All Posts In In Season

How to Master Meat: Chef Tim Love’s Tips and Advice for a Scorching July 4th Cookout

by in In Season, Recipes, July 2nd, 2015

Tim LoveWhen it comes to manning the grill, Tim Love, a longtime chef and restaurateur, is all business. This born-and-bred Texan is known for his expert preparation of meat, fusing together classic Western flavors with modern ingredients and flavors. On the all-new summertime tournament Chopped Grill Masters (premiering July 14 at 10|9c), Love will takes his place among the roster of esteemed Chopped judges as a master of meat as he oversee the 16 grilling professionals who are trying to wow the panel with worthy barbecue fare.

Just in time for this weekend’s 4th of July party, FN Dish caught up with Tim, who’s also teamed up with Hellmann’s Mayonnaise, which is celebrating a brand-new squeeze bottle, for his take on how to win the holiday cookout scene. From make-ahead favorites to his all-time favorite meat to grill, read on below to hear from Tim in an exclusive interview.

Come grilling season, which dish are you most looking forward to making every year? What do you crave most?
Tim Love: Nothing says summer like kebabs on the grill. There is just something about cubes of beef and veggies stuck on a stick over a flaming grill that makes me giddy. My go-to is Rosemary Steak Kebabs, because you can use the rosemary branches for skewers so it adds to the flavor.

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Summer Cooking (and Eating), Alex Guarnaschelli Style

by in Food Network Chef, In Season, July 1st, 2015

Alex GuarnaschelliThe beauty of summertime eats and drinks is that it all comes down to simple, fresh fare, which just so happens to pair well with long days outside and the warm temperatures of the season. Recently FN Dish caught up with Alex Guarnaschelli at one such alfresco feast, where she was celebrating the launch of her partnership with Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi to create a line of cookout-ready wine-infused barbecue sauces (you can buy them here). From her picks for seasonal entertaining to the secret to make-ahead appetizers, she shared her top ideas for summertime cooking, plus dished on what she piles on top of her ultimate burger. Read on below to hear what she had to say in an exclusive interview.

What’s your favorite way to entertain during the summer?
Alex Guarnaschelli: For a barbecue or a cookout — from Memorial Day through Labor Day and maybe even into October — I’m really big into the outdoor stuff. Because chefs are always locked indoors, we really appreciate those spring and summer months. I like to go nuts, and I think the best way to do that is to prepare a lot of stuff in advance. I definitely load my fridge door with a few salad dressings, vinaigrettes, sauces, the Woodbridge Wine ‘Cue sauce. I might take that Woodbridge Wine ‘Cue sauce and take it in a direction — I’ll add a big dose of fresh ginger, put it on shrimp. I’ll take that barbecue sauce and I’ll add a huge hit of chili powder and I’ll put it on a pork shoulder. You know, I might just take the personality of it and pull it. Because it’s got that wine flavor, those tannins. It’s almost like a dry barbecue sauce, like in the good sense, like a dry wine. I think that having all that stuff done in advance, for me, is huge. So when you talk about how charming it is, the butterflies and the unicorns and the rainbows, for me, it’s great when I have company over and I’m outdoors and I’ve lit the little tiki lamps and the food is out and people are drinking and we’re laughing and I’m not going back in the kitchen.

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The Top Picnic Mistakes to Avoid, and How to Fix Them If They Happen, Plus Boozy Bubbles to Pack in the Basket

by in Books, In Season, June 26th, 2015

The PicnicWhen it comes to summer picnics, you’ll be hard pressed to find better resources for tips, tricks and menus than Marnie Hanel, Andrea Slonecker and Jen Stevenson of the Portland Picnic Society. They’ve assembled the only picnic guide you’ll ever need in their new book, The Picnic. The Picnic has everything from the rules for common lawn games and 99 uses for Mason jars to delicious recipes and menu ideas. The book is perfect for the novice picnicgoer, with guides for packing your basket and how big a blanket to get, and a list of essential tools everyone always forgets.

One of the most-useful parts of The Picnic is the crisis-aversion section of the book, where 10 common picnic disasters are triaged proactively for you. Planning a picnic before you can snag your own copy of the book? Keep the following details in mind.

1. Bathroom Break: Nothing ruins a picnic like having to go, with no relief in sight. Scout the state of your picnic site’s restrooms upon arrival. If they’re locked or loathsome, search for the nearest coffeehouse and inform your friends of its location.

2. Beat the Heat: If it’s a real sizzler of a day, surprise your fellow guests with a Mediterranean-scented cooldown: Add a few drops of rose, citrus or lavender oil to chilled miniature spray bottles of water and distribute them to the crowd. (Paper fans work, too.)

3. Battle of the Bugs: Summer bugs are a picnic plague. Bring an arsenal of citronella votives and bug spray. To keep unwelcome sweet-tea swimmers at bay, try this easy trick for transforming a Mason jar: Remove the lid and set it aside. Take a square of decorative paper, punch a hole in it, lay it over the lip of your jar, replace the ring and poke a straw through the hole. Drink elsewhere, bugs.

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Layered Is the New Chopped: Try a Layered Salad for Every Season

by in In Season, Recipes, February 12th, 2015

These stacked salads from Food Network Kitchen prove dinnerworthy with layers of greens, seasonal vegetables, protein and crunch. Get inspired by the season (we’re currently obsessed with winter’s tasty beet-and-Brussels combo), or make a layered take on the classic wedge that’s a crowd-pleaser anytime of year. Read more

5 Reasons to Get Braising Now

by in How-to, In Season, January 4th, 2015

By Patricia Reilly

In the chilly season, simmering your supper using the easy and age-old technique of braising will bring warmth, coziness and fragrance to your kitchen. This simple, satisfying mode of cooking is perfect for the holidays and winter months, when hibernating at home allows time for a leisurely back-burner braise, building layers of flavor into fork-tender foods.

1. If you love comfort food, you’ll love braising. Think melt-in-your-mouth short ribs (pictured above), osso buco (much simpler than it sounds) and braised pork tacos. This is food that warms the soul while at the same time offering the terrific texture and flavor complexity you might associate with chef-y fare. Bottom line: Make enough for seconds and superior leftovers.

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POLL: What’s Your Favorite Fall Produce?

by in In Season, Shows, November 8th, 2014

Fall ProduceWhile pumpkins and apples may receive most of the glory when it comes to seasonal autumn eats, the bounty of fall produce reaches far beyond them, as hearty potatoes, colorful carrots and bite-size Brussels sprouts make their way to the farmers markets this time of year. On this morning’s all-new episode of The Kitchen, the co-hosts savored the flavors of fall by putting in-season ingredients to work in fresh, new ways, especially when it comes to ever-versatile cauliflower. Katie Lee, a no-nonsense pizza enthusiast, transformed cauliflower into a next-level pizza crust, while Marcela Valladolid roasted it with herbs and pickled peppers, and Sunny Anderson glazed cauliflower and treated it as a main dish.

Now that fall is in full swing, FN Dish wants to know what seasonal fruit or vegetable you’re most excited about enjoying. Are you a fan of fresh-from-the-orchard apples, or are you partial to tender-firm pears? Do you crave the subtle sweetness of butternut squash, or do you reach for golden sweet potatoes? Vote in the poll below to share your favorite fall produce.

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Brown Sugar Apple Crisp — Down-Home Comfort

by in In Season, Recipes, October 10th, 2014

Brown Sugar Apple CrispIn my family, fall means a trip to the mountains for apple picking and apple cider. We love buying a variety of different kinds of apples — some to refrigerate and keep for eating, some to make jelly, and always, always a couple of pounds of cooking apples for apple pie and crisp. While I adore apple pie, I have to admit that an apple crisp is so simple and easy that it’s my go-to apple dessert. There’s no pastry to make and no dough to roll out, and with a little pep in your prep you can have dessert in under an hour.

Crisps, along with their culinary cousins — crumbles, grunts, brown betties and pandowdies — are all simple, old-fashioned, homey desserts. The desserts in this genre use a streusel-like mixture of flour or breadcrumbs, sugar, warm spices and butter, along with rolled oats and nuts. I especially love to use fresh, in-season Georgia pecans in the fall, but almonds and walnuts are great, too. Crisps are flat-out easy, and everyone loves a piping-hot fruit dessert with a sweet, buttery topping. You can serve the crisp with ice cream, whipped cream, or even creme fraiche for an ultra-indulgent dose of down-home comfort. Read more

Pumpkin Spice (and Everything Nice) — Fall Fest

by in In Season, Recipes, October 9th, 2014

Pumpkin

If you gauge the dawn of fall by when your first pumpkin spice latte of the season is sipped, there aren’t any limits your pumpkin spice intake. Amidst trips to the pumpkin patch, carving contests and all your other pumpkin-centric fall activities, these sweet pumpkin recipes should be on tap all season long:

1. You’ve never seen another pumpkin pie with looks this good. Gingersnap Pumpkin Pie with Ginger Cream (pictured above) receives a deeper sweetness from a just-ripe banana and an extra notch of spice from the cookies. Word to the wise: Don’t be stingy with the whipped cream.

2. The perks to a batch of Spiced Pumpkin-Raisin Cookies don’t stop with all that pumpkin spice goodness. These seriously moist treats come without eggs, making them vegan friendly.

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5 Fall Recipes with Fresh Fennel

by in In Season, Recipes, October 7th, 2014

There are very few ingredients that can add to a dish what fresh fennel can add. It’s got a hint of sweetness, a nice crunch and a refreshing flavor. Known for being eaten raw as a palate cleanser at the end of a big Italian meal, it can be prepared or eaten just about any way you can imagine. Take these recipes, for example: roasted fennel in pasta, fennel salad and even a fennel slaw. Try out a few of these and before you know it you’ll be adding fennel into all kinds of things this fall.

Baked Penne with Fennel: When you think of creamy baked pasta, you don’t necessarily think of light flavors. But fennel can add the perfect soft flavor to just about anything — including this creamy baked penne. With pancetta, heavy cream and three different cheeses, the dish definitely benefits from the fennel’s subtle flavor.

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