All Posts In In Season

Vote for Your Favorite Gingerbread House

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, November 17th, 2015

gingerbread houseFor the December issues of Food Network Magazine and HGTV Magazine, the sister publications went head-to-head in a gingerbread house contest. The challenge: Each staff would decorate a simple gingerbread house made with a kit from the craft store, using all edible ingredients. Who won? That’s for you to decide.

Vote in the poll below, just for fun, to let the editors know which one is your favorite. Then head to Hearst’s sweepstakes page for a chance to win a $500 gift card to Michaels and a Wilton cake-decorating kit.

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Relax, It’s Just Butternut Squash

by in How-to, In Season, November 11th, 2015

Perhaps during a fall trip to the market you’ve been charmed by the heaping piles of colorful winter squash, stout and curvy, and wanted to bring them home. Perhaps you have. And perhaps once you’ve unpacked the squash and put them on the counter, you’ve thought, “Now what?”

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The Many Delicious Ways to Cook Sweet Potatoes

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, Recipes, November 6th, 2015

marshmallow sweet potatoesSweet potatoes are brighter, sweeter (obviously) and more fun than your everyday spud. Plus, they’re the only vegetables that make eating marshmallows during dinnertime perfectly acceptable. (If you’ve tried Sunny Anderson’s kid-favorite and adult-approved recipe [pictured above], you get it.) Below are some of our favorite ways to cook the orange-fleshed beauties at this time of year.

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3 Spaghetti Squash “Pasta” Recipes to Make Now

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, October 12th, 2015

spaghetti squash alfredo Spaghetti squash is the original source of veggie noodles. Unlike other vegetables, it doesn’t require you to use a spiralizer to create perfect, twirlable strands — after a quick roasting time, a fork is all that’s needed. Follow Food Network Magazine’s foolproof roasting guide here. Then, create a comforting low-carb dinner featuring the yellow gourd. Find delicious inspiration from the October issue below.

Spaghetti Squash Alfredo with Pancetta and Peas (pictured above)

You won’t miss the pasta when your squash strands are dressed up with Alfredo sauce. Shallots, white wine and fresh thyme balance the creaminess of the classically decadent dish.

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So, You Have a Lot of Apples? Make Applesauce

by in In Season, Recipes, October 2nd, 2015

Whether you’ve spent all weekend at the orchard or you simply picked up a few bags of the skinned beauties from the grocery store, your crisper drawer is likely chock-full of apples. Once you’ve had your fill of pies, tarts and breads — and worked apples into your favorite savory recipes — it’s time to look to applesauce.

If you’ve stayed away from the from-scratch stuff over worry of a tricky assembly, fear not. It’s as simple as piling the ingredients in a pot and letting the heat work its magic. In her fuss-free recipe for Homemade Applesauce, Ina Garten opts for a mix of tart and sweet apples, plus warm spices like cinnamon and allspice to add the comforting flavors of the season. She bakes the mixture at a moderate temperature — 350 degrees F — so the apples will slowly break down and turn soft. Once they’re ready, all you have to do to turn out a smooth finished product is toss the red peel and quickly whisk the applesauce before serving.

Click the play button on the video above to watch how Ina makes this easy, healthy fall staple.

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8 Apple Cider Cocktails to Try This Fall

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, September 18th, 2015

apple cider drinks

If you’ve ever gone apple picking, you know that a hot cup of cider is the ultimate treat on a crisp fall day. But the unfiltered juice is too good to be limited to your orchard experiences. It’s equally delicious cold and makes an amazing home cocktail mixer. To get the party started, Food Network Magazine came up with eight fun recipes so you can begin toasting to fall. Get happy hour (and dessert) inspiration from the October issue below and start mixing.

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Back-to-School Ideas and Late-Summer Dinners from Food Network Magazine

by in Food Network Magazine, In Season, September 4th, 2015

waffle chicken fingersAugust may be over, but summertime’s bountiful produce is still here — for now. Find the perfect recipes for celebrating the last days of summer in the September edition of Food Network Magazine. Before fall officially arrives and the bounty of stone fruit at the farmers market is replaced with buckets of apples, bake a pastry filled with nectarines or plums. What should also be on your to-do list: eating tomatoes of every shape and size and cooking with (a lot) of basil.

Complete with 50 easy bar cookie recipes and a special kids’ edition, this issue is also a great resource for back-to-school season. And Food Network Magazine staffers can vouch that even the kid-friendly recipes (think grilled cheese and chicken fingers) are just as tempting for adults. Read on for their favorite new recipes from the magazine and start cooking!

“I know the chicken tenders — Hawaiian, ramen, waffle (pictured above) and pizza — in our kids’ insert are geared toward a slightly younger audience, but I want to try them all. Warning to all parents: You may love them as much as your kiddos.

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How to Use Up Your Big Bunch of Basil (Without Making a Caprese Salad)

by in In Season, Recipes, August 10th, 2015

shrimp saladBasil is summer’s superstar herb, but too often it’s confined to sprinkling over tomato dishes. And the bundles you find at farmers markets and many grocery stores can be massive — meaning that the caprese salad recipe that calls for 10 or so leaves hardly makes a dent in the big bunch you just bought. Too much basil, however, can be a good problem when you know how to use it.

In the September issue of Food Network Magazine, you’ll find complete dinner menus that utilize the fragrant herb. The Thai-Style Basil Shrimp with Basil-Coconut Rice (pictured above) requires four cups of basil, for example. Browse through the rest of the magazine’s basil-laden recipes along with more ideas to enjoy your stash.

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Layer by Meaty Layer: How to Build the Best Burger, According to Tim Love

by in In Season, Recipes, July 19th, 2015

Layer by Meaty Layer: How to Build the Best Burger, According to Tim LoveBun, meat and toppings — there are only a few key elements to a classic burger, but it’s crucial to make each a success when building this ultimate summertime favorite. No one knows meat quite like Chef Tim Love, a Texas-based restaurateur who’s recently partnered with Hellmann’s Mayonnaise as the brand launches its Squeeze bottle, and FN Dish checked in with him to get his takes on constructing the ins and outs of a tried-and-true burger. Read on below for what he had to say, then browse our best-ever burger recipes ideal for outdoor cookouts.

The Bun: What’s your favorite kind?
Tim Love: Potato bun. Keep it classic.

The Meat: What’s your favorite ratio, and how should it be cooked?
TL: I like a 50/50 blend of prime tenderloin and prime brisket, but grilling meats to the perfect temperature can be tricky. Try using a meat thermometer and look for 130 to 135 degrees if you’re going for medium rare. That’s how I like mine done.

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Don’t Make These Burger Mistakes (But If You Do, Here’s How to Fix Them)

by in In Season, Recipes, July 9th, 2015

Don't Make These Burger Mistakes (But If You Do, Here's How to Fix Them)The sun is shining, the grill is hot and you’re looking forward to a meal of juicy meat. Fast-forward 30 minutes and you’re face to face with a dry, overcooked hunk of steak or a tough chicken tender. What went wrong? Getting the grilling game right can be tricky. When it comes to grilling burgers, meat master and Texas restaurateur Chef Tim Love recently told FN Dish, “There are actually two common mistakes I see often, which are a shame, so listen up!” He shared his take on those two problems, plus offered ways for avoiding them next time.

1. Flip Burgers Once and Only Once: Constant turning will toughen and dry out meat, and if you flip too soon, burgers will stick. Cook 2 minutes per side for rare, 3 for medium-rare, 4 for medium and 5 for well-done.

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