All Posts In How-to

VIDEO: How to Eat a Chicken Wing

by in How-to, November 23rd, 2012

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Thanksgiving is over, but the football games are just starting. If you’re tired of eating Thanksgiving leftovers (impossible, we know), dive into a pile of chicken wings. But before you start eating them, ask yourself this question: Am I eating this chicken wing the right way? Yes, there’s actually a right way to eat a chicken wing, and I promise it will make your entire perspective on eating wings a whole lot different.

So sit back, relax and watch. Once you’re done, find your favorite wing recipes to make so you can try it out yourself.

Every month I’ll be showing you the proper and easy way to eat something, so what would you like to see next? Tell me in the comments below.

Food Tastes Better on a Stick

by in How-to, October 25th, 2012

chocolate peanut butter popsI love eating food on a stick. Just the thought of overly salted, grease-saturated and often way-beyond-sweet treats attached to a stick for portable feasting makes me do the happy dance.

Rewind to summer car trips when I was a kid: My parents would load us into a tight compact car (some summers without air conditioning) and drive hundreds of miles seeking state fairs, the mecca of foods on a stick. Growing up in a city as I did, we rarely had an opportunity to indulge in “fair food.” So we would drive and drive with my mom as co-pilot in search of all things yummy. Armed with pockets full of dollar bills, we would hit the fairgrounds running, following the scent of fried anything.

Today, I love making “icles”: fudgesicles, creamsicles and Popsicles (like my Frozen Peanut Butter Pie Pops above). These are the most popular in terms of portable food in my sweet world, but have you ever tried to insert a stick into a piece of pie, then dip it into rich chocolate and roll it into nuts or coconut? Well, here you go:

Living in South Florida, we are all about Key lime pie, which is my favorite. First, make my fast and easy Key lime pie recipe featured here: Key Lime Pie Ice Cream Sandwiches.

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Beyond the Normal Duty of Kitchen Shears — The Product Puree

by in How-to, October 22nd, 2012

kitchen shearsIn this new column twice a month, Catherine McCord will be sharing a blend of kid-tested, mom-approved products and secrets to keeping sanity in the kitchen.

I am sure that it comes as no surprise that the room in my house in which I spend the most time is the kitchen. As a result, finding reliable kitchen tools which can perform double and triple duty is essential.

While some kids got cars, when I was 18 my mother gave me my first set of kitchen shears. And I was thrilled. Not just regular old scissors, kitchen shears are a cook’s best friend. Once you use a pair, you’ll wonder how you ever got by without them.

Here are just a few kitchen chores that become a breeze by using them:

  • Trimming fat off chicken and meat
  • Cutting the spine off shrimp to easily peel and devein them
  • Cutting the ends off green beans
  • Chopping herbs (especially chives) into tiny pieces
  • Cutting open food packaging

Read more for kitchen chores that become a breeze

Take a Seasoning Shortcut

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, October 8th, 2012

spice grinder
Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

You don’t need your measuring spoons every time a recipe calls for a specific amount of salt or pepper. Just count how many turns of your pepper mill make ¼ or ½ teaspoon and use that as your guide whenever you’re cooking. Do the same for salt: Count how many of your own pinches add up to each measurement. None of this has to be exact — you can always season to taste at the end.

(Photograph by Lara Robby/Studio D)

Improve Tomato Paste

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, October 2nd, 2012

Tomato paste

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

To tame the super-concentrated flavor of tomato paste, cook it in a pan with some oil and other aromatic ingredients like garlic, onion and spices — it will develop a great earthy flavor after a few minutes. Stir the paste with a wooden spoon while cooking so it doesn’t burn.

(Photograph by Marko Metzinger/Studio D)

Convection vs. Conventional Ovens — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, September 25th, 2012

conventional oven
Twice a month we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: My question is about convection ovens vs. conventional ovens. Do recipe bake times need to be altered in any way if the oven used is a conventional oven? I feel as though most recipes I try from experienced cooks are made in convection ovens and I wondered if it made a difference if my oven is conventional.  – K. Stroh

Find out the answer

Soften Your Corn Tortillas

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, September 24th, 2012

Corn Tortillas

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Steam corn tortillas in the microwave so they stay pliable and don’t split under the weight of taco fillings. Wrap a stack of tortillas in damp paper towels or a damp kitchen towel, then wrap in plastic wrap or place in a microwave-safe resealable plastic bag (keep the bag open to vent). Microwave until warm and flexible, about 1 minute.

(Photograph by Christopher Testani)

Which Wines and Oils Do I Use When Cooking? — Fix My Dish

by in How-to, September 15th, 2012

red and white wine
Twice a month we’re giving readers a chance to ask Food Network Kitchens’ advice about an issue they’re having with a dish. They can’t reformulate a recipe for you, but they’re happy to help improve it.

Question: I’m just not wine-smart — I don’t know a dry wine from a non-dry one. It sure would be helpful if the chefs would say what kind of wine they’re using in a recipe, not brand specific, but if it’s a Chardonnay or a Merlot. And when they speak of using a finishing oil on their food, what does that mean? – Karen Shelton

Answer: Don’t stress about what kind of wine to cook with. It’s pretty straightforward: If it tastes good in the glass, it’ll taste good in the dish. As a basic rule of thumb, think white wines for delicate flavors like shellfish or most vegetables. Use red wines for robust flavors in red sauces and braised meats.

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Fry Like a Pro

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, September 12th, 2012
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Fried Zucchini and Mozzarella

Hot Tips From Food Network Kitchens’ Katherine Alford:

Next time you’re battering food for frying, make sure the flour or cornstarch thoroughly coats your ingredients before you dip them in batter or egg because batter tends to slide off bare spots. Dip food in the flour a second time, then tap or shake off any excess before battering so it doesn’t clump in the fryer.

Try it: Fried Zucchini and Mozzarella (pictured above)

Don’t Stop Grilling: Pat LaFrieda, Jr. Says There’s Great Barbecue Beyond Labor Day

by in How-to, September 6th, 2012

beef and pork ribs
We firmly believe that grilling season doesn’t have an expiration date, yet so many of us cover our barbecues and smokers once a chill hits the air. We’re not alone in feeling this way. The “Magician of Meat,” Pat LaFrieda, Jr., also agrees with us. We caught up with him and asked him about grilling beyond Labor Day and if there are any differences you need to be aware of.

Just like wearing white after Labor Day is a no-no, are there similar rules with barbecue?
If you pack up your grill for the winter after Labor Day, you are no longer a member of the LaFrieda family. Grill all winter — the colder it is, the more you will appreciate the food coming off the grill.

Is it true that food takes longer to barbecue in cooler weather? Why?
It’s not completely true. If you heat up the grill a few minutes earlier than usual you’ll be good to go.

Make it the year of barbecue

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