All Posts In How-to

Kitchen Cleaning All-Stars in Your Pantry and Fridge

by in How-to, April 19th, 2017


Getting ready to clean the coffeemaker or scrub away at those unfortunate stains (tomato soup?) in your microwave? Before you reach under the sink for any household cleaning products, give DIY cleaners a try to polish stainless steel, clean grease stains and freshen the garbage disposal. They’re easy to whip up with a few natural ingredients and pantry items.

Lemon

The most edible of the cleaning all-stars is also pretty versatile. Cut out a slice and use it straight on stainless steel appliances to remove grease and streaks.

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How to Make All-Natural Easter Egg Dyes with Food

by in How-to, View All Posts, April 9th, 2017

EggsSkip the kit this year and make colored Easter eggs with ingredients from your kitchen. You can use fruits, vegetables and even candy to make brightly colored eggs without any chemicals. All it takes is a bit of patience and some creativity in the kitchen.

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How to Juggle Breakfast at Home

by in How-to, Recipes, February 18th, 2017

The trickiest part of any meal is getting the timing right: delivering the many components of a meal on the table at the same time at their ideal temps, and while they’re still Instagram-ready. But timing is never more of a challenge than at breakfast, when you’re juggling hot coffee, perfectly-browned toast that must be buttered before it cools (and eaten before it turns soggy), and eggs that can go from warm and delicious to cool and congealed in the blink of an eye. Follow these steps to achieve a delicious, still-warm first meal every morning.

Step 1: Caffeinate Yourself

First things first: no one should have to pull off the balancing act that is breakfast without any caffeine in their system. Before you even think about anything else, start the coffee maker or put on the kettle for your French press or pour-over.

And, sure, you can dump in some cold milk in your coffee mug, and that’s what I do when I’m in a rush. But milk that’s been warmed and frothed elevates a standard cup of coffee without much effort (especially when it comes to non-dairy milks, which meld into coffee so much more seamlessly when heated. Nothing makes me sadder than when I add almond milk straight from the fridge to a cup of hot coffee and it instantly looks like a cup of miso soup with floating particles of the non-dairy milk). I instantly upgraded my usual breakfast when I picked up a Breville Hot Choc & Froth. Now on mornings when I’m not running around like a headless chicken, I spend the two extra minutes to make a quick café au lait dolloped with foam that feels like a total indulgence that doesn’t involve forking over $5 to a barista.

Step 2: Make a Game Plan Read more

3 Ways to Get Your Poaching On

by in How-to, Recipes, Shows, January 14th, 2017

Poached EggsIf you’ve ever enjoyed a plate of eggs Benedict for brunch, you know the rich decadence of poached eggs. To poach something is to cook it in liquid, and those poached eggs nestled atop a bed of Canadian ham and an English muffin bottom were gently simmered in hot water. Though poaching an egg requires a bit more finesse than does, say, scrambling one, the process is simple nonetheless — as is the technique of poaching just about anything else. On this morning’s all-new episode of The Kitchen, the co-hosts shared tips for poaching eggs, plus salmon and pear. Read on below to get the recipes.

How to Make Poached Eggs
Let’s start with breakfast so you can make your own eggs Benedict. In addition to the eggs, you’ll need just one ingredient: vinegar, which helps to keep the whites intact and surrounding the yolks, instead of running in the water. It’s a good idea to crack the eggs into bowls before dropping them in the vinegar-laced water; in case the yolks break, you’ll be able to rescue them beforehand.

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Food Network Staffer Diary: I Took a Knife Skills Class, and Here’s What I Learned

by in Behind the Scenes, How-to, December 28th, 2016

Food Network Staffer Diary: I Took a Knife Skills Class, and Here's What I LearnedDear readers, this is my confession. I may work in food, but for my entire life, I have been holding my knife incorrectly. And using the wrong knives. And generally making life more difficult for myself than it needed to be.

Finally, I decided to do something about it.

For the last four years of my life, I was a college student, settling for cutting everything in my house with a haphazard set of serrated and paring knives. Everything worked, but just barely. I was too busy focusing on my classes to focus on technique or true expediency.

But now I have graduated and have a little more dignity than a bowl full of misshapen veggies — and the constant fear that I might slice my finger off with a steak knife as I slice through a slippery mango. And I have a whole slew of foodie co-workers to impress. So, what does any post-grad with a plan do?

Go back to school, of course.

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Mastering the Elusive Macaron

by in Holidays, How-to, December 13th, 2016

There’s the coconut-based macaroon, wet and miserably dense. And then there’s the ambrosial French macaron — lighter, more ethereal and only a little harder to pronounce (mah-kah-ROHN).

The cupcake craze may have come and gone, but macarons will always have, for me, a timeless mysticism about them. Maybe it’s their aromatic chewiness or their richly scented history as descendants of the medieval Arab world (think pistachios, almond pastries and rose water).

One thing’s for certain: The perfect macaron can be impossible to find.

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4 Food-Inspired Halloween Costumes You Can DIY

by in How-to, October 25th, 2016

Asparagus costumeHalloween is just around the corner. If you’re still brainstorming a kid-friendly costume, look no further than your kitchen for inspiration! These costumes are all made out of balloons and clothing your kid already owns. Read on for step-by-step instructions on how to make them. Read more

Roasting (and Flavoring) Pumpkin Seeds Is Even Easier Than You Think

by in How-to, October 20th, 2016

When you’re scooping out a pumpkin to make a jack-o’-lantern for Halloween, fight the urge to toss the seeds in the trash. We know — they come out covered in orange goop. But you’d be surprised how quickly they turn into a crunchy, roasty snack, with just a little extra effort. We’ve outlined how to save and roast pumpkin seeds here, but here’s the short version: Clean them in a colander to remove the pulp, spread them on parchment to air-dry, and then toss them in your favorite flavorings and roast at 425 degrees F for about 10 minutes. That’s it!

They’re delicious simply sprinkled with salt (that’s what we did above), but they’re also the perfect blank canvas for many spice and seasoning combos. Try tossing your seeds in these mixes.

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These Super-Tidy Pantries Are Everything You Want in Kitchen Storage

by in How-to, September 14th, 2016

The thing about a kitchen is that no matter how diligent you are about keeping it clean, no amount of counter-wiping, dish-washing, or leftovers-eating is ever going to combat the inevitable clutter. Kitchens come with stuff — which is probably why you have a Pinterest board full of pantry organizing ideas, all promising a neater, more efficient space (plus, they’re just really cool to look at). We asked four bloggers with fabulous pantries how they keep things tidy, and we suggest you steal all of their genius ideas.

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How to Cook the Perfect Pot of Quinoa

by in How-to, Shows, August 31st, 2016

quinoaBy Angela Carlos

This week on Chopped Teen Tournament, we saw four young cooks compete for the chance to move on to the grand finale. You could feel the pressure rising as they used their experiences, both inside and outside the kitchen, to inspire their dishes. In Round 1, it wasn’t immediately clear what the teenage cooks were going to come up with using saucisson en croute (a fancy pig in a blanket), quinoa, white harissa and seaweed salad, but they figured it out, and Lyanna and Thomas even received a special nod from the judges for their restaurant-quality plating styles.

Quinoa has become increasingly popular over the last few years, but that doesn’t mean it’s the easiest food to cook. As we saw, not all of the competitors were able to cook their quinoa to the judges’ satisfaction. Like rice, quinoa requires some know-how if you want to achieve that tender, fluffy (not mushy) texture.

Here’s how to cook quinoa

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