All Posts In In Season

8 Times This Fruit Proved It’s the Cherry On Top

by in In Season, Recipes, July 5th, 2016

Ripe, garnet-hued cherries are now in season. Once you get your fill of picking up the sweet-tart gems by their delicate stems and popping them in your mouth whole, we’ve got eight delicious ways to enjoy cherries’ fleeting flavor, from crepes to cocktails and savory salads…and of course, the quintessentially summer cherry pie.

What’s better than all-American cherry pie? Individually-sized Cherry Hand Pies (pictured above) you can gobble down without a fork…or even a plate. (Keep some napkins on hand so you can dab away that powdered sugar mustache, though.) Read more

What Do I Do with Kohlrabi?

by in In Season, Recipes, July 3rd, 2016

KohlrabiKohlrabi is a cruciferous vegetable, just like cabbage, broccoli and kale. This funny-looking vegetable is about the size and shape of an orange, with a bunch of leafy stems sticking out. It has a thick skin that can range from pale green to purplish, though the inside is always a very pale yellow. The leaves are all edible (the freshest kohlrabi will still have the leaves attached, which can be eaten raw or cooked like any greens). The smaller bulbs tend to be more tender and flavorful, but the large ones are also fine for cooking and eating. In taste and texture, kohlrabi reminds me of peeled broccoli stems with a bit of peppery radish thrown in.

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Top 10 Tips for Excellent Summer Grilling

by in Food Network Chef, In Season, June 23rd, 2016

Perfect Baby Back RibsSummer is in full swing, and that means most of us are firing up that backyard grill. If you are shying away from grilling, or just want a refresher course on the basics of grilling, then keep reading.  Here are my top 10 tips for excellent summer grilling.

1. Start with a clean grill. Don’t let last night’s salmon skin impart a fishy-char flavor to tonight’s chicken breasts. Use a sturdy metal brush to clean off the grates in between uses. (This is easiest when the grill is hot.)

2. Don’t move the food around. In general, the fewer times you flip something, the better (once is ideal for most meats). If the meat is stuck to the grill, let it cook more — it will unstick itself when it’s ready for flipping.

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What Do I Do with Rhubarb?

by in In Season, Recipes, June 11th, 2016

Rhubarb Custard PieRhubarb, a classic produce variety of spring and early summer, is a vegetable that often gets cooked as though it were a fruit. Its long, crisp stalks look a lot like reddish-pinkish-purplish celery. They are quite tart; often some sort of sweetener is adding in the cooking process, especially when rhubarb is used in dessert recipes. Its nickname is the “pie plant,” since it so often ends up as a pie filling — or crisp or cobbler — sometimes along with a sweeter fruit, like strawberries or raspberries. Rhubarb can also be made into jam or compote to be canned.

Rhubarb is sold in bunches, or sometimes as individual stalks. Choose fresh, crisp stalks with good color and no blemishes, then trim the tops and bottoms and peel off any noticeably stringy bits. If any leaves are attached, throw them out — they have a high level of natural toxins and should not be eaten. Rhubarb can be stored in the fridge for up to five days, wrapped in plastic.

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A Regional Guide to Barbecue Sauce

by in In Season, Recipes, Shows, June 11th, 2016

Sweet and Sticky BBQ Sauce (Kansas City Style)Just as those in Northern cities and states lay claim to different styles of pizza, hot dogs and clam chowder, many in the South have passionate ideas for what barbecue sauce should be. Sweet, smoky, tangy, sticky, crimson and white — there’s no shortage of flavors, looks and textures when it comes to creating the ultimate meat accompaniment. On this morning’s all-new episode of The Kitchen, the co-hosts broke down barbecue sauces by region, looking at the signature elements of each — and sharing how simple it is to make them all at home, no matter where you live. Read on below for four of the most-common ‘cue sauces, then tell us in the comments which is your favorite.

Sweet and Sticky BBQ Sauce (Kansas City Style)
Featuring a base of ketchup, molasses and brown sugar, this thick sauce is indeed packed with sugar, but the sweetness is hardly overwhelming. The key is balancing those ingredients with a splash of tangy apple cider vinegar and the umami-like funk of Worcestershire sauce for well-rounded results.

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What Do I Do with Ramps?

by in In Season, May 29th, 2016

Spring PizzasIf there is a niche vegetable that garners more controversial attention from the foodie set, it would be hard to name. Still cool? Yesterday’s news? Please. Read more

6 Essential Pieces for Foolproof Picnics

by in In Season, Product Reviews, May 15th, 2016

The long-awaited season of alfresco dining has finally returned, and the last thing we want to see when we open our picnic baskets is a cracked pie or a leaky bowl of coleslaw. A sturdy carrier is our greatest ally when preparing for an outdoor feast, and luckily, there are plenty of dependable totes, bowls and baskets designed to get your precious cargo to the park in one piece. Here are a few trusted picnicking sidekicks that are worth investing in this summer.

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What Do I Do with Beets?

by in In Season, Recipes, May 15th, 2016

Roasted BeetsIf you believe that cooking beets (sometimes called beetroots) at home is a messy and intimidating undertaking, you are not alone. But they are so wonderfully sweet and versatile, and have such a luxurious, silky texture that it’s worth giving them a second look. Plus, they’re actually easy to prepare. Read more

7 Top-Rated Strawberry Recipes

by in In Season, Recipes, May 8th, 2016

Heart Pancakes with StrawberriesWe’re edging into strawberry season, which means that in warmer parts of the country those fragrant, ruby-hued berries are popping up at the farmers markets, and pick-your-own operations are finally open for business. In cooler areas, we’re relying on supermarket berries for now, but even those are flavorful and juicy at this time of year.

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What Do I Do with Leeks?

by in In Season, Recipes, April 23rd, 2016

Leeks are a member of the Allium family, which is essentially the onion family, and can really be used in any way that you would use an onion, which is lots of ways. Their flavor is slightly milder than that of a typical onion. They look like oversized scallions or green onions, long and cylindrical, and they should be firm, with nice taut layers.

They are available in the fall and the spring, with the spring leeks being smaller and more mildly flavored. The dark green tops are very fibrous and tough, and can be used to flavor stocks, but it’s the light green and white parts that are best for eating. Leeks can be eaten raw or cooked, and featured as a vegetable in their own right (which is more common in European cooking) or as a supporting aromatic.

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