All Posts In In Season

Spring Clean Your Supper

by in Community, In Season, April 18th, 2012

spring peas with dates and walnuts
Let’s face it, spring cleaning isn’t the most exciting chore of the season, but it’s so gratifying after it’s all done. The same notion also applies to making over meals, especially when the produce starts to become so abundant. Our friends over at Yahoo! Shine have invited FN Dish readers to join their Supper Club. This month, they’re challenging readers to make weeknight dinners that are as fresh and bright as the season.

Don’t know where to begin? Food Network’s Spring Produce Guide is a good place to start. From asparagus to rhubarb, you can find tips and recipes for cooking up spring produce at its peak.

Spring Peas With Dates and Walnuts from Food Network Magazine (pictured above) is a market-fresh salad that calls for not one but three kinds of spring peas: English, sugar snap and snow peas.

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Springtime Produce

by in In Season, Recipes, March 23rd, 2012


Spring is officially here, which means that it’s time to embrace the light, colorful, fragrant bounty this season has to offer. Whether you’re growing your own fruits and vegetables or simply prefer to peruse the produce aisle, the next few months are some of the freshest all year, promising bushels of ripe, sweet goods, such as vibrant asparagus, radishes, ramps and more. Below is Food Network’s list of spring-inspired recipes, each rich with in-season produce that will transform any basic dish into an inspired one.

Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Asparagus (pictured above) side dish is a no-fail recipe that delivers simple, satisfying results every time. Crunchy pine nuts, fragrant parsley and refreshing lemon zest are sprinkled atop slender spears before baking the asparagus until it’s warm and tender.

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Stuck in a Carrot Rut? — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in Family, In Season, February 7th, 2012

ginger carrot soup
Something happened a few weeks ago while I was at the farmers’ market. As I scanned the stands, looking over the slim produce pickings here in the Northeast, I decided to get to the root of the problem — root vegetables, that is. It’s February, and we’re knee-deep in parsnips, turnips and potatoes. How I long for the first green cylinders of zucchini and sweet pods of green peas. Soon enough, asparagus.

Since I can’t get in a time machine and fast forward to spring, I decided it was time to get creative and work with what I had before me. Into my bag went a big bundle of carrots. Then they sat in the bin for a week. A whole week — thank heavens root vegetables are resilient and forgiving. I originally picked them up since they’re one of my daughters’ favorite vegetables. The problem is I tend to fall back on standard serving ideas, like simply roasting them or cutting into sticks to pair with dip. Not bad, but certainly a one-way ticket to boredom if done too frequently.

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Roasted Winter Squash — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, December 7th, 2011

curried winter squash
fall festTurn winter squash into a simple snack with curry powder and butter. Whether you’re partial to acorn, buttercup, butternut, hubbard, spaghetti or turban, this quick recipe from Food Network Magazine showcases the fruit’s plump, soft flesh.

When shopping, the firmer the squash the better. Winter squash’s thick skin allows for longer storage times (as long as you keep it in a cool, dark place and don’t refrigerate). Don’t forget to watch out for blemishes or moldy spots.

A great source of iron, riboflavin and vitamins A (more than summer squash) and C, this Curried Winter Squash is so addictive don’t be surprised if you eat it all in one sitting.

More squash recipes from our friends & family »

Top 3 Beet Salad Recipes — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 30th, 2011

beet and apple salad
fall festAs November comes to a close, serve one last bright meal that channels summer and casts away the soon-to-be-winter chill. Beets are not only pretty, but this versatile root vegetable can be easily thrown into a quick salad.

When shopping, choose beets that are firm and have smooth skin. Small or medium-sized beets are often more tender, while their color can range from a garnet red to white.

Serve a Beet and Apple Salad (pictured above) from Food Network Magazine as an easy starter. Apples and sugar give this dish a natural sweetness, while endive and walnuts add some crunch.

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Quick Carrot Sides for Thanksgiving — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 23rd, 2011

carrots
Add a pop of color to your Thanksgiving spread with an easy carrot side. Whether you steam, boil or roast these bright root vegetables, they’re a perfect last-minute addition — done in 20 minutes or less.

For Middle Eastern flair, make Food Network Magazine’s Roasted Carrots With Za’atar (pictured above). Start by roasting the carrots in salt and pepper, then toss them with za’atar (a spice blend available at Middle Eastern markets), parsley and a splash of lemon.

Sunny’s Honey Glazed Carrots let the vegetable’s natural flavor shine through. Cook until a light honey glaze coats the carrots. We guarantee you won’t be able to eat just one.

More carrot recipes from family and friends »

Simply Roasted Turnips — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 9th, 2011

turnips
Give humble root vegetables a chance with this easy roast turnip recipe from Food Network Magazine. The root itself is high in vitamin C, but don’t forget the leafy turnip greens. Similar in flavor to mustard greens, choose smaller leaves for a less bitter taste.

For the root: Peel and cut into wedges. Toss with olive oil or melted butter, and salt and pepper on a baking sheet. Roast at 425 degrees F, 35 to 45 minutes. Try this: Melt 2 tablespoons butter with 1 tablespoon each maple syrup and lemon juice, and a pinch each of cumin and red pepper flakes. Toss with the roasted turnips.

For the greens: Wash and dry 10 cups of turnip greens. Put in a saucepan with 1/2 cup olive oil, 2 thinly sliced garlic cloves, 1/4 cup water and 1 teaspoon salt. Cover and cook over medium-low heat until tender, about 40 minutes. Season with pepper.

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Roasted Cauliflower 5 Ways — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, November 2nd, 2011

roasted cauliflower
Boost your immune system with vitamin C before cold and flu season sets in by eating more cauliflower. A member of the cabbage family, cauliflower can be boiled, baked or sautéed, but for a well-browned exterior and a flavorful, moist interior, roasting is the way to go.

Start simple with Emeril’s Oven-Roasted Cauliflower With Garlic, Olive Oil and Lemon Juice. We bet even the biggest cauliflower-haters will think twice after sampling this quick yet flavorful dish.

Claire’s Roasted Cauliflower With Dates and Pine Nuts (pictured above) is a wonderful fall side for those willing to experiment with flavor. Roasting the cauliflower makes it slightly sweet and turns into an unexpected complement to the dates.

Try Guy’s Roasted and Pureed Cauliflower as a mashed-potato substitute. With only six ingredients, this side is an easy addition to any weeknight meal.

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Squash and Pumpkin Soup

by in In Season, Recipes, October 31st, 2011

Fall Squash and Pumpkins
There are so many beautiful (and strange-looking) squash at the market right now. Sure, they’re great for a table centerpiece for Thanksgiving, but why not cook with them as well? Turn acorn, butternut, fairytale (yes, fairytale) and more into a delicious fall soup. Add in some pumpkin and you’re cooking the best of what fall produce has to offer.

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The Ultimate Pumpkin Soup — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, October 26th, 2011

pumpkin soup
Pumpkin is not only synonymous with Halloween, but it also signifies the official arrival of fall. What better way to celebrate the season and National Pumpkin Day than with pumpkin soup? Decadent and warm, its bright color will keep away the pre-winter blues.

Try Rachael’s Pumpkin Soup With Chili Cran-Apple Relish for a scrumptious meal in less than 45 minutes. The natural sweetness of the pumpkin is enhanced with cinnamon and nutmeg, while the chili powder and hot sauce liven up each bite. The apple, onion, cranberry and honey make a great relish all on their own, but tastes even better when mixed into the soup.

More pumpkin recipes from family & friends »

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