All Posts In How-to

How to Make Roasted Garlic … to Ward Off Vampires

by in Holidays, How-to, October 28th, 2013

Garlic will keep vampires off your doorstep this Halloween — except friendly ones in their Twilight costumes, of course. Bonus: Once roasted, this vampire repellent is delicious. Follow our easy step-by-step how-to, then spread the fragrant cloves on toasted baguette rounds for a quick appetizer, or puree them into pasta sauce or soup. For the non-vampires in the crowd, it’ll be the hit of your Halloween party.

See how to make roasted garlic in five easy steps.

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How to Microwave Corn

by in How-to, August 17th, 2013

How to Microwave CornNow that there’s corn at every farmers market, we’re spending a lot of time husking it while wondering if there’s a better way. Last year, a video came out addressing this predicament that immediately went viral, racking up, at last count, more than 7 million YouTube views. In it, an adorable gentleman claimed that if you steamed corn in the microwave and then shook it out of the husk, it would slide out well-cooked and completely clean of husk and silk. We had to see this technique in action for ourselves. Our conclusion? Microwaving corn on the cob works, and it’s delicious. The corn comes out perfectly tender — with not a string of silk in sight.

Get the step-by-step photos

Easy As Pie — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in How-to, July 23rd, 2013

Easy As PieSome of my must-have travel items include three types of flour, two types of sugar and a collection of ground spices. Not your average vacation packing list, I know, but essential for me when hunkering down at the beach for two weeks. As my Instagram feed filled with photos of sugo, breakfast bread puddings and homemade pies, someone commented “don’t forget you’re on vacation.” But here’s the catch: I love cooking, and it never feels like a chore or something I want to take an extended break from doing.

My life as a recipe developer is driven by two goals. First and foremost is flavor, but a close second is creating recipes with easy techniques, so that people can see just how enjoyable cooking can be. Vacation inspires a lot of creativity in the kitchen, too. I found myself surrounded with super-sweet berries out on the North Fork of Long Island, and suddenly my mind was filled with thoughts of homemade pie. My go-to recipe is made using a food processor, as well as cornmeal and vinegar — three things I didn’t have at the house I was renting. Necessity being the mother of invention, I gave some more thought to my original recipe.

Keep reading for the recipe

Grill Veggies Right

by in Food Network Magazine, How-to, July 2nd, 2013

veggies on a cutting boardYou don’t need a special basket to grill vegetables. Just slice them on the bias to expose more surface area — this prevents pieces of skinny vegetables like zucchini or yellow squash from falling through the grate, and it lets more of the vegetable come in contact with both your marinade and the grill.

(Photograph by Justin Walker)

Have You Tried Yuzu?

by in How-to, June 26th, 2013

Yuzuby Jacob Schiffman

I came across the Japanese citrus fruit yuzu during a sushi bar crawl almost 10 years ago. It’s really tart, with a complex, tangy flavor that’s part grapefruit and lemon, part orange, and all delicious. You can use the rind, the juice or both.

The first time I had yuzu, it added sharp tartness to a mayo-based sauce for hamachi (yellowtail). I then started seeing it in condiments for tempura-fried foods, dipping sauces for french fries at bars, on specialty cocktail menus and even in fancy pastries. Chefs ask for it all the time on Iron Chef America — while they mostly ask for the yuzu juice, in my experience as a buyer for Food Network, I’ve seen everything from yuzu marmalade and yuzu mayo to yuzu candy and yuzu vinegar. And sometimes (rarely) I’ve seen fresh yuzu in markets (pictured above) in the late fall through early winter. No matter the format, I think you’ll be seeing a lot more yuzu in the future.

How do you yuzu? Tell us in the comments below.

Try these recipes that feature yuzu

Preserving the Season — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in How-to, In Season, June 19th, 2013

Fresh Refrigerator PicklesWhen strawberries start popping up at the farmers’ markets, that’s my signal to get jamming. The window for enjoying sun-kissed, sweet berries here in the Northeast is far too short. Learning to preserve is one way to extend the season — and add much-needed variety come January, when we’re knee-deep in apples and pears. Berries are just the beginning of it all, though.

Short-Term Benefits
Preserving is a way to stretch the life of your fruits and vegetables. You can choose short-term storage, by making jams that will stay fresh for a few weeks in the fridge, or pickling, which lasts a few months. This is a good way to get your feet wet and master part of the technique needed for long-term storage.

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Let’s Get Grilling — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in How-to, May 29th, 2013

Sweet Cola RibsMemorial Day signaled the unofficial start to summer, so it’s only natural that the next part in The Good Cook series should be about grilling and barbecuing. Here’s a quick primer to get you started.

Direct Heat vs. Indirect Heat: The first thing to think about when grilling is how long your food will take to cook and that all depends on what you’re making. Quick-cooking items like sausage links, steak and shrimp cook best when placed directly over the heat source (i.e., flame or hot coals). This is called direct-heat cooking.

Brisket and ribs, on the other hand, need a long cooking time to become tender, so you want to use an indirect cooking method. This simply means the coals are piled, also called “banked,” on one side of the grill, or just the outer gas burners are turned on. The food is placed on the rack, away the flame or hot coals, and cooks from the radiant heat. It’s akin to turning your grill or barbecue into an oven. With this cooking method, you’ll also need to keep the grill closed to maintain a consistent cooking temperature.

Gas vs. Charcoal Gas Grills

How to Make a Steak — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in How-to, May 18th, 2013

London BroilToday we’re talking steak as part of The Good Cook series. Generally, cooking steak involves a direct-heat cooking method, such as a very hot skillet, an oven broiler or taking it outdoors to the grill. Deciding which cooking method is best all depends on what kind of steak you bought, also known as the cut of steak.

New York strip, sirloin and rib eye, familiar steak house favorites, cook up quickly in a very hot skillet on the stovetop (I love using my cast iron), or on the grill. A rare to medium-rare steak needs only three to four minutes on each side. If you prefer your meat cooked medium or medium-well, finish it off in an oven preheated 350 degrees F to keep it tender and juicy.

Flank, skirt and London broil are best prepared using your stove’s broiler or on the grill. These cuts are also best served medium-rare; cook them about five minutes per side, otherwise they become too tough. The way you slice these cuts of steak is another important detail. Hold your knife at a slight angle, about 45 degrees, and slice it across the grain.

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Perfect Roast Chicken — Simple Scratch Cooking

by in How-to, Recipes, May 11th, 2013

A Simple Roast Chicken by Jennifer PerilloI hesitated for a long time before including a recipe for roasted chicken in my cookbook. It seemed so basic and simple, but as I talked to more and more home cooks it became apparent that roasting a whole chicken is an intimidating kitchen project for many people. And when I use the word project, I mean it very loosely, because really there’s no fuss in doing it.

The real key is the right cooking temperature; that’s what ensures a super crispy skin, but also keeps the white meat juicy and moist. And forget about trussing — this isn’t your mother’s roast chicken. In fact, I’ve found that the chicken cooks more evenly if you leave the legs wide open. It allows the heat to circulate throughout the chicken, so the dark and white meats cook evenly.

Learn how to make a roast chicken

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