All Posts In Holidays

Stuffing vs. Dressing: It Doesn’t Matter, So Long As One Is on Your Thanksgiving Table

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 16th, 2015

Sausage and Herb StuffingCan you really call your stuffing a “stuffing” if it wasn’t cooked inside the turkey? Do New Yorkers make “dressing,” or is that only a Southern dish? How many ingredient mix-ins is too many when it comes to reinventing the stuffing wheel? There are countless debates surrounding this all-important Thanksgiving side dish, but no matter what argument you believe, one thing is certain: A stuffing or a dressing (however you define it) ought to be on your table this turkey day. Check out Food Network’s all-star lineup of the best picks for both seasonal stuffings and dressings.

Sausage and Herb Stuffing
The beauty of Ina Garten’s timeless stuffing is that you don’t need to start prepping it days in advance to dry out the bread. She simply toasts freshly cut cubes for a few minutes to achieve the same effect.

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The Ultimate Thanksgiving Breadbasket: Cornbread, Dinner Rolls and More

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 15th, 2015

dinner rollsWhen preparing for this year’s Thanksgiving, don’t let the breadbasket become an afterthought. As the vehicle for soaking up precious gravy-drenched, cranberry-stained bits of food from your plate, bread is a key player for the big feast. Yeast or no yeast, baking from scratch is easier than you think. But we’ve got a trick for jazzing up frozen dinner rolls, too, just in case.

We’ve rounded up some of our favorite recipes to pass around the table for the big night. Make your own cheesy crescents, Parker House rolls, fluffy biscuits and more. Whatever you decide on, don’t forget to factor in the next day’s leftover turkey sandwich. The best leftovers of the year deserve to be sandwiched between something equally delicious.

Food Network Magazine’s Basic Dinner-Roll Dough

This versatile dough can be transformed into four amazing recipes: sea salt dinner rolls, herbed fan-tans, cranberry knots and three-cheese crescents. Bake them now, then stash them away in the freezer until Nov. 26 (or up to one month). Before serving them with your turkey, thaw them at room temperature for 30 minutes, then reheat in a 375 degree F oven for 10 minutes.

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Get Sauced: Spike Your Cranberry Sauce This Thanksgiving

by in Entertaining, Holidays, Recipes, November 14th, 2015

With everything else crowding the Thanksgiving table, the cranberry sauce usually doesn’t steal the show. We’re changing that up this year with this tipsy recipe that spikes the traditional jellied sauce with vodka. Watch Food Network Kitchen’s video below to see how it’s done, then follow their lead to make your cranberry sauce the most-popular side — or cocktail shooter — of Thanksgiving 2015. It may well become a new tradition. Just be sure to keep it away from the kids’ table, because it looks just like its nonalcoholic cousin!

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Sunny Anderson’s Canned Cranberry Thanksgiving Hack

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, November 14th, 2015

Sunny AndersonThe centerpiece roast turkey, the spread of casseroles, the pumpkin pie (and, likely, the apple pie too) — there’s no shortage of to-dos come Thanksgiving. So when there’s an opportunity to make your prep work a tad easier, it’s indeed tempting to give in. Hear from The Kitchen‘s Sunny Anderson about how she transforms a tried-and-true store-bought staple — the infamous canned cranberries — into an all-new side dish.

According to Sunny, one of her go-to holiday hacks is “cranberry sauce out of the can.” But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t dress it up. When it comes to the jellied stuff and the whole-cranberry option, she explains: “You can mix it together. … I take the jelly. I don’t slice it; that looks crazy. You just beat it with a whisk until it becomes a little bit loose, and then you add in the [canned whole cranberries].” To add an extra boost of homemade flavor, she brightens up the sauce with citrus. “A little bit of orange juice, some orange rind or, you know, zested. It kind of feels like it’s your own,” she explains. She also adds that you can mix in chopped fresh rosemary. “It looks like you made it, but you didn’t,” says Sunny.

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All the Ways to Cook a Potato This Thanksgiving

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 13th, 2015

Stuffed Sweet Potatoes with Pecan and Marshmallow StreuselButtery, rich and oh-so-creamy, mashed potatoes are surely a beautiful thing. But when it comes to putting spuds to work, the everyday mash isn’t the only option. This Thanksgiving, no matter what kind of spuds you have on hand, try stuffing your potatoes, or smashing them, souffleing them, roasting them or even turning them into a bisque. Check out Food Network’s best-ever potato picks below for holiday-worthy inspiration.

Stuffed: Think of Tyler Florence’s easy-to-make sweet potatoes as the cousins of the sweet potato casserole you know and love. He bakes the spuds, then fills them up with a sweetened, cinnamon-scented filling of crunchy pecans and gooey marshmallows.

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7 Thanksgiving Shortcuts to Be Thankful For

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 13th, 2015

Apple PieWhen you’re hosting a big crowd for the holidays or even cooking for a crew of kids — a pair of daunting tasks if there ever was one — this list is for you. And if you’re doing both like I am this Thanksgiving, this one’s for you. And because many of the dishes can easily be made days in advance (or more), you can knock out most of the cooking well before Thanksgiving Day arrives.

Make and Freeze: Apple Pie 
Prepare an unbaked apple pie, like this one from Food Network Kitchen, then pop it into the freezer until you’re ready to bake. The trick: Wrap the whole thing in three layers of plastic wrap, then place in a gallon-size freezer bag or add another layer of aluminum foil. Tips:

  • Take the pie out of the freezer and put directly into the oven, just add 20 to 30 minutes of baking time.
  • Use a metal or ceramic pie plate; glass may not be sturdy enough to go from the freezer to the oven.
  • Pumpkin (or any other kind of custard) pie won’t work as well, but in that case, you could make the crust and freeze it ahead of time.

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Here’s What Food Network Stars Crave Most on Thanksgiving

by in Food Network Chef, Holidays, November 12th, 2015

Sunny AndersonAfter hours (days, really) of prepping each element of Thanksgiving dinner, once your family and friends have gathered around the table and everyone has been served a plate, there’s nothing else to do but finally eat the feast before you. From the mashed potatoes and sweet potato casserole to the Brussels sprouts, roasted carrots and, of course, the juicy turkey, there are countless reasons to love the meal — not to mention the dessert that comes after it — so it’s no surprise that seemingly everyone looks forward to one element of it in particular. FN Dish caught up with some of your favorite chefs, and it turns out that they too crave specific dishes — read on to see what they had to say.

“I look forward to everything, but I love the mac and cheese, because I seldom make it — even though I love mac and cheese — really, because I love it I seldom make it, because it’s a 9-by-13 moment, and what will I do with the rest of it, you know?” Sunny Anderson admits.

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How to Win the Dessert Course This Thanksgiving: Pie, Pie and More Pie

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 12th, 2015

Apple-Pumpkin-Pecan PieAfter a richly decadent Thanksgiving feast of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes and likely several kinds of casseroles, the only way to end the meal is with something sweet … and also richly decadent. If cakes are the go-to at birthday parties, then pies were made for turkey day. Whether your family craves the tradition of a spiced apple pie or prefers the creaminess of the peanut butter variety, there’s indeed a filling for every personality this season. Check out Food Network’s top pie picks below, each a tried-and-true favorite from our chefs.

Apple-Pumpkin-Pecan Pie
Let’s nickname this one “indecision pie”: It’s a three-way mash-up of apple, pumpkin and pecan pies for those times when you really want a slice of all three at the buffet table. With a base of buttery pecans, an edge of sweetened apples and a center of spiced pumpkin puree, this pie boasts comforting fall flavors in each bite.

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Feast Your Eyes on the 11 Best Thanksgiving Side Dishes

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 11th, 2015

Best Thanksgiving Side DishesWhile the turkey often gets all the glory at Thanksgiving dinner, it’s the side dishes that turn the turkey into a full meal. From creamy mashed potatoes and classic green bean casserole to roasted vegetables, cranberry sauces and buttery, flaky breads, the seemingly second-string dishes can indeed take the spotlight at your holiday feast. Below are Food Network’s best-of-the-best side dish picks, the tried-and-true winners that will surely garner praise from your holiday guests.

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8 Turkeys That Are Guaranteed to Deliver Flavor — and Oohs and Aahs from Your Guests

by in Holidays, Recipes, November 10th, 2015

Perfect Roast TurkeyBe honest: Is turkey your favorite part of Thanksgiving? No matter if you answered yes or no, chances are you’ll be cooking up a bird this holiday, as it’s arguably the most-important element of your Thanksgiving dinner table. As the centerpiece of the feast, a winning bird will bring balance to the seemingly never-ending buffet of veggie side dishes (and provide the leftovers for must-have turkey sandwiches), whether you fry it, roast it, stuff it or brine it. Check out some of Food Network’s best-ever turkey recipes below, each chock-full of good-to-know tips from your favorite chefs.

Perfect Roast Turkey: The tried-and-true staples are beloved for a reason, and Ina Garten’s top-rated turkey is no exception to that rule. Ina stuffs the bird with fresh thyme and a halved lemon to gently flavor the bird from the inside out.

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