All Posts In In Season

5 Light Squash Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, December 5th, 2012

Slow-Cooker Squash Stew
fall festAfter the endless pies and casseroles of Thanksgiving, think about giving yourself a quasi cleanse before the holidays — all the while incorporating seasonal favorites. This week, we’re all about winter squash. And lucky for us, the winter squash category includes some of the most popular ones, like butternut, acorn and kabocha. It turns out that squash is low-cal on its own and these recipes don’t contain a trace of butter or cream.

Food Network Magazine’s Spiced Squash With Yogurt Dressing boasts spiced, roasted kabocha squash drizzled with a low-fat yogurt sauce and pomegranate seeds.

Slow cookers are a lifesaver when it comes to keeping things balanced without forsaking flavor. Food Network Magazine’s Slow-Cooker Squash Stew (pictured above) comprises butternut squash, chickpeas and Swiss chard. That sprinkle of Parmesan, however, is up to you.

For a fresh take on fall produce, look to Marcela Valladolid’s recipe for Food Network Magazine, Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Tangerine-Rosemary Vinaigrette. In between bites of butternut squash come juicy tangerines, dried cranberries and spinach. Ina Garten’s Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Warm Cider Vinaigrette blends apple cider and cider vinegar for a tangy contrast to squash roasted with maple syrup.

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10 Standout Cauliflower Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, November 28th, 2012

Roasted Cauliflower With Dates and Pine Nuts
fall festCauliflower proves the perfect backdrop to all your favorite fall — or otherwise — flavors. What it lacks in color these snow-white florets make up for in versatility and texture. Do what you will with them: steam or roast, fry or purée. In the end, it’s an in-season veggie worth talking about.

This fall, make moves on some of Food Network’s best cauliflower recipes.

Like potatoes, cauliflower does well when cheese enters the mix. Try it out with Bobby Flay’s creamy Cauliflower-Goat Cheese Gratin, which comes laced with Monterey Jack and grated Parmesan as well. For a subtler sprinkle, make Giada De Laurentiis’ Roasted Cauliflower With Parmesan and Pancetta with an decidedly Italian influence.

For bold Middle Eastern sides that would go well with charred steaks or lamb chops, listen up. Claire Robinson’s Roasted Cauliflower With Dates and Pine Nuts recipe for Food Network Magazine (pictured above) works up a nice browning on the florets, and Anne Burrell’s Spice-Roasted Cauliflower and Jerusalem Artichokes recipe for Food Network Magazine brightens up any plate it hits.

For the calorie cutters among us, Food Network Magazine’s Cauliflower With Tomatoes is just the thing. This side breathes flavor with healthy additions like lemon juice, cilantro and loads of spices.

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Best Carrot Sides for Thanksgiving — Fall Fest

by in Holidays, In Season, November 7th, 2012

Coriander Glazed Carrots
fall festCarrots may be your go-to zip baggie snack, but there’s something to be said for graduating this in-season veggie to your dinner table. As we compile our Thanksgiving wish lists, look no further for this year’s best carrot sides.

For a killer side that’s as worthy as your prize-winning stuffing, there’s no need to completely change the face of this root veggie. Instead, simplicity is key.

Sunny Anderson prepares her Honey Glazed Carrots with just butter, honey and lemon, while Ina Garten’s Sauteed Carrots and Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Carrots are even simpler.

Claire Robinson’s Baby Carrots With Sweet Ginger Butter look to crystallized ginger for a sweet and fresh flavor. For a rustic side that’s one of her favorite comfort foods, Alex Guarnaschelli makes her Brown Sugared Carrots with molasses, rosemary and dark brown sugar. For the brightest recipe of all, go for Food Network Magazine’s Coriander-Glazed Carrots (pictured above), which come laced with orange and lime juices, cilantro and brown sugar too.

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Bright Pepper Bites — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 31st, 2012

Skillet Pork and Peppers
fall festThere’s so much to love about bell peppers. They turn a tub of hummus into a well-rounded snack. They char on the grill in no time at all. They can be stuffed to the rim and roasted till supple. Bell peppers manage to breathe life and color into all of our favorites, and we thank them for that.

For a bell pepper with a sweet-as-can-be disposition, look to the ruby-red variety. For a subtle and pleasantly bitter flavor, green is the pepper for you. And for something that falls in between, it’s all about the orange and the yellow.

Untouched bell peppers may come down with a cold crunch, but they also make for a comforting fall dish when cooked down until soft and sweet.

Settle into a big bowl of Creamy Red Pepper Soup with a dollop of mascarpone to start, but make sure to have a slice of ultra-crusty bread on hand for dipping benefits.

Now let’s talk hearty mains. Food Network Magazine’s Skillet Pork and Peppers (pictured above) and Broiled Chicken With Peppers rely on the oven for moist meat and a crispy façade.

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Primping Up Pumpkin — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 24th, 2012

pumpkin roll cheesecake
fall festYou’ve got your go-to pumpkin pie recipe stored away in the family vault and your world-famous pumpkin bread recipe hidden underneath your pillow. Who can blame you? These desserts are as fundamental to fall as apple picking, pumpkin patching or mulled apple cider drinking. We wouldn’t dare threaten all that’s tried-and-true, but there’s something to be said for trying something new with pumpkin this season.

Now that pumpkins are in season, go ahead and skip the can. Instead, grab a few sugar pumpkins, roast, puree and then cook ‘em down with loads of spices. Homemade Pumpkin Puree is freezable, so there’s no excuse for not having the fresh stuff on hand. According to HGTV Gardens, the longer a pumpkin rests off the vine, the sweeter it will become — so try and cure your pumpkins for two or more weeks before using.

When it comes to savory, pumpkin soup proves a fall mainstay. Rather than opting for a purely pumpkin blend, add an unexpected component with Rachael Ray’s Pumpkin Soup With Chili Cran-Apple Relish.

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Top 12 Lettuce Wraps — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 17th, 2012

grilled pork lettuce wraps
fall festNow that we’re really pushing into fall, lettuce probably isn’t necessarily the most on-your-radar type of seasonal produce. Fall is the time for cozying up to butternut squash soup and just-out-of-the-oven pumpkin bread, is it not? Well, believe it or not, it turns out this is the time to get your lettuce fix since the leafy green is in season.

According to HGTV Gardens, lettuce is one of the best-dressed vegetables at the market. Varieties come in a cornucopia of shades: green, red, purple, yellow, as well as variegated and mottled combinations.

Just because lettuce is on the must-eat list doesn’t mean we’re talking ice-cold salads. Nope, this week we’re all about one thing: lettuce wraps. In this rendering, lettuce is foundational. It packs the same hand-held functionality as a taco, and works as a stellar party appetizer or light lunch.

There are many ways to make your lettuce wraps, whether you’re going the veggie or the meaty route. Here’s just a taste.

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Fall Into Turnips — Fall Fest

by in In Season, October 10th, 2012

herbed leg of lamb with roasted turnips
fall festThough potatoes prove a year-round hit, their starchy cousin gets special attention once fall draws near and the sweaters are pulled on. As a member of the root veggie clan, turnips are a comforting alternative when whipped with butter, roasted in the oven or glazed stovetop.

If you’re a meat-and-potatoes kind of person, it’s about time you give meat and turnips a chance, too. Consider it the perfect side for a casual weeknight meal or a traditional Sunday dinner. No matter how you prepare this root vegetable, it’s sure to comfort you to your core.

As far as a meaty meal goes, any hearty cut will do alongside a heap of turnips. Try Food Network Magazine’s Slow-Cooker Ham With Turnips or Herbed Leg of Lamb With Roasted Turnips (pictured above) for a star-crossed combination. Whip up Bobby Flay’s Turkey Pot Pie With Sage Crust or Food Network Magazine’s Vegetable Shepherd’s Pie for one-pot wonders brimming with turnip goodness. In that same way, Michael Symon’s Chicken-and-Dumpling Soup recipe for Food Network Magazine ladles bits of turnip, rutabaga, fennel, celery, carrot and, of course, chicken and dumplings into each rejuvenating spoonful.

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Stuff It With Spinach — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, October 3rd, 2012

pork chops stuffed with spinach
fall festLet’s talk spinach. It’s the green at the center of family dinner dramas and the barrier to many kids’ elusive desserts. More often than not, kids just don’t want to eat their spinach. And if we’re getting down to it, who can blame them? When spinach exits the freezer as a rock-hard rectangle and is defrosted into a soggy mess, who’s going to be down for a side of that?

Now that we’ve made it to October, things start to look up for spinach because each leaf is crisply in season.

We’re all about the classics like Hot Spinach Artichoke Dip. But sometimes you have to level with the little ones, the picky eaters and the greenaphobes sitting around your dinner table. Who knows, maybe incorporating spinach into their lives little by little could mean straight Creamed Spinach this time next year. When you want to savor this green — and satisfy the whole family — look to Food Network’s spinach-stuffed recipes to make everyone happy.

If a recipe asks for the frozen kind, go ahead and swap in the fresh stuff. This time of year there’s no need to defrost. Go for baby spinach to reduce stem clipping, too. That way, spinach can melt into your meals in the best way possible.

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The Rise of the Kale Chip — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, September 26th, 2012

kale chips
Where were you the first time you ate a kale chip? Sitting on the couch watching reruns? Mingling at your foodie friend’s last dinner party? After a lifetime of guilt-inducing potato chip munching, there’s something pretty eye-opening about digging your fists into a bowl of solid kale chips. Salty, crispy and undeniably addictive, each one triggers that same sensation as the potato variety without the, well, bodily consequences.

Now that we’re inching into fall, each leaf of sturdy kale is in season and as pristine as ever. Use this to your advantage. As the weather gets colder and our food gets richer, going with the smart snack is probably a noble choice.

With just a drizzle of olive oil and a crack of sea salt, it’s easy to make homemade kale chips. Trust me, Food Network Magazine’s Kale Chips (pictured above) aren’t rocket science, but if you’re looking to get inventive, we’ve got just the thing for you.

Kale chips come in many forms, just like your favorite bag of potato chips. Accentuate the classically sea-salted with Guy Fieri’s Crispy Kale Chips With Lemon, which adds a shot of citrus and some crushed red pepper. Or churn up a Lemon Mayonnaise that serves as a perfect match for a dip-bound chip.

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The Multipurpose Potato — Summer Fest

by in In Season, September 19th, 2012

four cheese scalloped potatoes
We’re teaming up with food and garden bloggers and our friends at HGTV Gardens to host Summer Fest 2012, a season-long garden party. In the past weeks, we’ve feature favorite garden-to-table recipes and tips to help you enjoy the bounty, whether you’re harvesting your own goodies or buying them fresh from the market. For the last installment of Summer Fest, we’re exploring potatoes.

Taken straight from the sack, potatoes are pretty bland. But with just a little love — and butter — they become a force to be reckoned with. And let’s face it: They’re as versatile as they are comforting. Yukon gold or russet? Baked or smashed? Now that the most satisfying crop of all is in season, there’s no telling what could end up on your dinner table tonight.

If you grow your own potatoes, did you know they can keep for upwards of six months or more? Fresh potatoes can be eaten immediately and are prized for their tender, new skins. But potatoes can also be cured in a dry, room temperature space to allow skins to slightly desiccate. Keep them in the dark and they can store for upwards of six months. For more great tips like this one, be sure to check out HGTV Gardens.

Before we get ahead of ourselves, there’s something to be said for a quality baked potato. You know, the kind that’s sliced down the middle, perfectly moist on the inside and inundated with toppings. Food Network Magazine’s Twice Baked Potatoes pack in leeks and chive-and-onion cream cheese, while the Neelys’ Twice Smashed Baked Potatoes recipe goes the broccoli and double-cheese route.

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