spot to check out.

Eatocracy: Find out why you shouldn’t panic about the Butterball shortage.

Behind the Scenes: FoodNetwork.com Upgrade in Progress!

by in News, November 13th, 2013

FoodNetwork.com Update Sneak PeekHere on FN Dish, fans get a daily helping of the latest popular recipes from FoodNetwork.com, plus news and updates about favorite chefs, shows and restaurants. Just a few weeks ago we rolled out an all-new Recipe Box feature to help you save crave-worthy Food Network recipes (plus your own personal ones and those from other websites) and a shopping-list tool that stays synced no matter which device you’re using, from the kitchen to the living room to the market and back again. Now, for the latest look behind the curtain, we’re sharing a sneak peek of FoodNetwork.com’s upcoming website upgrade.

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Introducing FoodNetwork.com’s Newest Feature: Recipe Box

by in Community, News, November 4th, 2013

My Recipe BoxWhen you’re perusing FoodNetwork.com‘s vast collection of recipes, you may very well come across towering cakes and comforting casseroles, simple soups and showstopping steaks, and centerpiece roast chickens and satisfying cookies — all in one visit. But with so many tasty how-tos for the taking, how are you to remember which recipes in particular you know you want to make, and how do you keep them organized? Enter FoodNetwork.com’s newest tool: Recipe Box.

It’s no longer necessary to print out page after page of recipes, then staple them together and stash them away in a drawer. With Recipe Box, not only can you sort your favorite recipes by dish, cuisine, meal type, menu, chef and more categories, but you also can create shopping lists based on any or all of your preferred recipes and access them from both Food Network’s website and your mobile phone.

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Connected: Wired Magazine Digs Up Tasty Food Data with FoodNetwork.com

by in News, October 23rd, 2013

Wired Pie ChartIt’s a big month at Food Network. As the network celebrates its 20th birthday and its fans gear up for the year’s biggest food holiday, Thanksgiving, its website took the spotlight in Wired’s November issue. Wired’s editors looked at the site’s nearly 50,000 recipes and its almost 1 million comments to answer, once and for all, questions about what foods Americans are cooking and how. With kid-friendly classics like hamburgers and pasta with meatballs to dressed-up dishes like risotto, creme brulee and souffles — and seemingly every imaginable meal in between — FoodNetwork.com’s database offered the ultimate one-stop resource for number-crunching of the recipe sort. What resulted was an impressive eight-page spread: one of the most exhaustive data collections to date and a better understanding of what we’re putting on the family table.

Just in time for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, Wired investigated one of the most celebrated slivers of FoodNetwork.com — Thanksgiving Central — to offer “The Only Thanksgiving Guide You Want.” This course-by-course breakdown encompasses not only deliciously simple seasonal recipes and how-tos to help you shop for these dishes, but also interactive charts that allow for easy decision-making when selecting between the many mashed potato, stuffing, gravy and pie offerings available. Just take your pick among recipes that require “Marathon Shopping” and “Slaving at the Stove,” or opt for the “Labors of Love” or something “Quick and Easy,” and serve up a holiday-worthy feast in a flash.

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Alton Brown Is Bringing Back the Bow Tie

by in Food Network Chef, News, October 21st, 2013

Alton BrownHe may be a famed food-science guru, the longtime host of Iron Chef America and a revered judge-mentor on Food Network Star, but for the first time, Alton Brown is stepping out of the kitchen and designing something other than food. In partnership with hook + Albert, a brand specializing in men’s accessories, Alton’s launched an all-new line of bow ties called The Alton Brown Collection.

The Alton Brown Collection“Basically, these are ties I wanted for myself but couldn’t find,” Alton told Food Network of his idea to begin this venture. He’s been a frequent wearer of bow ties for years, but until now, they’ve been designed and styled by others. This look, however, is wholly his own.

Pieces of The Alton Brown Collection include neutral-colored blacks and whites, plus bright hues like blues, oranges and reds, but what makes the bow ties unique is their patterns and textures. They feature a mix of stripes, specks and plaids, and all come together in harmonious looks. “They’re eccentric but wearable and very clothes-friendly,” Alton explains. “What we’ve done with this collection is hopefully made bow ties that will even appeal to guys who have never given bow ties a thought.”

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